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Non-perpendicular joint design

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Forum topic by MisterCat posted 06-02-2010 07:02 AM 1740 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MisterCat

22 posts in 2386 days


06-02-2010 07:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: join design

Over the weekend I wanted to make some simple stands for holding up a sheet of plywood so that I could attach straight edges and do a decent job making cuts to the whole sheet. I’d seen a picture of some stands that seemed like a good idea. The two vertical stands are braced from behind by another 2×4 which are clamped to my work-bench. To keep the plywood from wanting to tip, I decided to design the stands to lean back at 15 degrees

It’s the connection between the braces and the stands that lead to an interesting design problem. I originally had envisioned a sliding dovetail connection, however with the braces and stands not meeting at a 90 degree angle, I couldn’t figure out a way to cut the joint.

After working for a while to try and come up with a design, here’s what I came up with.

CAD Sketch

The drawing shows the side view: The horizontal member is the brace that gets clamped to the work bench, the board that comes down at 75 degrees is the board the plywood will sit against, and the left hand edge must be free of metal. The blue hatch shows the area to be removed from the stand (that’s the easy one). The red outline shows the original shape of the brace.

The only hard part is cutting the little wedge out where I’ve marked ‘problem area’ Normally this would be pretty easy to notch out on a band saw, but I only have a table saw. I ended up cutting it with a handsaw, and my first attempt was horrible (getting the saw to accurately grab at a 15 degree angle is hard), the 2nd one was better when I clamped on guide block. Neither was a resounding success.

Can anyone offer a better/easier design for this short of joint? One of the challenges is that I want to keep it so that the joint can be knocked down for storage.


6 replies so far

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#1 posted 06-02-2010 07:12 AM

How about a pattern with a router?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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MisterCat

22 posts in 2386 days


#2 posted 06-02-2010 07:49 AM

Jim, I’m not sure I follow. How would you set the router up to get an arbitrary angle at the end of a 4 foot long 2×4? I didn’t think of using a router, though I guess I could have attached a 15 degree wedge to the base plate and used a traditional dovetail bit. Working the end of the brace seems tricky, at least with anyway I can think of doing it.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#3 posted 06-02-2010 06:30 PM

Sorry I Didn’T see this last night. From what the drawing looked like I was think you could make a pattern that would go on both sides of the 2×4 and have it extend long enough on the tenon so the router could sit there and cut your angle. I don’t know it that makes sense to you or not. It’s hard for me to visualize with out photos.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#4 posted 06-02-2010 06:54 PM

Good thinking Dave .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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MisterCat

22 posts in 2386 days


#5 posted 06-02-2010 11:03 PM

I think I have to agree with the bridle joint idea, perhaps with a through dowel to make it nice and tight. Remove the dowel and it knocks down easily enough when the dowel is pulled out.

Thanks for the great idea, Dave!

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rance

4245 posts in 2623 days


#6 posted 06-03-2010 12:00 AM

First thing that comes to my mind is rotate the horizontal board up on edge and cut it in your TS (just like you cut the opposite edge near where it says “90 deg.”. Tilt your TS blade to 15 deg.. Then cut the problem area first, move the fence over(and lower the blade a bit) then cut the place where it says “90 deg.”.

Second choice would be to put pocket screws from the bottom of the horizontal board going into the 75 deg. piece(also using glue of course).

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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