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Forum topic by dschlic1 posted 08-23-2016 05:00 PM 884 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dschlic1

330 posts in 1429 days


08-23-2016 05:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip router

Just saw on a tech web site this interesting tool.

It is basically a hand held CNC machine. No bed size limitations. I can also see using this to make very long box joints (four feet anyone?). And the cost is in the same range as a higher end small CNC unit.


20 replies so far

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richimage

23 posts in 1190 days


#1 posted 08-23-2016 05:16 PM

at $1500 bucks, that’s an entry-level “real” CNC, but it is very interesting!

-- "Women are like modern paintings. You can't enjoy them if you try to understand them." Farrokh Bulsara (Freddie Mercury)

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#2 posted 08-24-2016 01:51 AM

I saw that video and I would need to try it out before I believe all those claims for that price!
I just don’t see how any degree of accuracy can be made with a handheld router because many times wood grain has different ideas.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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clin

510 posts in 456 days


#3 posted 08-24-2016 02:16 AM



I saw that video and I would need to try it out before I believe all those claims for that price!
I just don t see how any degree of accuracy can be made with a handheld router because many times wood grain has different ideas.

- oldnovice

Not a lot of explanation, but I think while the base is handheld, it can move the router within the base to correct for errors. So as long as you track within some range of the desired line, it will make the final adjustment. Seems like a plausible concept. Just get close by hand and let it do the fine tuning.

As for handling wood grain variations, I think all that would be needed is a firm grasp of the router. Assuming of course the mechanism itself is sturdy. But I think it could be as good or maybe even better than a regular CNC because all the linkage works of a very small area.

But at $1,500 I’ll wait until I can get one at Harbour Freight for $50.

-- Clin

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Rentvent

148 posts in 309 days


#4 posted 08-24-2016 02:16 AM

pass.

The programming and setup effort is the same as CNC but you have to do all the work like following lines on a scroll saw.

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#5 posted 08-24-2016 05:54 AM

clin, I read some of the design information as I worked in control systems for over 30 years and I was curious. The base has two motors, an X and Y axes, and the Z axis is the plunge action of the router in the base.

Rentvent your are absolutely correct, it is a very expensive scroll saw!

It’s not really a replacement for a CNC either!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#6 posted 08-24-2016 06:01 AM

I don’t see this as a replacement for CNC specifically, the difference is you can haul this to the jobsite on the seat of your pickup. I feel like the marketing is off because no one is going to buy this to make a soap box derby car. The application for this will be industrial, construction, and a few hobbyists with fat wallets. $1500 is the get in early price, once it comes to market the price is $2099.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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CM02WS6

61 posts in 802 days


#7 posted 08-24-2016 07:24 PM

I just pre-ordered! Been thinking about getting into CNC but the cost and space requirements have turned me away. This solves both of those problems, and with manageable limitations for the type of work I do. Looking forward to getting it next year!

If anyone wants to save us each $100, then PM me and I’ll send you my referral link. Won’t post it here for fear of breaking rules about such a thing.

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dschlic1

330 posts in 1429 days


#8 posted 08-25-2016 05:01 PM

I have been doing some more research, and there is a similar unit on the market.
Doesn’t use optics, rather uses indexing strips. Software on the Handibot is much simpler. The challenge for the Shaper Origin is the image referencing system. Quite a bit of state of the art video processing that needs to happen. The mechanics for the Shaper Origin is pretty much off the shelf standard components.

I see a market for the home woodworking working out of their garage. Very hard to fit a 4’ x 4’ footprint in that situation. I am in that situation and that is why I am interested in that unit.

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Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#9 posted 08-25-2016 05:20 PM

Handibot appears to just be a portable CNC machine.

I see the Origin’s strength as a substitute or extension of hand held or template routing, less so for making parts. I keep trying to think of unique uses for it and can’t think of any that I couldn’t also do with templates.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#10 posted 08-25-2016 05:22 PM

Rick M., additionally, the Handibot does not require “hands on” while doing its job versus the Shaper|Origin.
There are also some Shopbot videos where the Handibot is held against a wall showing versatility.

However, that is not to say that the Shaper|Origin won’t find its applications and users as it is with all tools there are pros and cons that will arise!

I watched the video on Tested by Adam Savage that shows a good “newbie” test of this Shaper|Origin.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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dschlic1

330 posts in 1429 days


#11 posted 08-26-2016 05:04 PM

I saw one potential application (commercial) for the Shaper. The video showed routing a pocket for a flush door handle of some type. Could do it other ways, but that looked much easier. Another application is inlays in the center of a large surface.

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DirtyMike

449 posts in 362 days


#12 posted 08-26-2016 05:07 PM

I saw jimmy d. using one and i thought it was a sign makers dream tool.

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joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1532 days


#13 posted 08-26-2016 06:07 PM

Augmented reality is fun.

-- Who is John Galt?

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Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#14 posted 08-26-2016 06:19 PM



I saw jimmy d. using one and i thought it was a sign makers dream tool.

- DirtyMike

For basic signs definitely. The sign business is transitioning quickly to CNC’d 3D designs in foam and they can cut pretty fast, way faster than you could do it with the Origin.
https://youtu.be/fGlmR9r7fJk?t=25s

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#15 posted 08-26-2016 11:52 PM

Thanks Rick M, that’s another situation where Handibot has an edge, it can do
That video presented a growing use for CNC routers and you can probably find a lot more at Vectric which is probably the leading “garage shop” CNC software company.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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