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Forum topic by myxology posted 08-30-2016 02:33 PM 417 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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myxology

47 posts in 707 days


08-30-2016 02:33 PM

I fear I have made a horrible novice mistake, which considering I’m a novice isn’t entirely unreasonable. But I’m hoping I can recover.

I have glued up this monstrous table top using 2×10s. I did let them dry for about 3 weeks before using them. They were not the straightest things to begin with, but I did the best I could. Then I used a power hand planer and have been working on flattening this thing. I thought I had it pretty flat, but then I came out to the shop a couple days later and it is cupping on me.

I was getting ready to put breadboards on the ends (something I’ve never done before), but now I don’t know if I should just clamp the sides of the top down and make them fit in the breadboards or if it’s just a lost cause. Of course I plan on clamping the table top down to the frame when it’s done, but is that ok, with the breadboards to take the bow out of it, or will it eventually just bow up and twist the whole table?

Just to clarify… In the photos, the plywood and hardboard are my assembly table which is holding the table top I’m working on. It’s not part of the project.

Looking forward to some help. Thanks!


9 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#1 posted 08-30-2016 02:56 PM

Sorry to say this is the curse of construction lumber, it’s VERY difficult to keep this lumber straight with the moisture content and common reaction wood in it. What is your final application? Will the ” rustic” adjective work to explain some hills and valleys or are you going for a dead flat table? Toughest part of this hobby is the need to control so much of the stock, and these sorts of frustrations are what lead me to finding a good sawyer that kiln drys and then a jointer and planer of course… But know you’re not the first at least, and there are some folks who’ll cut kerfs on the underside and force flat erc but I can’t offer any advice on those methods, I don’t do any thing with reclaimed wood where it’s often the only way to get a board flat. Good luck let us know how you fix it

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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myxology

47 posts in 707 days


#2 posted 08-30-2016 03:08 PM

Chef, thanks for the reply. Rustic is absolutely fine on this. It’s an outside table, so it’s going to weather, etc and does not need to be perfect.

Also, I just watched another video on this and it looks like his table did have some bow before he put the breadboard on. I really don’t have a lot of options other than moving forward on this. :/ I hope I didn’t waste all this material.

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ScottM

347 posts in 1613 days


#3 posted 08-30-2016 03:32 PM

One thing I see, which is always a topic of arguments, is the grain direction on your center boards. They are cupped up. You should have the grain with the crown up. I would have also ripped those wide boards into narrower pieces and glued them back together.

But your question was “what now”, so I would get your bottom frame built and try clamping it down to see how much that will flatten it out. In other words, will the top flatten or will the frame lift. If the top flattens then secure it tight in the middle and give it room to move on the outer edges. You said this will be outside, covered I hope, otherwise that wood will be a mess in a short amount of time.

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Eugd

65 posts in 577 days


#4 posted 08-30-2016 03:47 PM

I have a question for Scottm when you said “I would have also ripped those wide boards into narrower pieces and glued them back together”, I saw this from time to time, when do you usually do this resawing? Is it a specific grain pattern or depending on the type of length and width of wood? And if it’s a grain pattern do you remove any sections that results in a narrower peice

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myxology

47 posts in 707 days


#5 posted 08-30-2016 04:12 PM

Scott, thanks for the info. Yes, it will be stained and sealed as another table they have is. I am thinking that the frame will do the job to clamp it down and not lift the frame, but I think what you’re saying is go ahead and build the frame now and test it before I even do the breadboard ends. Is that right? I think that’s a good idea.

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ScottM

347 posts in 1613 days


#6 posted 08-30-2016 04:34 PM



I have a question for Scottm when you said “I would have also ripped those wide boards into narrower pieces and glued them back together”, I saw this from time to time, when do you usually do this resawing? Is it a specific grain pattern or depending on the type of length and width of wood? And if it s a grain pattern do you remove any sections that results in a narrower peice

- Eugd

It was mentioned that the boards were 2×10 and construction lumber. Not resaw them, just rip each board into narrower widths. Depending on how the end grain looks you can actually rip a couple of inches off each edge and end up with just the heart of the board which will be more stable. But I was just really talking about the boards being too wide to glue together and stay flat. Just my approach but I try not to glue anything wider than about 4”.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3337 days


#7 posted 08-30-2016 04:41 PM

just turn it over and get a little air moving on the other side it will reverse, your issue is the top side was exposed to more air flow than the bottom, and it dried out a little more… it will be fine, when its level , cover it top and bottom

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Eugd

65 posts in 577 days


#8 posted 08-31-2016 12:32 AM

Thanks for the info, when you rip them down to 4” are you keeping the same orientation of the grain pattern or are you keeping the same orientation and removing more the leftover of the ends?

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1846 days


#9 posted 09-01-2016 02:50 AM

Charles Neil nailed it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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