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Shuffleboard table bowing

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Forum topic by Nate8649 posted 08-15-2016 05:37 PM 513 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


08-15-2016 05:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shuffleboard bowed warped strips butcher board maple glue up

Hi, I’m new here and relatively new to woodworking so I’m sorry in advance if I use the incorrect terminology. I recently decided I wanted to make a shuffleboard table and have it mostly completed except for the playing surface which is where I’ve encountered a problem. The playing surface is to be roughly 12’ long, 20” wide, and 2” thick. I bought a bunch of maple boards from my local hardwood store which were planed to 3/4” thick. They didn’t have 12’ lengths so I decided to stagger strips of varying length to create the playing surface. I ripped the boards to 2.25” wide and cut them into varying length. I came up with a pattern that seemed to work and I glued all the boards together face to face in my garage. I glued 1 row at a time until I had all 25 rows glued up. I finished gluing a couple days ago but now I’ve noticed that it is bowed along the length. (Not sure if bowed is the correct word for it but basically, if I stand the glued up board on its side, the two ends will be on the ground and the middle will be roughly 1/2” off the ground.) I now realize that I should have probably been keeping track and alternating grain direction in each row but I didn’t realize that at the time. They are arranged randomly instead. It isn’t finished as I still need to plane and finish it. My questions are:
1). Is there anything I can do get this bow out? I recently moved it from my garage to inside my house as its been around 100 degrees outside with 30% humidity in my city. Would this possibly help anything?
2). If I’m screwed and there isn’t a good way to get the bow out, could I run it through a jointer to get the bend out? Do they make jointers that big?

Thank you for your help. If there is nothing I can do to fix it, I guess my shuffleboard table will just have a lot of character.


15 replies so far

View Mikenln's profile

Mikenln

8 posts in 239 days


#1 posted 08-15-2016 09:35 PM

The first thing to do is nothing. That is wait. The board may somewhat straighten out by itself.

They make jointers that might be big enough but I would use a circular saw. I can find a circular saw.

Make a straight edge using boards fastened to your shuffleboard table (I would use double sided tape). Check your straight edge carefully.

Consider making a first cut 1/8 inch away from the final position. Wait a few days before making your final cuts. The wood may move again after the first cut.

Your shuffleboard is now narrower than you wanted. You may want to add more wood to one side. If so make it at least a little oversize and wait be for trimming to final size.

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#2 posted 08-15-2016 09:44 PM

If I understand correctly and its bowed along the 12 foot length only a half inch in the center. That shouldn’t be a problem when you put it all together you can push that out easy. But I’m not sure how you build a shuffle board table.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


#3 posted 08-15-2016 10:09 PM



The first thing to do is nothing. That is wait. The board may somewhat straighten out by itself.

They make jointers that might be big enough but I would use a circular saw. I can find a circular saw.

Make a straight edge using boards fastened to your shuffleboard table (I would use double sided tape). Check your straight edge carefully.

Consider making a first cut 1/8 inch away from the final position. Wait a few days before making your final cuts. The wood may move again after the first cut.

Your shuffleboard is now narrower than you wanted. You may want to add more wood to one side. If so make it at least a little oversize and wait be for trimming to final size.
- Mikenln


Thanks for the input. I think I will wait it out a few days and see if it starts to straitened out at all from being inside instead of the garage. I figured a jointer that big would probably be hard to come by. I may go the circular saw route if it comes to that. Should I plane it before using the circular saw?


If I understand correctly and its bowed along the 12 foot length only a half inch in the center. That shouldn t be a problem when you put it all together you can push that out easy. But I m not sure how you build a shuffle board table.

- jwmalone


I’ve never made a shuffleboard table before but it’s my understanding that the board sits on the carpeted area of the table with just a couple screws to hold it in place so I can’t push it out. It’s also 2.25” thick and 20” wide so even if I could get screw it down a bunch, u wouldn’t be able to budge the board to make it strait.

I’ll try and post some pics when I get home this afternoon.

View Nate8649's profile

Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


#4 posted 08-16-2016 12:03 AM

Here are some photos to better understand how it is bowing. It’s not major but will be noticeable when it’s sitting with rails close on either side. Thanks for the help!

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#5 posted 08-16-2016 12:26 AM

O.K. I understand now.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

111 posts in 1201 days


#6 posted 08-16-2016 03:30 PM

Your picture made everything much more understandable. I get it now.

What I would do if it does not fix itself as Mikenln suggests:
1. Buy more wood to match your tabletop
2. Bring the new wood into the same environment where the tabletop is currently
3. Let the new wood acclimate to the environment for a few days
4. Glue the new wood to the tabletop sides
5. Use a circular saw to cut the tabletop to final dimensions.

You should only need an extra row or two of wood to give yourself enough space to cut off any curves and still end up with a regulation size shuffle board. Just make sure both sides are parallel.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View Nate8649's profile

Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


#7 posted 08-16-2016 04:38 PM



Your picture made everything much more understandable. I get it now.

What I would do if it does not fix itself as Mikenln suggests:
1. Buy more wood to match your tabletop
2. Bring the new wood into the same environment where the tabletop is currently
3. Let the new wood acclimate to the environment for a few days
4. Glue the new wood to the tabletop sides
5. Use a circular saw to cut the tabletop to final dimensions.

You should only need an extra row or two of wood to give yourself enough space to cut off any curves and still end up with a regulation size shuffle board. Just make sure both sides are parallel.

- Tony1212


Thanks for the input. I think this is probably what I’ll end up doing. It’s been inside for a couple days now and doesn’t seem to be changing much if any. I think I can get by adding one more row and cutting it square.

View jbay's profile

jbay

818 posts in 366 days


#8 posted 08-16-2016 04:55 PM


Thanks for the input. I think this is probably what I ll end up doing. It s been inside for a couple days now and doesn t seem to be changing much if any. I think I can get by adding one more row and cutting it square.

- Nate8649

I think I would cut it square, then add the wood back on. That way you have a consistent looking outter edge thickness, which will be the most noticeable in my opinion.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View Nate8649's profile

Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


#9 posted 08-16-2016 05:35 PM


I think I would cut it square, then add the wood back on. That way you have a consistent looking outter edge thickness, which will be the most noticeable in my opinion.

- jbay


Good idea!

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

347 posts in 1613 days


#10 posted 08-16-2016 05:43 PM

How do you plan on flattening it? From the pictures the surface looks pretty rough.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

463 posts in 368 days


#11 posted 08-16-2016 06:19 PM



How do you plan on flattening it? From the pictures the surface looks pretty rough.

- ScottM

you think a router and a planing jig?

View Nate8649's profile

Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


#12 posted 08-16-2016 06:21 PM



How do you plan on flattening it? From the pictures the surface looks pretty rough.

- ScottM


I had quite a bit of glue squeeze out while I was gluing it together and not all of the boards were perfectly strait. I used my electric hand planar to get the excess glue off so that’s why it looks rough. I plan on taking it to a local hardwood store so they can plane it and/or sand it. Once it’s uniform and looking good I am gonna use a 1/8” flood coat of epoxy which will self level and leave a smooth playing surface hopefully.

View marshallmosby56's profile

marshallmosby56

18 posts in 146 days


#13 posted 08-16-2016 08:14 PM

You could just buy extra layers of wood for your table. The layer above the swollen layer should be on the two unswollen parts until it is exactly the same height as the swell. Now fill in the center with some sort of wood glue and finally place the already acclimatised wooden layer on it.

-- :)

View MSD's profile

MSD

18 posts in 2307 days


#14 posted 08-17-2016 11:45 PM

Hey Nate,
Just a few suggestions and comments. Shuffleboard tables were built using glue and nails to assemble. The also had climate adjusters on the bottom side to correct any bowing due to humidity. I think I would let it sit for at least a month before doing anything. You can level it using a router sled and a large bit (similar to the way many level a work bench). Having refinished many tops in the past (more than 40 years ago), I found using the finish that was used on bowling alleys worked best. Yours looks very good! They are a ton of work and heavy as can be (most of ours were 22’) Biggest problem was that the tables were in bars and you can’t believe how many expert are out there when it comes to leveling and adjusting the beds. Good luck to you.

-- If it's true that we are here to help others, then what exactly are the others here for?

View Nate8649's profile

Nate8649

7 posts in 116 days


#15 posted 08-18-2016 12:10 AM


Hey Nate,
Just a few suggestions and comments. Shuffleboard tables were built using glue and nails to assemble. The also had climate adjusters on the bottom side to correct any bowing due to humidity. I think I would let it sit for at least a month before doing anything. You can level it using a router sled and a large bit (similar to the way many level a work bench). Having refinished many tops in the past (more than 40 years ago), I found using the finish that was used on bowling alleys worked best. Yours looks very good! They are a ton of work and heavy as can be (most of ours were 22 ) Biggest problem was that the tables were in bars and you can t believe how many expert are out there when it comes to leveling and adjusting the beds. Good luck to you.

- MSD


Patience isn’t my best trait but I’ll see how long I can wait before making my next move. I imagine a 22’ table is quite the project. I have my hands full with just this 12 footer. I plan on using 4 climate adjusters on the bottom. I already have the holes cut out for them. I also have 6 adjustable feet supporting the table so between those two things I’ll hopefully be able to make it level. From my understanding the climate adjusters are used to make the board very slightly concave (which you want). I don’t think they will help take out the bow that my board has but hopefully I’m wrong. I have a 100% solids bar top epoxy waiting to be used for the top. 1/8” flood coat will hopefully make for a decent playing surface. I don’t have a router so that’s not an option but I think I can get my local hardwood shop to run it through their planar which will hopefully give me a nice flat surface. I recently placed the board in place up in the table and the bow isn’t too bad. I definitely notice it but I might just leave it as is and call it a “home table advantage”.

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