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Best miter saw for cabinet maker?

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 09-01-2016 04:57 PM 904 views 2 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

79 posts in 127 days


09-01-2016 04:57 PM

I am a professional cabinet maker and am looking for a new miter saw for cutting face frame and cabinet door stiles and rails. So I was looking at reviews online for various miter saws that I am considering, the Bosch glider, Dewalt, ect.. and there are so many bad reviews from people who say that they can’t keep their saws fence and blade at 90 degrees. Which is the problem that I am having with my Dewalt dw716. I am tired of having to mess with this.

My question to you guys would be…are there any older gems, diamonds in the rough ect with regards to the older Delta, Makita, ect units? I keep hearing how these older saws always kept the blade and fence perfect 90 degrees. I don’t need bevel adjustments for this unit. It will be a shop only saw and pretty much never make a miter cut, just straight cuts only. I will build a new stand for whatever I get and make wings to the left and right with stick on tape measures and a stop block system. Any advice?


20 replies so far

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#1 posted 09-01-2016 05:02 PM

What about an RAS?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Loren's profile

Loren

8315 posts in 3115 days


#2 posted 09-01-2016 05:08 PM

Get a non-slider 12” unless you want the slider to
make dado-type cuts.

These saws can even sag in time from the cantilevered
design. A non-slider will generally make more
reliably accurate cross-cuts and not go out of whack
over time. Omga is the best, very expensive. Then
there are the pop-up saws.

I have a Comet Cub you can have if you want to
come get it. Los Angeles. It’s sort of a proto-slider
small, portable RAS.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

819 posts in 366 days


#3 posted 09-01-2016 05:09 PM

This is a great saw for what your after. (Expensive though, but last)
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/135690

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 09-01-2016 05:14 PM

The Dewalt 705 was a real gem. It is the older style with a round twist knob to lock the miter settings, whereas the newer models have a flip lever. The 705 is a 12” fixed type, single bevel compound miter saw. Or choose the 703 for a 10” fixed saw.

It all depends if you need a slider. For me, I chose the accuracy of a fixed saw and made up for capacity by getting the 12” version. Anything too wide for the miter saw can be cut at the TS with a crosscut sled.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View ki7hy's profile (online now)

ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#5 posted 09-01-2016 05:25 PM



The Dewalt 705 was a real gem. It is the older style with a round twist knob to lock the miter settings, whereas the newer models have a flip lever. The 705 is a 12” fixed type, single bevel compound miter saw. Or choose the 703 for a 10” fixed saw.

It all depends if you need a slider. For me, I chose the accuracy of a fixed saw and made up for capacity by getting the 12” version. Anything too wide for the miter saw can be cut at the TS with a crosscut sled.

- pintodeluxe

I have the 705 as well as a regular dewalt chop saw. The chop saw head doeosn’t tilt rotate or move. straight up and down only, haven’t explored if I am able to put a wood blade on it though, I use my 705 for woodworking.

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Loren

8315 posts in 3115 days


#6 posted 09-01-2016 05:26 PM

I had a 705 for years. Great saw for crosscuts.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1866 days


#7 posted 09-01-2016 06:23 PM

If you are a serious cabinet maker and can afford it, a Festool Kapex would be very had to beat.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#8 posted 09-01-2016 07:08 PM

I cut all those part on my slider. If you can build an accurate sled for your table saw that might be an option.
I don’t even have a miter saw in my shop. That’s not to say I don’t have one, it’s just that I don’t use it often
enough to take up space in the shop. I keep it in a storage shed next to the shop. It’s an Hitachi 8’’ slider.

If you have the money Omega makes some non-slider miter saw that are accurate and stay that way.

http://hoffmann-usa.com/machinery/omga-production-miter-saws

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1733 days


#9 posted 09-01-2016 07:26 PM

I bought one of the first 12 Makita SCMS. Have never been able to depend on the miter stops. I have to use a Wixey protractor to set it accurately. It does cut awesome though.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 310 days


#10 posted 09-01-2016 07:43 PM

Most of the saws depend upon a rough casting for the angle detents. This cannot be that accurate. Dewalt uses a metal stamping for the detents and they have adjustability built in. It is the reason I have a Dewalt.

For faceframes you don’t need a 12” saw; and you definitely don’t need a slider. The 10” saws are cheaper and the blades are too. Sliders are just one extra movement that can become an accuracy issue.

For miters a jig that allows you to cut on either side of the blade (on the left side for the left hand piece and on the right side for the right hand piece) is best. It will be like a sliding table miter saw. Much more accurate.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#11 posted 09-01-2016 07:50 PM

To quote the OP

It will be a shop only saw and pretty much never make a miter cut, just straight cuts only.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 310 days


#12 posted 09-01-2016 07:57 PM



To quote the OP

It will be a shop only saw and pretty much never make a miter cut, just straight cuts only.

- AlaskaGuy

For straight cuts only any inexpensive saw with a good bushing will work. For just cabinet work even a 8” mini will do the job and blades are cheaper too. He will only have to check for squareness. I still think Dewalt is the best choice because their stamped detents can be adjusted for square.

In this photo you can see the stamped detents and the slotted holes that allow for adjustability. Mine was perfect from the factory and has never needed an adjustment but it is nice to know that it is available.

http://www.homedepot.com/hdus/en_US/DTCCOMNEW/fetch/FetchRules/Rich_Content/205983654-pod2.jpg

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#13 posted 09-01-2016 10:57 PM

April 2014 issue 240- Marc Adams had his school shop assistants go through a bunch of 12 inch mitersaws and put them through their paces.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/tool-test-12-in-chop-saws.aspx

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Neil's profile

Neil

18 posts in 116 days


#14 posted 09-01-2016 11:09 PM

I’ve used a Hitachi sliding miter saw for years, thought about replacing it with a new model but found another old one on craigslist. Also have a new Hitachi non slider that I use on job sites. I personally like the 8 1/2” blade for cabinet making, you don’t need 12 inches of carbide to cut face frames, just my opinion.

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Cooler

277 posts in 310 days


#15 posted 09-01-2016 11:27 PM



I ve used a Hitachi sliding miter saw for years, thought about replacing it with a new model but found another old one on craigslist. Also have a new Hitachi non slider that I use on job sites. I personally like the 8 1/2” blade for cabinet making, you don t need 12 inches of carbide to cut face frames, just my opinion.

- Neil

I agree. It is smaller, cheaper, the blades are cheaper, and the lower weight puts less stress on the bushings.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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