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My first dust collector

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Forum topic by Spitfire1 posted 08-25-2016 04:26 AM 585 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Spitfire1

31 posts in 205 days


08-25-2016 04:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question dust collection

I have been reading many articles on dust collection in the workshop lately and think it is time to purchase my first dust collector or extractor. I should mention my workshop is also my garage or my garage is my workshop however you want to look at it so space is always a premium.

Right now my only form of cleanup is a Ridgid shop vac.
I am wondering if I should purchase at dust extractor such as the Bosch or festool CT36, or is a dust collector such as this a better buy

I am also wondering if a dust extractor such as the Festool can be used in place of a shop vac for say cleaning the floor and not simply hooked up to
portable tools such as a sander?

The topic of dust collection in the work shop seems to be beaten to death in other forum topics yet I am more confused than informed.


16 replies so far

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 129 days


#1 posted 08-25-2016 04:40 AM

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 919 days


#2 posted 08-25-2016 04:44 AM

The lung damaging stuff is down around 1-5 microns. Get a 0.5 micron filter bag no matter what else you buy.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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nightguy

213 posts in 129 days


#3 posted 08-25-2016 05:01 AM



The lung damaging stuff is down around 1-5 microns. Get a 0.5 micron filter bag no matter what else you buy.

M

- MadMark

Agree, for got to say that, just answered the floor suck up question.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#4 posted 08-25-2016 10:58 AM

An “extractor” is simply a shop vac that’s very expensive so they call it something else. That’s not to say I don’t favor them because they are real reasons they are so expensive….so yes, it can clean the floor. But you can put a good filter on your Rigid and it will work very well (such as a Gore Clean Stream) albeit much noisier. Some of the higher price models use a bag as a prefilter to keep the main filter form clogging so quickly, and you could also do that with your Rigid. Anyway, regardless of what you do for a vac, it’s not a substitute for a DC, and both are needed in a woodshop (my opinion). The opinions you get here (or any forum) vary widely because we all measure against a different scale. Some want to capture/contain every possible spec of dust, others want to avoid sweeping the floor. If you lean toward the first part of that check out the Pentz site in the FAQ section. If you lean toward the other end most anything you do will work.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1957 posts in 1455 days


#5 posted 08-25-2016 12:03 PM

What type of woodworking are you going to do and what tools will you have. A dust collector is great for larger tools and a vacuum like a dust extractor great for smaller ones like Sanders.

Dust Collectors move large volumes of air at lower suction ( 5-10 inches water).

Shop vac move less air but higher suction (50-100 inches water).

Either way get good filters rated as HEPA.

View Spitfire1's profile

Spitfire1

31 posts in 205 days


#6 posted 08-25-2016 03:09 PM

Tools I have to date are a table saw, 6 inch jointer, lunch box planer and miter saw. Lately been working mostly with composite materials (plywood, melamine and mdf). One consideration I have is that my dust collection needs to be mobile. Currently all my tools are on mobile bases. I generally pull the tools out into the middle of the garage when working on a project then slide them off to the side when done so I can still park in the garage.

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Spitfire1

31 posts in 205 days


#7 posted 08-25-2016 03:21 PM

Hargis, you are right about the shop vac being noisy. My shop vac is on the smaller side. Only 70CFM so anything would be a major step up. I noticed on the link you posted the author recommends at least 800 CFM for table saw. The dust collector picture I posted, is on a mobile base but is only 700CFM. Price wise its about the same as the Festool CT33 or Bosch (actually maybe slightly cheaper). I am wondering now if 700 CFM is adequate.

Ugh this is a complex subject.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

142 posts in 282 days


#8 posted 08-25-2016 03:31 PM

If you want to collect sawdust or shavings from a table saw, jointer or planer, then a real dust collector with a 4 inch or larger hose is your only choice. Even a very powerful shop vacuum doesn’t generate the air flow necessary to do a good job. I own the most powerful shop vacuum Ridgid makes and it is not even close to adequate collecting the shavings from my lunchbox planer or jointer.

Depending on your budget, you may want to consider one of the cyclone dust collectors.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

144 posts in 207 days


#9 posted 08-25-2016 04:12 PM

Spitfire,
FWIW, my workshop is also in my garage, so I had to take space and funds into consideration. I currently run a Ridgid 12gal shop vac with a HEPA filter, bag pre-filter, and dust deputy for spot-cleaning (nice mobile solution). For larger collection, I have a HF 2hp dust collector (wall mounted, but the base isn’t bad and will be re-purposed) running through a $25 trash can lid cyclonic first stage, then venting outside. I also have a Grizzly air filter than I run anytime I’m making dust.
I think all said and done, fittings and ducting outside, I’m in it for about $700, and the setup seems to do the job pretty well.

But do keep in mind that if you want a mobile dust collector and will just puch it up to the tool you’re using, the filter may be more important than the CFM, since you won’t be running it much distance (though 700 still seems very low).

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#10 posted 08-25-2016 04:28 PM

I use both a dust collector and dust extractor. If I could only have one, it would be a dust collector because I think they are more versatile.

The DC unit you have pictured has some positives and some negatives. A pleated HEPA filter is certainly a good thing, and the filter cleaning handle is a plus. The filter is a little small, but if you keep it clean it would probably work fine.
The lower bag will be a pain to change compared to larger bins on cyclone units.

With units less than 1-1/2 h.p. users typically complain of inadequate power.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Nezzerscape

25 posts in 330 days


#11 posted 08-25-2016 05:35 PM

For a reasonable solution, I would suggest the Harbor Freight dust collection (~$230). You can swap out the lower bag for cyclonic trashcan to get the get the bulk and upgrade the filer to a .5 Micron. Should run about ~$300 all said and done.

Nez

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#12 posted 08-25-2016 07:41 PM

Most of the time the factory CFM numbers on DCs are about as accurate as the 6.5 HP painted on your shop vac. By the time you hook it up to anything, that number will be cut roughly in 1/2. The Pentz number of 800 CFM is very ahad to achieve, usually taking a much larger DC and 6” ducting (minimum), to say nothing about the changes needed to most factory tool ports. If you intend to just use 4” flex for your mobile setup, i think the unit you show would do just fine. So would the HF unit unit (with some mods). the extractors have other advantages besides quiet, they are made to a much higher standard than the cheaper vacs and typically have a very long life. But to the hobbyist woodworker I’m not convinced they are always worth it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Spitfire1's profile

Spitfire1

31 posts in 205 days


#13 posted 08-26-2016 01:54 AM

Great advice. I’m loving this site more all the time.

Sounds like a dust collector is a better buy then an extractor. The one I pictured is currently on sale for $479. There is one very similar listed for $589 with a larger HEPA filter. I am in Canada so Harbour Freight isn’t much if of an option. I have ordered from Grizzly before but brokerage and shipping across the border is a bit of a pain with added brokerage fees and the poor exchange rate. Although I am intrigued since they have a 1hp DC rated at 800 CFM.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2437 days


#14 posted 08-26-2016 02:48 AM

Beware of CFM ratings that don’t also include a static pressure value to go with it.
One means absolutely nothing without the other.

For example, a high pressure rating without a CFM is probably the maximum pressure with the inlet completely blocked. A high CFM rating without a corresponding pressure rating is probably the maximum theoritical flow without any restrictions; like with no duct work or hoses, not very useful information.

An honest rating would be like: 600CFM @ 14” WC. That means the machine can move that volume of air with 14 inches of pressure to create the needed velocity in the duct. There are charts and calculations that can be used to know what that system will actually do. Without both numbers not so much.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Spitfire1

31 posts in 205 days


#15 posted 08-26-2016 03:43 PM

Could you please elaborate some more on this? I see the Grizzly is listed 2.76 static press while cant find any info for the Canadian woodworker one pictured above.

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