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Forum topic by MrRon posted 08-22-2016 07:56 PM 761 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


08-22-2016 07:56 PM

Woodpecker tools are pretty in that anodized red finish. I don’t own any of them nor do I plan to in the future. I’m sure they are plenty accurate and precise for woodworking, but I feel they cost too much. My only other objection is they are made of aluminum. In the metalworking world of which I am a member, precision tools of the trade must be made of a strong and durable material; steel is that material. Aluminum is too soft and is damaged easily, making it a poor choice for a tool that must maintain precision. My precision tools are all steel and serve a dual purpose for wood as well as metalworking. I would suggest anyone looking to purchase a precision tool, to look at metalworking tools as a better choice than aluminum tools. Their cost is mostly less than the cost of a Woodpecker tool with an accuracy better than any non-steel tool. One word of note; Stay away from Harbor Freight “precision” tools. Check out precision tools at:
http://www.mscdirect.com/browse/Measuring-Inspecting?navid=12107563
http://www.wttool.com/index/page/category/category_id/12645/category_chain/12645/name/Precision+Equipment/sub_category/1


11 replies so far

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Heywood

35 posts in 912 days


#1 posted 08-22-2016 10:53 PM

I am a huge fan of Woodpeckers tools. First and foremost I search out products Proudly Made In The USA. The Woodpeckers tools are machined out of solid blocks of aluminum and are very precise. Mine will last me my lifetime and then some. I take great care of my tools and all of the tools have a case or storage board which is included with each tool. So as long as I am not throwing them at a brick wall I don’t see where they will be any less than precise.
But to each their own and we all get to choose how we spend our hard earned dollars.

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Jack Lewis

78 posts in 541 days


#2 posted 08-22-2016 10:58 PM

We made passenger airplanes out of aluminum, they last pretty good and the title does say”WOODPECKER” not metal pecker.

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"

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BulldogLouisiana

215 posts in 603 days


#3 posted 08-22-2016 11:37 PM

Why do this? You felt the forum needed to be advised that because you think they are too expensive, people should go in a different direction? I’m at a loss.

I own several woodpecker tools. I don’t abuse my tools, so they are still incredibly precise.

-- There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don't.

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woodbutcherbynight

2427 posts in 1872 days


#4 posted 08-23-2016 01:35 AM

They have some interesting tools. True they are a bit pricey same could be said of Starrett and I own a few of them. (I would admit they were a birthday gift from my Father.) Then of course there is Tormek. I am certain that would get a long string of comments both ways. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Woodbum

729 posts in 2529 days


#5 posted 08-23-2016 12:12 PM

There are numerous tool lines that are thought to be too expensive for what they offer. I am a fan of Woodpeckers and their tools because their quality products are well made, precisely engineered tools from a family owned company in the US. I also have several Starrett tools that I spent a lot of money on because once again, I wanted precision and accuracy. I take care of my tools, and when I am no longer able to use them, someone will have some great heirlooms that will last THEM a lifetime too.
But in my case there are limits. I do not own any of the green German made power tools even though they are great tools, crafted well and built, I would think for the long haul. For me, they are ridiculously priced; but I will not bad mouth them regardless of my personal opinion. Buy the best tools that you can afford, need and want based upon your own particular situation. If you think a certain tool is too expensive, don’t buy it. Someone else will and be happy to do so. That is what it is all about…choice.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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Dustin

143 posts in 204 days


#6 posted 08-23-2016 04:54 PM

I kinda consider Woodpeckers and Festool to be “beautique” level tools, but giving them to me at this point would be casting pearls before swine. The precision of the tool would far exceed the precision of my final product. I consider high quality tools like this something to aspire to, like an award for developing my skills further.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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ellen35

2724 posts in 2896 days


#7 posted 08-23-2016 04:59 PM

You get what you pay for. Great company with great service. If you want Harbor Freight quality, that is your prerogative.

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

78 posts in 541 days


#8 posted 08-23-2016 05:00 PM



We made passenger airplanes out of aluminum, they last pretty good and the title does say”WOODPECKER” not metal pecker.

- Jack Lewis


WHY? strive for precision of .001 in a material that has no respect for anything but the relative humidity? The darn stuff is going to move exactly as it wishes no matter how close of a tolerance we impose upon our self. I don’t mean be sloppy with accuracy but with wood there are imposed limitations. SURE, impose accuracy limitations upon yourself if you wish but they really are not a personal bragging point.

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"

View Ray's profile

Ray

119 posts in 1466 days


#9 posted 08-24-2016 01:24 AM

I think the OP’s main suggestion was “I would suggest anyone looking to purchase a precision tool, to look at metalworking tools”. I appreciated the suggestion. He probably went farther than he should have when he started talking quality without the testing data to back it up.

I don’t plan on beating people up for good intentions- just offer constructive criticism, politely.

-- Creating less fire wood every day

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1009 days


#10 posted 08-24-2016 12:36 PM


We made passenger airplanes out of aluminum, they last pretty good and the title does say”WOODPECKER” not metal pecker.

- Jack Lewis

WHY? strive for precision of .001 in a material that has no respect for anything but the relative humidity? The darn stuff is going to move exactly as it wishes no matter how close of a tolerance we impose upon our self. I don t mean be sloppy with accuracy but with wood there are imposed limitations. SURE, impose accuracy limitations upon yourself if you wish but they really are not a personal bragging point.

- Jack Lewis

You’re right about movement in wood but why not get it as accurate as you can when you build it though? I mean why would anybody buy a square that isn’t square? I’ve got a couple of their squares and really like them. Not to say they aren’t expensive but I’ve got no problem supporting am American company that makes a quality product.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#11 posted 08-24-2016 01:21 PM

I’ve got two woodpecker tools. One is a 36” ruler/straight edge. The other is an 8” layout tool, kinda Ike the t square in the recent reviews.

The ruler was not an more expensive than the other stuff in stock at Woodcraft when I bought it. The Layout tool cost the same as a Starrett square, but those little holes sized just right for pencil lead make super accurate and repeatable layouts a breeze. I feel like on that one I paid for the excellent design. We’ll worth it.

Some of their other stuff I look at and think I can find equal accuracy for a lower price elsewhere. Just like everything else in life, it’s a value judgement on a case by case basis.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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