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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 08-12-2016 11:53 PM 952 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


08-12-2016 11:53 PM

I’ve gotten set up with some coarse and fine diamond stones, and some very fine water stones, along with a couple of angle jigs for my sharpening needs. Its going better, but I still need to get better.

One thing I’m figuring out that I need is something to grind and/or re-grind bevels. I’ve had to fix a chip or straighten an edge a few times now. I did it with the angle jigs and sandpaper, working up to the stones. To labor intensive for me. I don’t do it often, but eventually my microbevels are going to grow and need to be reset, and I’m bound to cause a chip or something one of these days again.

I see the low speed grinders are in the mid $100 range. There is also a worksharp 3000 for $200. Grizzly has a tormek clone that is $200 or less if on sale. Trying to determine which might be best for me. Seems like the work sharp is a bit more flexible, as you can buy many grits of paper. But that is also more stuff to keep track of. The low speed grinder seems to be about the same cost as the other two, but less flexible. The tormek clone seems decent for the task, with no sand paper to keep track of. Its slightly less flexible since it is a fixed grit (well, 2 grits plus a strop).

I suppose if I ever got a lathe and added turning tools the tormek clone has some advantages too.

Who has used what, and what do you think?

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


18 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1642 posts in 1780 days


#1 posted 08-13-2016 12:59 AM

A standard 6” 3600rpm grinder works fine if you put a very coarse, white aluminum oxide wheel on it (36-60 grit or so). The main thing to avoid is applying heavy pressure on the tool while grinding as that’s what causes the heat to build up and damage the tool.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14571 posts in 2146 days


#2 posted 08-13-2016 01:38 AM

Maybe find one of these?

How fast it turns depends on how fast you crank.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Andre

1022 posts in 1269 days


#3 posted 08-13-2016 02:25 AM

Yep Bandit that is the best setup, I put on a white cool stone from Lee Valley on mine with a 25 degree wood platform.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1190 posts in 1357 days


#4 posted 08-13-2016 03:40 AM

I’ve got the Rikon SS grinder, which I wish was slower. Won’t buy a replacement because it works just fine, but I have to pay attention to overheating the blade more than I thought I would. Maybe I was just an idiot with how I thought about it before I got it. Someone on LJ suggested I make sure to dress the wheel often, which I now do. I haven’t had to re-grind much yet after all this dressing to see if it cools things down just a little.

Regardless, some kind of grinder – whether it’s Bandit’s Fred Flintstone Special, or a fancy pants Tormek – is a very nice thing to have. Total PITA grinding a bevel on sandpaper by hand.

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bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#5 posted 08-13-2016 01:48 PM

Thanks. Colonel Travis, i appreciate the feed back. One other thought I had was getting a cheaper grinder, and one of those variable speed devices from HF or Menards, but its lowest speed would still be higher than the Rikon slow speed grinder. So sounds like that is not the best set up either.

Bandit, how does one actually use that thing? Do you crank it up, and allow the momentum of the wheel to keep it spinning for a short time while you grind? Or do you somehow turn it and grind at the same time. I’m not sure I have the coordination for that!

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2087 days


#6 posted 08-13-2016 02:35 PM

I never use a grinder on my tools. I hate the hollow grind. All of my tools are done by hand. It is more work but I love the look, feel and strength on the edge of the tools.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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ColonelTravis

1190 posts in 1357 days


#7 posted 08-13-2016 04:03 PM

The Rikon grinder’s speed is 1750 RPM. A few years ago FWW reviewed about half a dozen grinders for woodworkers and their #1 choice was a variable speed Porter-Cable. The slowest speed on that P-C was 2000 RPM. All the others weren’t too far off from 1750, the lowest was 1720, which isn’t significantly different than the Rikon. The Rikon has been updated since that review, and I think the older version had some problems fixed by the newer one, which is the one I got. So if FWW assumes that RPM range is normal, then my expectations were clearly wrong at that price point. I didn’t want to spend any more on a grinder than I did.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

291 posts in 211 days


#8 posted 08-13-2016 05:11 PM

I use a low speed grinder from Woodcraft. I think the speed is 1850. I dress the 120 grit white wheel with a diamond faced dressing tool. With a Veritas adjustable support, I grind edges on all my turning tools quite often and also grind edges on chisels and plane irons, though that doesn’t happen often.

The Veritas tool support is an excellent addition to your grinding setup, particularly for chisels and plane irons. If there is something better, I don’t know what that might be.

When grinding chisels and plane irons, keep a shallow bowl of water next to the grinder, so you can cool the edges and not burn them.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14571 posts in 2146 days


#9 posted 08-13-2016 06:48 PM

You get the grinder moving, then a push every couple of turns to keep it going. IF you press too hard, it will stop. You can’t overheat things on one of these.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2706 days


#10 posted 08-13-2016 06:55 PM

6” and 8” bench grinders are very inexpensive at HF and because of that, having at least 2 bench grinders in your shop is a great convenience. You can fit one grinder with wheels for roughing and the other for finish grinding. Final finish can then be done by hand. Belt sanders are also great for removing material quickly. If you go the bench grinder route, the first thing to do is get rid of the wheels that come with the grinder and replace them with good quality white, aluminum oxide wheels. Wheels also come in purple, blue, ruby and green. Their colors indicate good,better and best qualities and of course are more expensive.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2706 days


#11 posted 08-13-2016 07:02 PM



Thanks. Colonel Travis, i appreciate the feed back. One other thought I had was getting a cheaper grinder, and one of those variable speed devices from HF or Menards,

Bench grinders have induction motors, so they can’t be controlled with a variable speed control; a universal (brushes) motor can.

View mike02130's profile

mike02130

95 posts in 135 days


#12 posted 08-13-2016 07:10 PM

A 6 or 8” grinder with a white wheel is standard. I also have a 12 sharpening wheel in an oil bath that I picked up for 60 bucks. It’s geared a bit slow and some day I’ll redo the pulleys. The trick is to make light passes while moving your chisel from left to right.

If you don’t mind a flat bevel, a narrow belt sander (banjo?) Works pretty well. I picked one up very cheap. It’s a Delta with a 1/4 hp motor. It really is kind of a toy but it works well. I often use that and then go to the grinder if I want a hollow grind.

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17962 posts in 2030 days


#13 posted 08-17-2016 01:03 AM

There is a lot of personal preference built into this decision. I use a grinder for so many different things. I’m not even sure how many I have.

If you’re just doing edge tools it’s hard to beat bandits suggestion.

I’ve got a grizzly slow speed with the larger wheel and water bath. It’s way to slow for me. I seldom use it and should sell it.

All of my restores gets done with a regular 8” benchtop grinder with a 150 grit white stone. My next stone purchase will be courser. I think hollow grinding is the only way to go.

I’ve never used a tormek. They probably do the job well, but always figured it was way to much money for a one trick pony. If I find one for $50 I’ll see what the fuss is about.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#14 posted 08-17-2016 02:51 AM

Don, the tormek is just like the grizzly. You won’t like it. I’ll give you $50 for you grizzly though!

I just traded my brother a buffer I wasn’t using for a regular high speed grinder he wasnt using. So I’ll give that a go for a bit.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1642 posts in 1780 days


#15 posted 08-17-2016 05:19 AM

One useful trick is to keep a thumb on the back of the blade near the bevel while grinding. Steel can handle much more heat than flesh so if your finger isn’t burning, the tool is almost sure to be fine. If it gets uncomfortable to hold the tool, it’s time to remove it and cool it with water.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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