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Milwaukee Miter Saw, Is This Wright

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Forum topic by 49er posted 08-29-2016 03:08 PM 608 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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49er

130 posts in 1072 days


08-29-2016 03:08 PM

I have had this saw for about a year and just noticed the rotating table is lower than the ends of the saw by .016. Is this normal or is there an adjustment for it or is it a non problem? It seems to me that any cuts that span the length of the table would not be perfectly square. After saying that, it did take me a year to notice it. In my defense, I don’t use the saw a lot.

-- Correlation is not causation but I did loose my Doctor !!!


17 replies so far

View mako1's profile

mako1

20 posts in 262 days


#1 posted 08-29-2016 03:53 PM

I don’t know where you buy our wood and how you mill it but I would be willing to place a pretty big bet that your wood is not true to 16/1000 th’s of an inch.A difference in humidity could throw it off more than that. Are you an engineer of some sorts?Not being a smartass here.Just curious.I see these types of questions come up from engineers that have taken up woodworking. I used to do some work for a company that made corporate jets and had to mic everything thing I made because it was 100% inspection and was going from IL where I made the product to AR.Some got rejected just because of the change in humidity.A table or chair is not part of a aircraft. Just for kicks mic some of the lumber your using.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#2 posted 08-29-2016 05:11 PM

LOL, I’m not an engineer but I notice stuff like that as well, bugs the hell out of me. Put a couple coats of turtle wax on it, that’ll raise it up flush. But it is normal. Some one told me its done purposely so if you adjust the angle with the board on the saw it has enough clearance to move easily, no idea if its true.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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mako1

20 posts in 262 days


#3 posted 08-29-2016 05:23 PM

What’s normal these days?I don’t think .016 would be out of spec for any WW tool.
I owned a custom cabinet and furniture shop for 14 years.Built some very high end stuff and never used a mic,feeler gauge or dial caliper on anything until the aircraft job came up. I’m pretty anal and a bit of a perfectionist but we are dealing with wood and it’s going to move more than that.
Just like the women I’ve known.Have a good one.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#4 posted 08-29-2016 08:30 PM

I needs some clearance so it isn’t rubbing as it turns. Did you check the fence to make sure it is straight? And did you measure any gap between it and the ends? One way to check the center against the ends would be place a known good straightedge across the bed and then measure any deviation. If it drops down it’s because the original engineer wasn’t a woodworker and it’s being marketed and sold to carpenters where .016 is a laughable tolerance. It’s just not a machine made for precision cutting.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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49er

130 posts in 1072 days


#5 posted 08-29-2016 09:54 PM

Rick, I don’t see why it needs clearance to turn. I could rotate it just fine with a board on it. In the photo that is a straight edge that the feeler gauge is under. I checked it this way because I could see a gap under a board with my non perfect eye sight. I know these saws are mass produced but if I assembled my projects with .016 gaps they wouldn’t look very good.
I managed to get my support benches on each side closer than .016 inch.

-- Correlation is not causation but I did loose my Doctor !!!

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#6 posted 08-29-2016 10:48 PM

I know these saws are mass produced but if I assembled my projects with .016 gaps they wouldn t look very good.
- 49er

How square are the cuts with that miter saw? if the gap of 0.016” makes that much of a difference it’ll show ,I just checked my Bosch SCMS and there’s a gap there also but it cuts perfectly square ,yours might be different ,you should verify the effect of that gap by cutting a piece of lumber and then check with a try square.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1018 posts in 1396 days


#7 posted 08-29-2016 10:52 PM

You really want to know if it’s a problem? Set the saw up right (check your fence for square and straight, check your blade angle for square and vertical. Then make some cuts and check the results. Are the cuts right? I would concentrate more on the pieces the saw turns out and less on the pieces of the saw.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

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jbay

819 posts in 366 days


#8 posted 08-29-2016 11:33 PM

Rick, I don t see why it needs clearance to turn. I could rotate it just fine with a board on it.

- 49er

Do you suppose you could rotate it just fine, because there is .016 clearance? lol
If it creates a problem for you, Cut you a .016 shim to use underneath your workpiece every time you make a cut.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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muleskinner

881 posts in 1904 days


#9 posted 08-30-2016 12:21 AM

If I’m making a cut that is critical to be inside the tolerance of .016 inches* I clamp my work piece to the stationary portion of the table. That’s what I square the blade to. Square is square. It doesn’t matter if there’s a small gap under the piece at the point of the cut.

*I almost always clamp my work piece no matter what tolerance I’m working to. And I think I’d go nuts if I tried to check tolerances to .016 inches. :)

-- Visualize whirled peas

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#10 posted 08-30-2016 12:34 AM


Rick, I don t see why it needs clearance to turn. I could rotate it just fine with a board on it. In the photo that is a straight edge that the feeler gauge is under. I checked it this way because I could see a gap under a board with my non perfect eye sight. I know these saws are mass produced but if I assembled my projects with .016 gaps they wouldn t look very good.
I managed to get my support benches on each side closer than .016 inch.

- 49er

You got the benches close to level with the table as you could because you are a woodworker and understand the value in doing so, but if you were a carpenter chopping 2×4s where the tolerance is, “that looks about right!” then it would be a different story. And there are way more tradesmen than hobby woodworkers. I mistook the straightedge for a 2 part fence, my bad.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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nightguy

213 posts in 129 days


#11 posted 08-30-2016 01:03 AM

I would not worry about .016 of an inch on vertical, now if it was per inch horizontal and cutting wide boards on it it could be an issue. Pay as much attention to your spelling.
Milwaukee Miter Saw, Is This Wright(Right)

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49er

130 posts in 1072 days


#12 posted 08-30-2016 02:21 PM


I would not worry about .016 of an inch on vertical, now if it was per inch horizontal and cutting wide boards on it it could be an issue. Pay as much attention to your spelling.
Milwaukee Miter Saw, Is This Wright(Right)

- nightguy


Hey, “Wright” passed spell check that’s good enough for me. LOL.

When I first set this saw up I didn’t notice the gap under the rotating table but I checked everything else. It would not make a straight-square cut until I replaced the junk blade that came with it. I guess that blade was for carpentry work. I think I will put a shim under the work piece and do some test cuts.

-- Correlation is not causation but I did loose my Doctor !!!

View Tooch's profile

Tooch

1352 posts in 1343 days


#13 posted 09-04-2016 12:57 PM

its hard to tell with the steel rule in place, but I would assume the gap is for clearance of the swivel table. I think that as long as you hold the workpiece over the solid section of the saw you will be ok. I understand your concern about keeping it square, especially on crosscuts, but I think you’ll be fine.

If you are still looking for a solution, I would first think about how much of a potential angle it would be creating. taking the length measurement of the swivel table and doing a little Trig should give you an answer. if it is more than a degree, there is cause for concern. if it is less that half a degree (89.5 to 90) I wouldn’t worry about it

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1018 posts in 1396 days


#14 posted 09-04-2016 01:06 PM

Do trigonometry or make an actual cut. There’s a dilemma.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

1152 posts in 180 days


#15 posted 09-04-2016 02:34 PM

no worries

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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