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Will Poly finish work over this ?

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Forum topic by figg posted 06-08-2010 10:10 PM 3195 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


06-08-2010 10:10 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

This is what my Rosewood piece looks like after I removed the non-drying tacky Arm-R-Seal Poly with steel wool.

haze

This is carried over from my Poly won’t dry over Rosewood thread. It stopped getting views, so I started this thread. As a reminder, I placed 5 coats of Watco Danish Oil on this, and allowed it to dry a couple of weeks. then placed Arm-R-Seal Poly over the top, and six weeks later it still is tacky in places … So I tried to remove it with steel wool last night, and this is now how it looks.

Question is, if i now place a coat of Arm-R-Seal back over this, is it going to look right, and will it dry ? The haze areas make me wonder if this can be saved without stripping it completely.


20 replies so far

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CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3686 days


#1 posted 06-08-2010 10:28 PM

If it no longer feels tacky, the poly should work fine over that. I know it looks bad at the moment, but trust me. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3686 days


#2 posted 06-08-2010 10:32 PM

As a side note, if you have any of that rosewood left unfinished, you might want to try putting some poly on it without using the Danish oil first. You might find that you didn’t really gain much in appearance by putting the opil on first.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


#3 posted 06-08-2010 10:43 PM

Thanks for all the info Charlie. I will indeed try what you said, and the compare the two. Great idea.

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AaronK

1441 posts in 2932 days


#4 posted 06-08-2010 10:46 PM

ive never worked with rosewood before, but know about it and its finishing difficulties from observing it on a guitar of mine. it seems to work much better with penetrating oil than film forming finish. it seems hard enough and oily enough to be pretty durable on its own.

so my question is actually the reverse of charlie’s: what do you gain by putting poly over it?

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#5 posted 06-08-2010 11:19 PM

I would wipe it down with naphtha and make sure you watco is dry then apply a 1lb cut coat of dewaxed shellac. Then you can put wipe on poly.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


#6 posted 06-08-2010 11:21 PM

Hi Aaron …. It looks very dull to me without a top coat. And I am not experienced enough with finishing to try much else at this point.

But a better reason, is because this piece is part of a set, in which some other pieces came out perfectly with the poly, and another couple of the pieces would NOT dry.

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Howie

2656 posts in 2391 days


#7 posted 06-08-2010 11:40 PM

are you sure the pieces that didn’t take were dry enough?

-- Life is good.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3686 days


#8 posted 06-09-2010 02:17 AM

Jim’s advice is best….. I’m just lazy. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


#9 posted 06-09-2010 03:18 AM

Hi Aaron …. It looks very dull to me without a top coat. And I am not experienced enough with finishing to try much else at this point.

But a better reason, is because this piece is part of a set, in which some other pieces came out perfectly with the poly, and another couple of the pieces would NOT dry.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1441 posts in 2932 days


#10 posted 06-09-2010 03:18 AM

there’s no mystery to it really, since those tacky spots follow grain patterns – it’s just different areas of the wood taking it in differently. just how it is sometimes, even when its from the same board!

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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


#11 posted 06-09-2010 03:24 AM

I have mineral spirits and acetone, but I do not have naptha. I’m not sure how to tell if the Watco is dry. It felt dry after two weeks, before I added the poly the first go around.

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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


#12 posted 06-09-2010 03:33 AM

Wow … lots of varied advice.

What are the chances I can just apply another coat of poly now ? Is this likely to just sit there and not dry also ?

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Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2577 days


#13 posted 06-09-2010 03:52 AM

Naphtha is used in lighters and camp stoves, for example, so if you have an old Coleman stove and the fuel for it, you have some naphtha. Alternatively, you could use lacquer thinner. It will cut lesser density petroleum distillates as well. Or acetone. I’ve never had this problem with rosewood, but then, I’ve never used oil to finish a project made with rosewood. I personally would not put poly on until I was sure the oil was off, or completely cured. Depending on how far it penetrated, you may have to wait for it to completely polymerize before putting the poly on. Bummer.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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figg

14 posts in 2379 days


#14 posted 06-09-2010 04:00 AM

OK. And it could take how long to completely polymerize ?

Thanks

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#15 posted 06-09-2010 05:36 AM

Oil finishes can take a long time to cure that’s the reason I prefer other options . It might accelerate the watcos drying if you repeat the cleaning with any of the solvents Atomjack suggested.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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