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Building a dining table, need options for attaching the top to the posts

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Forum topic by FancyShoes posted 08-21-2016 02:55 PM 1301 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FancyShoes

509 posts in 829 days


08-21-2016 02:55 PM

What are some good ways to attach a table top to the posts of a table, Im not using a apron since I am using a thick top, and thick beams for the table legs.

Not sure the best, or all of the options for attaching. Thanks for any input.


12 replies so far

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2324 days


#1 posted 08-21-2016 03:44 PM

Pocket screws?

JUST KIDDING!!!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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AandCstyle

2572 posts in 1722 days


#2 posted 08-21-2016 09:42 PM

Fancy, I would cut tenons on the tops of the legs and corresponding mortises in underside of the top. Since there aren’t any aprons, the top’s movement won’t be an issue. You could do through tenons and pin the tenons from the sides if you like. FWIW

-- Art

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firefighterontheside

13496 posts in 1322 days


#3 posted 08-21-2016 09:58 PM

I would still have aprons and use furniture bolts with machine thread at one end and wood thread at other end. Then you can take the legs off easily for transport.
Otherwise I’m thinking use pieces of angle iron that are mortised into the legs and into the underside of the top and then some torx head lags into the top and legs thru the angle. Make sense?

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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firefighterontheside

13496 posts in 1322 days


#4 posted 08-21-2016 09:59 PM

I like Arts plan and mine put together.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 907 days


#5 posted 08-22-2016 07:14 AM


Im not using a apron since I am using a thick top, and thick beams for the table legs.

- FancyShoes

Even with a thick top and large legs, you will need some kind of racking resistance (typically provided by the aprons)—-so the table doesn’t fold up like a house of cards—-or at least develop a wobble.

Think about it. What keeps the legs vertical when somebody leans on (or drags) the table?

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

461 posts in 367 days


#6 posted 08-22-2016 08:04 AM

I agree with an apron providing the best rigidity, the last thing anyone wants is a Wobbly table. If you are build a conventional 4 corner leg table, aprons are best. Depending on the weight and thickness of your top you may be able to mount bolting flanges to the top of your legs. works well for joining metal to wood. I have been using x legs with a trestle to join them and it is fantastically solid. It requires some big angled half laps and some critical cuts . I like working with thick tops and really dont care for the look of an apron. I leave out that top horizontal leg brace and instead router out top so the legs fit in tight. I mount a metal bolting flange to the legs and then to the top. The picture below is not mine.

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nightguy

213 posts in 127 days


#7 posted 08-22-2016 08:23 AM

I am just spit balling here, Jack!! But a pic of your table design would help to answer your question.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

461 posts in 367 days


#8 posted 08-22-2016 08:31 AM

Very fitting name.

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nightguy

213 posts in 127 days


#9 posted 08-22-2016 09:28 AM



Very fitting name.

- DirtyMike

And into the almost early AM, here in WI it is 430ish now!! Surprising I am up by 9 ish AM.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 08-22-2016 12:02 PM

I think you’re incorrect in assuming because the top is thick it doesn’t need support. It depends on the dimensions, but if the table is only supported in a single point by the legs, it will be free to cup, bow or warp if the wood so decides.

Without seeing your design I can’t specifically advise other than say there are 2 basic designs for a table: apron or trestle.

I suppose you could use steel support braces or other heavy duty hardware if you’re dead set on the no apron approach.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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marcsitkin

19 posts in 222 days


#11 posted 08-22-2016 12:50 PM

Apron, trestle, or mortise and tenon are the most common methods. Take a look at the Anarchist’s design book by Chris Shwartz if you’d like to see some example of his mortise and tenon methods.

-- Thanks, Marc Sitkin, Harwich, MA

View ThistleDown's profile

ThistleDown

12 posts in 182 days


#12 posted 08-22-2016 01:22 PM

Art has a good idea and Jerry points out good points about support and wobble.

Try looking in here, https://archive.org/details/cassellscarpentr00hasl

Most of the joinery in here can be used on a smaller scale that you may be able to apply to your table while not using aprons.

-- My biggest fear is that when I am gone, my wife will sell my tools for what I told her I paid for them.

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