LumberJocks

How to create a smooth edge for a curved opening

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by BB1 posted 08-21-2016 08:10 PM 382 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


08-21-2016 08:10 PM

So the post yesterday of the tissue box holder http://lumberjocks.com/projects/263338 motivated me to move on one for myself. I have the box part in glue up but am stuck on how to smooth out the opening for the top. I traced the cutout (slightly smaller so the tissue box won’t show) and then my husband cut the opening on his scroll saw. The edges are a bit rough. I fear if I try to sand the edges I’ll have an uneven opening. A trim bit in my router was my next thought but that would require I could construct a decent template. Is there a better way?


18 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7173 posts in 2041 days


#1 posted 08-21-2016 08:12 PM

Spindle sander

Files and sand paper is tedious work but the results are worth it.

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#2 posted 08-21-2016 08:16 PM



Spindle sander

- waho6o9

Yes, that would be good..but, as of now, I don’t own one so that unfortunately isn’t an option. Maybe a reason to add another tool in the shop.

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#3 posted 08-21-2016 08:23 PM

Files and sand paper is tedious work but the results are worth it.

- waho6o9


This is a possibility although I question my ability to make the two sides mirror images. Any hints on the best way to approach? Guessing slow and patient are key.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7173 posts in 2041 days


#4 posted 08-21-2016 08:41 PM

Guessing slow and patient are key.

Correct, equal amount of sanding until it’s pleasing to the eye. Tedious but worth it

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7173 posts in 2041 days


#5 posted 08-21-2016 08:43 PM

These work okay but I find it difficult to get the opening symmetrical with them.

Hello files and sandpaper. :)

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#6 posted 08-21-2016 09:18 PM

Yes…when I checked on cost for a spindle sander my husband laughed and said that would make for a pretty expensive tissue box holder! Looks like I better get to filing and sanding! :)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#7 posted 08-21-2016 09:30 PM

If it’s a one time thing – sanding, filing, sanding, filing some more, sanding… will get you there. If you plan on making more than one, a router, guide bushing and template would make it much easier. You only have to make the template once, and you can use your existing top (once shaped properly) to whip one out easily.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7173 posts in 2041 days


#8 posted 08-21-2016 09:31 PM

Have fun

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#9 posted 08-21-2016 09:57 PM



If it s a one time thing – sanding, filing, sanding, filing some more, sanding… will get you there. If you plan on making more than one, a router, guide bushing and template would make it much easier. You only have to make the template once, and you can use your existing top (once shaped properly) to whip one out easily.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


Will have to see how successful I am at getting this one with the filing and sanding. If it wasn’t for the odd shape, making a template would seem to be the way to go. When I see templates used on woodworking shows, it seems the templates just “appear”...I suspect that is the hardest part.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#10 posted 08-21-2016 10:07 PM

It would be easier if you made a positive template of just the oval shape first. Rough cut to shape and final sand on a belt or disc sander right to the line. Once you have the positive, you can use it to make the negative. Fortunately, you only have to go through the pain of getting it shaped properly once :)

I have a negative template to make these ovals on house signs:

(and a positive template for the fishy thing!)

And here are some positive templates for table number bases:

Alternatively, they do sell templates ready to go – if you don’t want to make them yourself. It will give you a limited choice of sizes, but one may be close enough to what you need.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#11 posted 08-21-2016 10:26 PM

Brad – I can see how helpful that would be. Unfortunately as with the spindle sander…no belt or disc sander either (so many tools yet to be added to my shop!). I’m picking away with hand sanding and it is looking better.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

828 posts in 686 days


#12 posted 08-21-2016 10:52 PM

I’ve always used templates and my router table. The template is cut into 1/4 masonite. Typically I’ll draw the opening onto a largish piece, then split it on the table saw through the center. This makes it easy to trim the waste up to the line with a bandsaw and makes it easier to shape and refine the curve (I do this with both halves aligned, back to back, in a vice, doing both halves at the same time). Start with a coarse rasp, go finer, finally use strips of sandpaper.

Once done, I’ll double-side tape the two halves to a new piece of masonite for the final template. The hole is cut out with a jig saw, staying just inside the previous template.

It is then to the router table with a bearing guided bit riding on the two part template, the masonite routes nicely.

All done! The wood parts are done with the one piece template double side taped in place, hole cut out as before. Watch the grain direction to avoid tearout (down-hill cuts). I use a bit with top and bottom guide bearings to make this easy.

It’s worth the effort if you plan on making more than several cutouts!

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

61 posts in 802 days


#13 posted 08-21-2016 11:04 PM

A sanding drum on a Dremel tool works well and is easy to control. They are just a smaller version of what waho6o9 posted.

View BB1's profile

BB1

486 posts in 312 days


#14 posted 08-22-2016 12:10 AM

Thank you for the addition suggestions…no bandsaw or dremel (yet!). Obviously I need to go tool shopping. :)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#15 posted 08-22-2016 12:42 AM

Thank you for the addition suggestions…no bandsaw or dremel (yet!). Obviously I need to go tool shopping. :)
- BB1

Belt sanders and dremels show up on CL all the time in the $10-$20 range :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com