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Poplar for a morris chair?

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Forum topic by Beginningwoodworker posted 05-29-2010 02:20 AM 1756 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3141 days


05-29-2010 02:20 AM

I am wondering could you use Poplar for a morris chair and stain it to look like Oak?


17 replies so far

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patron

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#1 posted 05-29-2010 02:26 AM

wether it is strong enough for the chair ,
i don’t know .
hang for a bit , someone is sure to have that answer .
as far as staining it ,
you can do that ok ,
but the grain may not match ?
how is the work coming for you Charles ?
any luck ?

hoping that things are good with you .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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a1Jim

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#2 posted 05-29-2010 02:27 AM

Yes you can Charles but poplar won’t hold up long term out doors. The way you make it look like oak is use some of the other Charles blotch control Charles Neil and then use the dye or stain that looks like oak.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3595 days


#3 posted 05-29-2010 02:28 AM

Poplar will work for the chair construction, but the grain and texture will never match oak.

-- 温故知新

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Dan'um Style

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#4 posted 05-29-2010 02:48 AM

poplar would look good in a Morris chair if it was painted … maybe a dark brown or cordovan, followed by garnet shellac and dark wax

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#5 posted 05-29-2010 04:00 AM

If you call it a Porris chair instead of Morris, would it be OK?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3141 days


#6 posted 05-29-2010 05:24 AM

The job search is coming ok!

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fussy

980 posts in 2518 days


#7 posted 05-29-2010 06:38 AM

CJ,

If you want to use it outside, no. If you want to use it inside, no. Poplar is strong, but not hard enough to take the slings and arrows of outrageous use. the time and money you spend trying to make it look oak will not save anything. Depending on where you love, oak can be had for about $1 – $2 a bd/ft over poplar. On a project that calls for only 30 bd/ft or so, that’s not much to save on a project to last a lifetime and beyond. There’s more to a type of wood than just color. Oak has strength, hardness, and a honest distinctive grain that fits the style of the Morris chair and imparts the sense of purpose and solidity intended by the designer and so evident in the craftsman style. Use the right wood and you’ll be happier.

STEVE

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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Eagle1

2066 posts in 2532 days


#8 posted 05-29-2010 01:03 PM

I gree with Jim & fussy. Using oak just make sure you keep a look out for weather damage starting. Put a good sealer on it, from time to time I have a outdoor bench that I redid, that a friend gave me it had oak runners on it through the iron supports. If you dont keep up on the sealer it gets pretty grey after a while..

-- Tim, Missouri ....Inside every older person is a younger person wondering what the heck happened

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#9 posted 05-29-2010 01:06 PM

The poplar we get here is pretty drab…very little grain constrast, and often has a yellowish/green tint to it. I personally wouldn’t want to go to the trouble to build a project like a Morris chair using a poplar. Oak, QSWO, or cherry or the more traditional choices for that build.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#10 posted 05-29-2010 02:20 PM

I don’t think I have ever seen a Morris chair in anything but oak. Surely, maple and many other hardwoods would be strong enough. Yet, I have never seen it in anything but oak and it is usually quarter sawn white oak.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3141 days


#11 posted 05-29-2010 05:31 PM

Thanks guys I will stick Oak or Cherry!

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David Craig

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#12 posted 05-29-2010 05:47 PM

One more wood you might want to consider Charles is Ash, especially if price is an issue. Not sure about the cost in your neck of the woods but, due to the ash borer beetle, the wood is fairly cheap in Michigan. The beetle thrives just under the bark and mills take it down to a level past where the beetle thrives so infestation of milled boards are not an issue. Ash has a similar grain pattern as Oak, is solid, and very workable. Just something to add to the think tank :)

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3141 days


#13 posted 05-29-2010 06:00 PM

I have never tought about Ash before.

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knotscott

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#14 posted 05-29-2010 06:43 PM

Ash looks a bit like oak, and is so nice to work with. I also like the idea of immortalizing a bit of endangered wood…it could be a novelty in a few decades. It’s cheaper than oak in our area.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3141 days


#15 posted 05-29-2010 07:00 PM

Thank guys for the comment, I am coming up how much bd ft I need as we speak.

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