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Forum topic by htl posted 08-30-2016 01:01 AM 1011 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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htl

2176 posts in 620 days


08-30-2016 01:01 AM

Here is a new type of free hand cnc router, that will be coming out soon.
Looks like it will have a lot of uses.
I want one now!!! LOL
Story here!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.


26 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#1 posted 08-30-2016 02:10 AM

Please explain what all you think you could use something like that for? I haven’t seen it cut anything with a grain pattern or anything thicker that 1/4 inch thick. I may have miss that stuff.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Lee's profile

Lee

49 posts in 338 days


#2 posted 08-30-2016 03:19 AM

I agree with AG. I’ve tried to follow a line free hand even with 1/8” spiral bit designed for inlay work and i can’t do it. The grain irregularities will be a constant variable. IMHO

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View clin's profile

clin

510 posts in 456 days


#3 posted 08-30-2016 03:24 AM

FYI, there are several threads on LJ about this already.

The point of this tool is it will make the fine corrections to stay on the line. You make the coarse movements. As long as you hold it firmly, I would think it could make any needed adjustments. But I agree that sometimes the grain can pull pretty hard. But just maybe this thing can adjust fast enough and give you the time to react and counter the movement.

Like any tool, it will have it’s place where it works well, and conditions it doesn’t.

-- Clin

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

449 posts in 362 days


#4 posted 08-30-2016 03:36 AM

seems like regression, Pac man folks will love it though.

View jbay's profile

jbay

809 posts in 360 days


#5 posted 08-30-2016 03:44 AM

It’s obviously for light weight routing of designs.
I can see it evolving into a self feeding unit that you can program, set on your work piece, come back to a finished design.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View htl's profile

htl

2176 posts in 620 days


#6 posted 08-30-2016 03:46 AM

I had wondered if it had been on here before but hadn’t seen it.
To me it looks like the start of a more free form use of the cnc, not being locked to a table and have to know all kinds of computer programing to run this would be a plus for those needing the tools but not having the back ground to go with it.
There’s a plus and minus to any new tool just need to see if it will fit your need.


I agree with AG. I ve tried to follow a line free hand even with 1/8” spiral bit designed for inlay work and i can t do it. The grain irregularities will be a constant variable. IMHO

- Lee

Can you feel when the router is having trouble now think of a computer that can sense this also but a 1000 times more sensitive and faster and able to make the corrections needed.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2012 posts in 1629 days


#7 posted 08-30-2016 06:23 AM

I do not understand how it exactly works but it looks it is pushed by hand following the line on the screen. If that is the case this wil never be a succes.

Bruce there is a lot of bla bla on this merchandising video and we don;t see that they are doing a real router project.
For good understanding it is nice that you mentioned the link so I could see it, but as already said I think this nice looking “CNC” router will not work. In particular on solid wood.

I have to admit that I don’t understand the tape that is sticked on the board

We will see how it works.

Anyway thanks for sharing.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

643 posts in 2274 days


#8 posted 08-30-2016 10:16 AM

Technology will continue to evolve the woodworking hobby. That’s just a fact. Some will embrace it, some will fight it, some will remain ever skeptical. As with all technology intrusions, some will be great and some will just be junk. Time will tell what this will be, but no doubt the hobby is progressing.

Very cool, thanks for posting

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

2730 posts in 2647 days


#9 posted 08-30-2016 10:30 AM

Although I see it as another handy tool I want to create my own trucks, wagons, etc. Not a machine.
If I were to start mass producing them for a profit then I might use one.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1633 days


#10 posted 08-30-2016 10:38 AM

If you watched the video. There is a tape looking like a bunch of dominoes laid on the wood. a sensor in the base follows that tape compensating for any hand movement that are made keeping the cutter on the programmed line. I can see some uses for it.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

2730 posts in 2647 days


#11 posted 08-30-2016 12:06 PM

Although I see it as another handy tool I want to create my own trucks, wagons, etc. Not a machine.
If I were to start mass producing them for a profit then I might use one.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View HickWillis's profile

HickWillis

72 posts in 120 days


#12 posted 08-30-2016 01:02 PM

My opinion on it is that it is cool, new technology. Will it serve a purpose for every woodworker? No. But could it open the door to someone new trying to get into the hobby or serve as a way for someone to be very creative with it? Absolutely. Look at some of the crazy (in a good way) things people do with the tools we have today. They won’t be getting $1600 from me as I just don’t have a need for it, but I’m sure there are plenty of people who see this tool as a way to perfect or improve their craft.

-- -Will

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#13 posted 08-30-2016 01:18 PM

Interesting toy. The comment at the beginning that you router something and now you are a master craftsman is a bit of a stretch. Having tape to stay stuck on wood without leaving residual adhesive is a cool technology in itself.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View htl's profile

htl

2176 posts in 620 days


#14 posted 08-30-2016 02:14 PM

If you really look the router is moving by itself all you’re doing is keeping the computer and base following the router, this means it doesn’t matter how big the project is as long as you follow the screen the computer knows where the next area to be worked is and shows you where to keep the base so the router can do it’s job.
There is no need for a large table that limits how big the project can be.

I’m not a cnc er but can see the value of this in the near future.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

1134 posts in 173 days


#15 posted 08-30-2016 03:02 PM

open your wallet up …...LMAO …......I don’t think I would ever want 1 of these….......but that’s just me

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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