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Ideas/Jigs On How To Do A Certain Cut With Only A Skil Saw

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Forum topic by gargey posted 08-26-2016 03:03 PM 432 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gargey

490 posts in 243 days


08-26-2016 03:03 PM

Hi,

Disclaimer: I’m not interested in building a boot-strap table saw out of my skil saw, so don’t suggest that.

TASK: I need to cut some hard maple 1×2N’s (3/4×8/4) into strips of 3/4×3/8. I’ll be starting with 6’ lengths and only need 5’ rails as final products, so it would be OK to have some sacrificial waste at the ends.

My only power tools are a Skil circular saw and a bosch jig saw. I could also use my panel rip saw, but I need to rip 40’ and then hand plane down to nice smooth surfaces, so I wonder if anyone has any ideas for jigs that make using the circular saw possible.

This would save me a hell of a lot of sawing and planing. I only get a chance to work for about half hour a night…

I’ve designed a few ideas, but they seem cumbersome so I thought I’d check with the knowledge pool here just in case there’s a better idea here.

This is one of those instances where a table saw would be the right tool, but I just don’t have the space as I work in a corner of my garage.

Thanks


11 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8315 posts in 3115 days


#1 posted 08-26-2016 03:19 PM

You can buy a rip fence for most circular saws.

Take your saw into Sears, I bet they have one that
will fit.

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7180 posts in 2045 days


#2 posted 08-26-2016 03:46 PM

Take a 12 pack of soda pop or beer to your local cabinet shop and pick up

your stock the next day.

Build a track out of ply and have at it.

View jbay's profile

jbay

820 posts in 367 days


#3 posted 08-26-2016 03:58 PM

WOW, your asking to do a really difficult task. It is quite involved, your going to need the following in order to perform this properly.

1- 16” Beam Saw
2- Heavy duty saw horses
3- Inca Fence, (check with Mark, he might loan you his measuring gauge also)
4- Feather Boards
5- Hold down clamps
6- Masking tape to prevent splintering
7- A push stick, (you can google it or look one up here, there are many examples)
8- Safety Goggles
9- Hearing protection
10- Dust Mask

And don’t forget, stand to the side!
Please video tape and post results here.

Thank You and Good Luck

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#4 posted 08-26-2016 04:03 PM

If it is a one time thing, just screw a wood plate to the bottom of the circular saw. And then screw a longish fence for keeping it straight.

Try to get a rip blade for the saw. It will cut easier and more cleanly. I looked on Amazon and I don’t see any rip-specific blades, but they do have some narrow kerf blades that look like they would be fine: https://www.amazon.com/Hitachi-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-Teeth/dp/B01C2T6LM2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1472226933&sr=8-1&keywords=circular+saw+blades+7+1+4+inch+rip

If you scroll down you will see a shop made rip guide (adjustable). You won’t need the adjustability so you can just nail or screw in the guide at a fixed cutting width.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/tools/circular-saws/how-to-use-a-circular-saw-long-cuts/view-all

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#5 posted 08-26-2016 04:05 PM

Years ago I used to make tapered table legs with a circ saw jig. It was plywood with tabs that held the wood and tracks on top to guide the saw. It would work for your purpose too.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#6 posted 08-26-2016 04:21 PM

He could probably just hot glue a 2 foot lone strip of wood to the baseplate of his saw. It will pop off and a little bit of heat will remove the glue.

I would just drill and tap two holes and mount the strip that way with countersunk machine screws. But fast and dirty I think the hot glue will get the job done.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View gargey's profile

gargey

490 posts in 243 days


#7 posted 08-26-2016 07:26 PM

I get how these attachments to the sole plate would set the distance between the block and the blade, but you’d still need a way to fasten board to something during the cut, and there is no surface to do that with since it’s only a 2x and therefore the circ saw sole plat will ride over the whole thing (can’t clamp it).

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gargey

490 posts in 243 days


#8 posted 08-26-2016 07:44 PM

I prob should get a band saw. Probably more versatile compared to a table saw.

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 170 days


#9 posted 08-26-2016 07:50 PM

Well the previous post (some) were good but I just use a straight edge, clamp em down the skill saw will run right along. Similar to what wahoo posted but you can buy a set at lowes they work great. its not that complicated, unless you want it to be.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#10 posted 08-26-2016 08:52 PM

Make a fence like the one waho609 posted above except make the cut off side exactly 3/8” narrower than the actual cut.

Place the stock to be cut against the side. The blade will take exactly 3/8” off. You need to add a stop on the end to keep the stock from sliding. And you will need a piece of flat stock to do dual duty: First to keep the bottom plate flat, and second to keep the stock firmly against the fence.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

822 posts in 388 days


#11 posted 08-28-2016 02:19 PM

gargey,

I length and width of plywood that is bordered on all four edges with 1×2 guide rails might be worth considering to obtain straight rip cuts. The circular saw setting atop the plywood would be kept running true during the rip cut because the base plate of the saw would be captured by the bordering guide rail strips. By making this plywood jig long, the lumber to be ripped could be screwed or clamped to the underside of the jig at each end. Several pieces of double stick tape could also be used to keep the workpiece from shifting during the cut. Since the ripped workpieces are of a consistent width, a pair of stop blocks could be installed under the jig where the stop blocks are referenced off the saw kerf in the jig to yield the proper width.

Making the jig is straight forward except when aligning the second long guide rail. If the second guide rail is not positioned correctly the saw could bind or wonder when riding in the frame. One way to get an exact fit is to place the saw firmly against one or two thicknesses of printer paper sandwiched between the already secured long rail and the edge of the base plate of the saw (with the blade retracted). The second parallel guide rail is then brought into contact with the saw’s opposite base plate edge. The second guide rail is then clamped and screwed into place. The saw can be advanced about 9” and the process repeated. Waxing the base plate of the saw and its edges and the jig would allow the saw to slide smoothly down the length of the jig. After the end rails are installed, a plunge cut through the plywood base of the jig would produce the kerf.

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