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Forum topic by JustLikeJames posted 08-17-2016 10:50 PM 334 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1022 days


08-17-2016 10:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: gothic arch headboard

I assume this was a piece of architectural salvage, which I don’t have the budget or source for. I have no problem doing normal furniture, but I haven’t dealt with curved or bent wood at all. Can anyone suggest a book, website, or video that I might get some guidance from? I can fake it to a certain extent (it will never be an actual window sash), but I also want it to look somewhat authentic and not cheesy. I searched the web myself but didn’t really find anything useful. I know there are some skilled craftsman here that could do it, so I figured I’d ask.

Thanks.


6 replies so far

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1022 days


#1 posted 08-18-2016 12:08 AM

I’ve been researching the info I can find. Beyond the bending and curve cutting (which may actually be the easiest part), I’m also intimidated by cutting motises in the curved stiles for the muntins. Although it’s just for looks, I think I would still need to do a mortise and tenon to hold the muntins in place. The joint where the muntins intersect looks challenging also. Joinery at anything other than 45 and 90 is just something I’ve never done. This gives me a whole new level of respect for the guys that built stuff like this back in the old days.

Anybody on here have any ideas or have done something similar?

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#2 posted 08-18-2016 01:42 AM

It’s not that difficult if you have the room to make full-size drawings. Be warned however, that it takes a LOT longer than conventional woodworking unless you’ve got a shop full of jigs and fixtures setup for this sort of work.

I have the book below and it gives a pretty good grounding in the topic.

Woodworkers Guide to Bending Wood

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#3 posted 08-18-2016 01:52 AM

Cutting the joinery on a project with curves mostly involves creating jigs to hold the parts or full size templates to transfer cut lines to the various parts.

The photo below is an in-process view of a cabinet that was delivered several weeks ago. It had something like 30 pieces of steam-bent wood. The various forms, templates and patterns required to build it pretty much filled up a dumpster by the time the job was done. I’m estimating it consumed $300 of sheet stock just for the jigs.

Unfortunately, I don’t have many pictures of the various jigs in use. That project consumed so much time I wasn’t active enough with the camera.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1022 days


#4 posted 08-18-2016 02:11 AM


Cutting the joinery on a project with curves mostly involves creating jigs to hold the parts or full size templates to transfer cut lines to the various parts.

The photo below is an in-process view of a cabinet that was delivered several weeks ago. It had something like 30 pieces of steam-bent wood. The various forms, templates and patterns required to build it pretty much filled up a dumpster by the time the job was done. I m estimating it consumed $300 of sheet stock just for the jigs.

Unfortunately, I don t have many pictures of the various jigs in use. That project consumed so much time I wasn t active enough with the camera.

- JAAune

That looks awesome. That’s so much beyond my skill level at this point. I’m gonna keep researching and maybe I’ll check out the book. Thanks

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#5 posted 08-18-2016 02:45 AM

Found a couple pictures that are worth showing.

The first one shows one of the curved pieces for the base sitting on a full-size drawing. Notice the saw kerfs on the mdf template? I just tacked the curved parts to the template with hot glue then made the cuts on a table saw sled or the miter saw. The flat edges of the template reference nicely against the fences on those two machines.

A lot of those parts were cut close to size on the bandsaw then routed to exact dimension with a flush trim bit. The patterns are usually a little longer than the parts so the router bearing won’t dig into the wood when it reaches the end of the pattern.

For wide boards I’ll rout halfway up one side using the pattern then flip the part over and come from the opposite side with a flush trim bit. The pattern is only needed for the first cut then everything else can reference off the newly-routed portions of the piece.

I’m using a laser and a CNC to make most of my patterns for the sake of speed. Everything I’ve done can be done with a pencil, rule, compass and a jigsaw so the fancy equipment isn’t a necessity.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1022 days


#6 posted 08-18-2016 04:25 AM



Found a couple pictures that are worth showing.

The first one shows one of the curved pieces for the base sitting on a full-size drawing. Notice the saw kerfs on the mdf template? I just tacked the curved parts to the template with hot glue then made the cuts on a table saw sled or the miter saw. The flat edges of the template reference nicely against the fences on those two machines.

A lot of those parts were cut close to size on the bandsaw then routed to exact dimension with a flush trim bit. The patterns are usually a little longer than the parts so the router bearing won t dig into the wood when it reaches the end of the pattern.

For wide boards I ll rout halfway up one side using the pattern then flip the part over and come from the opposite side with a flush trim bit. The pattern is only needed for the first cut then everything else can reference off the newly-routed portions of the piece.

I m using a laser and a CNC to make most of my patterns for the sake of speed. Everything I ve done can be done with a pencil, rule, compass and a jigsaw so the fancy equipment isn t a necessity.

- JAAune

Thanks. Those pics and tips are helpful.

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