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Salvaging Flooded Motors???

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Forum topic by USAwoodArt posted 08-20-2016 03:21 PM 465 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


08-20-2016 03:21 PM

We just had a lot of flooding here in southern Louisiana last sunday and I had a bit over 2 feet of water in my shop. I have been cleaing up everything and have had fans blowing on the motors for several days , scrubbed the stationary tool tops with WD40 and 1200 wet dry sandpaper. Fortunately water never reached the tops of the saw surfaces but the motors were underwater.
Wew got electricity back yesterday and now I have my shop air conditioner and dehumilifier running constantly. Just ordered 2 more dehumidifiers that will arive Tuesday.

My motors for the SawStop, bandsaw, jointer and floor planer are my major concern.

Has anyone personally ever dried and salvaged a flooded motor before? I have spoken to people with a lot of ”THEORIES” and thoughts about it but none that had any actual experience dealing with flooded tools beore.

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"


17 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1635 days


#1 posted 08-20-2016 03:55 PM

I would rinse them out with fresh clean water. blow them out with compressed air and let air dry for several days. You definitely want to open up and clean and dry the electronics on that sawstop.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#2 posted 08-20-2016 04:27 PM

Greg, will need a good cleaning. I’ve started a couple ACs and water pumps with only minor probs at a couple flooded houses already.

If you need someone to check out anything electrical at your home or shop just shoot me a message bud.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

115 posts in 2470 days


#3 posted 08-20-2016 05:10 PM

As long as there was no power applied when they became flooded, drying them out should be ok. As already stated though, be certain they are DRY. The bearings might also need some attention.

Wayne

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4451 posts in 3423 days


#4 posted 08-20-2016 05:14 PM

Fridge, That is a fine response and offer. You are to be commended.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3333 days


#5 posted 08-20-2016 05:32 PM

Having at one time in my life being an insurance appraiser , for physical damage, I learned a lesson, it all depends on if it was salt water/brackish water or fresh water. Fresh water you can dry out , clean up and lubricate. Salt and brackish, not so much, 6 months, a year later, corrosion begins and its all over, especially for electronics, clean well

I handled Hurricane Hugo, in Charleston SC as well as Andrew in Fla,

BTW my hopes and prayers go out to you guys, I pray you a full recovery ..

Charles

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


#6 posted 08-20-2016 05:33 PM

Thanks for the quick replies.. I do much appreciate it. Fridge… your offer is much appreciated. The people at PMC said they do their own complete electrical check before they put power to any tools they work on

I just spoke to PMC Woodworking in Hammond, La. I bought my several of my larger stationary tools from them and they have a technician that can come out and do a complete and thorough evaluation and necessary mantenance and/or replacement of any parts necessary. I considered pulling the motors myself but they are masssively heavy and difficult to get to. I would be much better off having PMC take care of it and know it has been done correctly.

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3333 days


#7 posted 08-20-2016 05:49 PM

I agree, and I hope you have Flood insurance, in any event, photograph and document and document some more, pictures and videos can save your butt in a case like this, .

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1411 days


#8 posted 08-20-2016 05:59 PM

I’m with the general consensus a good drying and all should be fine. My concern would be the electronics in the SS, and the contacts in the magnetic starters.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#9 posted 08-20-2016 07:09 PM

No prob. A PMC tech looking at it would be awesome. If you need any help in the electrical realm I live and work nearby.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


#10 posted 08-20-2016 08:00 PM



I agree, and I hope you have Flood insurance, in any event, photograph and document and document some more, pictures and videos can save your butt in a case like this, .

- CharlesNeil


We have flood insurance. However, it sttes in the policy that only the main dwelling and its contents are covered. I don’t think they would consider my barn to be my main dwelling even though I spend more time in it than I do In the house.
I have heard that over 80% of the people in this part of the state do not have flood insurance because this is the first time ever that anyone or their ancestors can remember that this area has flooded. Our house is at one of the highest points in the area. Others in the area had higher water than we did. One house down by the creek was raised on stilts about 8 ft off the ground and they still had water up to their windows.

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


#11 posted 08-20-2016 08:01 PM



No prob. A PMC tech looking at it would be awesome. If you need any help in the electrical realm I live and work nearby.

- TheFridge


Thanks Fridge…

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


#12 posted 08-20-2016 08:03 PM



I m with the general consensus a good drying and all should be fine. My concern would be the electronics in the SS, and the contacts in the magnetic starters.

- Shawn Masterson


Shawn…that’s why I am leaving it up the the people that are experts at the servicing and repairs. I am better at using the tools than at diagnosing and repairing them.

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View MikesProjects's profile

MikesProjects

163 posts in 1365 days


#13 posted 08-20-2016 08:27 PM

I am a millwork installer. Years ago I had a few totes filled with powertools in them inside my open bed truck. We had epic rains for several days & the totes filled all the way up with water. The lids leaked. Here is a list of some tools submerged for several days. Bosch jigsaw, portercable beltsander, bosch hammerdrill, 4 or 5 routers, drills, circular saw & more. I didnt know it happened until I got to the jobsite. So I spent the next hour using compressed air to blow the water out & I then squirt or saturated the internals with WD-40 & let them dry for a few days. Yup, I didn’t have a problem with any of them & they all workd great even today. I think one of the routers started making a minor funny noise but it went away with time. Dude, sorry you were affected by the floods. I have been watching.

-- -Mike, Southern California, YouTube User ( Give & Take )

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


#14 posted 08-20-2016 08:40 PM



As long as there was no power applied when they became flooded, drying them out should be ok. As already stated though, be certain they are DRY. The bearings might also need some attention.

Wayne

- xeddog


Definitely no power to them. I turned off the power to the shop as soon as I knew the water was nearing the shop. I put up everything i possibly could to a higher location in the shop but ran out of higher space and time.

the crud line is the highest water level

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 405 days


#15 posted 08-20-2016 08:46 PM



I am a millwork installer. Years ago I had a few totes filled with powertools in them inside my open bed truck. We had epic rains for several days & the totes filled all the way up with water. The lids leaked. Here is a list of some tools submerged for several days. Bosch jigsaw, portercable beltsander, bosch hammerdrill, 4 or 5 routers, drills, circular saw & more. I didnt know it happened until I got to the jobsite. So I spent the next hour using compressed air to blow the water out & I then squirt or saturated the internals with WD-40 & let them dry for a few days. Yup, I didn t have a problem with any of them & they all workd great even today. I think one of the routers started making a minor funny noise but it went away with time. Dude, sorry you were affected by the floods. I have been watching.

- MikesProjects


I’ve used 3 large spray cans of wd40 so far. primarily cleaning surface rust starting to form on the tables of the saws. I always keep past wax on all my tool tables and it has helped…but the rust still is going to come and i want to be one step ahead of it. Haven’t sprayed WD40 insside the motors however, because i was not sure what effect it would have.

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

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