LumberJocks

Ever See This Dovetail Technique?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by langski93 posted 08-15-2016 02:14 AM 783 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View langski93's profile

langski93

103 posts in 2894 days


08-15-2016 02:14 AM

Topic tags/keywords: traditional dovetail pins tails technique

I was at Jamestown VA this past week and saw this period trunk. The photos are of a dovetail technique I have never seen. It may have been common for the time, but I can’t picture how it was done. Anyone ever cut theirs like this? Were they trying to increase glue surface?

-- Langski, New Hampshire


7 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3666 posts in 1181 days


#1 posted 08-15-2016 02:29 AM

Can’t say I have seen something like that before, but sweet mother of god, that would be a nightmare to layout and the sheer number of dovetails (all of which were certainly hand-cut) would make a project like that take half of forever to complete!

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 163 days


#2 posted 08-15-2016 02:43 AM

I agree with bigblock. But man what skill that guy had. But from what I know of old techniques ill betcha the lay out is simpler than you think. Cant figure the purpose though. Bet that guys wife was real Bi&^%. He made them that way to stay in the shop longer lol.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14546 posts in 2144 days


#3 posted 08-15-2016 02:46 AM

You might want to “google” Bermuda Dovetails…..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#4 posted 08-15-2016 06:52 PM

The Japanese craftsmen do that all the time, but it is not a skill learned overnight. It takes many, many years of dedication to learn that skill.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#5 posted 08-15-2016 08:09 PM

Duplicate post

View GregTP's profile

GregTP

51 posts in 404 days


#6 posted 08-18-2016 05:05 PM

The lower picture is an interesting joint but I dont see that it becomes mechanical. More of an embellished box joint. It would be neat to see that in a dovetail shape with the wedge cut into the end of the tail. Talk about a time commitment though.

-- From exercise machine warning label: "Step ladders can cause injury and even death; the ROM machine is more dangerous than a stepladder"

View langski93's profile

langski93

103 posts in 2894 days


#7 posted 08-20-2016 02:35 AM

Greg TP I was thinking the same thing, but why would they embellish unless maybe the piece was imported from Europe. Given that Jamestown was a pretty “subsistence” place, Mr. Woodworker had to be as concerned about where he was going to get his next meal, even though there was some specialization.

Also, if anyone visits the settlement, check out the benches or pews in the meeting house. Very heavy 6/4 and 8/4 material mortised and tenoned to the floor, to itself and significant use of sliding dovetails. These are reproductions, but done in the same manner as the original. Pretty impressive.

On another note, this stopover was a history tour of battlefields and other significant spots in US history that my wife and I just took. We started at Yankee Stadium, then Valley Forge, Gettysburg, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Mount Vernon and finally Jamestown. Tremendous history Americans all share and I would recommend it to anyone.

-- Langski, New Hampshire

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com