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Forum topic by Maxlynch99 posted 08-16-2016 06:03 AM 608 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Maxlynch99

1 post in 112 days


08-16-2016 06:03 AM

I’m new to word working but my grandpa has a shop full of shopsmith tools including 2 table saws,bansaw,scrollsaw,joiner,wood lathe, etc. One of my problems is I dont really know where to get started. I would like to make some kind of furniture that I could later sell. Any advice?


16 replies so far

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 08-16-2016 06:52 AM

Start with safety, to avoid cutting your woodworking hobby-career short. Use push shoes. religiously. Don’t stand directly behind what you’re cutting. Wear safety glases and so forth.

The former aside, start small. For example, make part of a box. More specifically, a three sided box, the bottom of which slides under your couch, so the top can serve as a place to rest a coffee.

Next, make three boxes and stack them. Now you have a book shelf. Once you put your custom designed legs on it.

Make another box, with dados around the inside bottom and into which a floating bottom can fit, to act as drawers for the boxes you made after you rushed to the shop in response to paragraph three. Of course, it’d probably be helpful if the drawers actually fit inside the stacked boxes.

Now, make two picture frames that are an eight inch narrower and shorter than the sum of the sides of the three boxes. Then nail them onto the sides of your boxes so you now have a super, duper, extra fancy three box chest of drawers thing.

Said another way, just play.

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JoshNZ

53 posts in 532 days


#2 posted 08-16-2016 09:09 AM

I think cutting boards are a good way to get the hang of your tools/machinery. Starting at a piece of timber to a finished board will require your table saw, jointer, bandsaw if you want to be fancy, router – sure there is one laying around? Glue up and clamping practice etc. All at very little cost (especially if you stuff up) since it is a small amount of wood. Make great gifts, or sellable items if you like.

Takes fairly good accuracy with your gear to get a good result. And you can be as imaginative as you like. I made a few like Scott Lewis one below a while back.

After that, basic tables, bedside or coffee etc, start small. Then onto draws for them, with dovetail joints etc…

But as said, have fun :). Be very careful with the lathe that is the tool by far most likely to hurt you! Do plenty of reading or visit someone for a lesson. Small bowls are fun to start with.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1047 days


#3 posted 08-16-2016 12:42 PM

I like the overall approach of playing in the shop, as described by Kelly.

I personally think that selling woodshop projects is a huge hurdle. Really though, you don’t need to worry about that until you are set up to produce those things, so taking this one step at a time is the way to go.

The advice I would add is to look for a shop class to take in your area. That can accelerate your learning curve, and would also demonstrate and ingrain some super important safety techniques.

And now, I have a question for Kelly: What are push shoes?
Admittedly, I almost always have on flip-flops or running shoes, and I guess they are working fine in the shop for me. But I would like to know about a better option.
thanks

.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#4 posted 08-16-2016 03:39 PM

I call them push shoes because they have heels and I’m wanting for another description. I’ve been using them for around forty years because my saws still scare me ;)

Using push sticks, from the beginning, struck me as stupid. After all, kick backs don’t start at the front, where push sticks do their [only] work. As such, I started making push devices that extended over the boards and held down much more of of it, including the area at the back of the blade, where kickbacks start.

I still use push sticks, but mostly on the bandsaw and as a supplement to the shoes.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#5 posted 08-17-2016 12:21 PM

Start by watching several videos on safety and use of the machines – before you ever turn one on. I can’t stress this enough.

I strongly recommend watching some videos and reading. YouTube is chock full of about anything you want to do. Fine Woodworking and Popular Ww’ing are good magazines.

I think the first projects you would want to work on would be a crosscut sled for the tablesaw, followed right away by a workbench.

I think you’re jumping way ahead of yourself with furniture and trying to sell things, although something simple like a coffee table or magazine rack would probably be good starter projects.

I would focus on building skills, because without a lot of practice, you will quickly become frustrated with the quality of work you’re turning out. Simple projects like a tool tote, step stool, etc. will teach you about the basics like prepping stock, simple joinery, and the assembly process.

You also will need to learn about wood and how to store it, how to finish it, etc, etc. etc.

I am a big believe in taking hands on classes. If you have a local ww’ing club or Woodcraft store, I would check into that. Just getting around fellow ww’ers is a good thing. So far I’ve never been disappointed.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2693 days


#6 posted 08-18-2016 08:20 PM

Measure twice, cut once. Do it and do it well. Everything else depends on that simple thought.

There are lots and lots of You Tube videos. Start with the table saw and watch them over and over, especially the safety part.

IMHO, forget the selling part until you get fairly proficient and building projects. You will be amazed at how long it takes to build something.

An alternative is pallet projects. Lots of rustic stuff. Google it. Note: For everyone’s sake, please don’t build anything from pallets that will come in contact with food. Period.

Good luck.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

1439 posts in 1320 days


#7 posted 08-18-2016 09:08 PM

Don’t work with power tools when tired or sharp hand tools for that mater.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#8 posted 08-18-2016 09:54 PM

As was said before, learn the dos and don’ts related to safety. Don’t fear the machines but a healthy respect for the damage they can do is important.

I started by using good plans because I am not one of those people who can just see it and build it. I started many years ago using plans right out of Woodsmith magazine because they have very clear and exact directions and very good sections on any special techniques needed to complete the projects in the magazine. I cannot recommend Woodsmith magazine enough, especially for beginners. Lots of good information, including how to safely use most woodworking machinery. Go to their website and they will send you a free issue. You can also buy their entire back issue library on DVD too which I use constantly to research projects and techniques. It is a little pricey at $100 but I use it all the time (even though I have hard copies going back to the 80’s too).

Also, use Lumberjocks to find simple projects that you think you can handle. There are literally thousands of ideas. Start small and work up to more and more complex pieces. If want a a simple one to start wtih that is also very fun, I found this adjustable trivet on LJ and I have some explanations in the comments on how I built it.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/121778

Be safe and have fun. Welcome to Lumberjocks. You’ve come the the right place for people who will love to help you on your journey.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#9 posted 08-18-2016 10:18 PM

Steve Ramsey on Youtube has a lot of beginner projects but don’t rely on YT to learn woodworking. Take a class, read some books, or watch videos by professionals.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7167 posts in 2260 days


#10 posted 08-19-2016 02:19 PM

You should go to the ShopSmith forum and ask there. They can give you all sorts of good advice specifically related to the tools you have.
Also have a look through your grandpa’s stuff and see if there is a ShopSmith book called Power Tool Woodworking For Everyone. It is a step by step beginner’s course in woodworking with the ShopSmith that used to come with the tool. Most SS owners have one.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22005 posts in 1800 days


#11 posted 08-19-2016 02:37 PM

Study what you are doing. Everyone has a niche, so you will have to find yourself.

Welcome to Lumberjocks

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1047 days


#12 posted 08-19-2016 02:57 PM

What has come out of this thread as a discovery for me is that Shopsmith still offers their multi-tool machine.
I had no idea any one still used these, but due to this thread I googled their webpage and there it is. Who knew …

,

View jonlruss's profile

jonlruss

98 posts in 576 days


#13 posted 08-19-2016 03:06 PM

Many good suggestions here but what I’d recommend as far as building, is start with what you need for your shop. It doesn’t have to be beautiful, just functional and it’s a great way to learn. Need a tool box? Build it. Need a cabinet to hang your tools in? Build it. Need a workbench? Build it. Once you’re out of those projects, move on to things you need around the house. You’ll end up using and learning skills and techniques you’ll need for when you do move on to furniture projects. With each project you’re getting a step closer to where you want to be as a woodworker.

View gargey's profile

gargey

463 posts in 238 days


#14 posted 08-19-2016 03:06 PM

1) Just build some stuff and improve as you go

2) Safety first

3) Learn by reading as much as you can before doing anything

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#15 posted 08-20-2016 02:59 AM



You should go to the ShopSmith forum and ask there. They can give you all sorts of good advice specifically related to the tools you have.
Also have a look through your grandpa s stuff and see if there is a ShopSmith book called Power Tool Woodworking For Everyone. It is a step by step beginner s course in woodworking with the ShopSmith that used to come with the tool. Most SS owners have one.

- shipwright

If it turns out that this book is not among your grandpa’s collection, you can probably find a used copy on Amazon or eBay pretty cheap.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0835955672/ref=dp_olp_all_mbc?ie=UTF8&condition=all

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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