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Saw blade for splines in miters

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Forum topic by Charles Holland posted 08-11-2016 01:06 AM 510 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charles Holland

63 posts in 160 days


08-11-2016 01:06 AM

I usually stay away from miters because most of my boxes have pictures on top. but I want to do more miters. the few times I’ve done them I’ve had success with the miter but not with miter keys(splines) I’m using a dewalt blade. i always seem to have a gap in there. I suppose I need a flat ground blade. what is a few good blade choices? is Freud Diablo ripping blades flat ground?


12 replies so far

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ShaneA

6472 posts in 2062 days


#1 posted 08-11-2016 01:10 AM

A rip blade designated as FTG should do the trick for you.

View Charles Holland's profile

Charles Holland

63 posts in 160 days


#2 posted 08-11-2016 01:24 AM

cool. I had been doing a few with my combo dewalt blade when it dawned on me that the poor results were not me but the blade. I’ll look into some rip blades.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1951 posts in 1452 days


#3 posted 08-11-2016 01:41 AM

I have a Freud full kerf rip blade t h at works well.

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

346 posts in 1610 days


#4 posted 08-11-2016 11:46 AM



I have a Freud full kerf rip blade t h at works well.

- Redoak49

Same here. I actually rarely use it for ripping…

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1459 days


#5 posted 08-11-2016 12:45 PM

Got a biscuit joiner? Those have flat top blades.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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ScottM

346 posts in 1610 days


#6 posted 08-11-2016 12:57 PM

Never thought of that. You could make a jig to hold it 90 degrees to the corner. Same sort of “cradle” for the table saw.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2102 days


#7 posted 08-11-2016 02:06 PM

I use the Freud LU87R010 which is a thin kerf flat tooth ripping blade – 24 teeth. It’s about $40 now at Amazon.

I like to be able to whittle away at things with my tennoning jig, so perfer the thin kerf. You might use more than one pass for your splines to get the kerf thickness you want. They also come in full 1/8” kerf. I don’t recall the part number.

-Paul

[edit…] The full kerf is LM72R010, about $61 at Amazon.

For thicker kerfs, look at the box-joint blade set SBOX8.

You don’t need the full height of a 10” blade. You might find a 7 1/4” flat tooth blade even cheaper.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

272 posts in 307 days


#8 posted 08-15-2016 12:30 PM

I would use one or both of the outer blades of a dado set. They are flat bottom.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7214 posts in 2839 days


#9 posted 08-15-2016 12:36 PM

The last I knew the Freud Diablo ripper uses an ATB grind, not an FTG. As mentioned, the Freud Industrial series LU87 or LM72 are FTG. So are the CMT 201.024.10/202.024.10, Infinity 010-024/010/124, Amana Tools RB1020. Some of the Bosch Pro rip blades are FTG too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Charles Holland

63 posts in 160 days


#10 posted 08-17-2016 05:21 AM

the dado blade sounds like a great idea. especially since I don’t use rip blades as of yet and I need a dado set for my porch swings. thanks!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#11 posted 08-18-2016 04:44 AM

On some dado sets, the outer blades have a beveled top on one side only—which is why you will find left and right hand blades. They will leave a Batman “ear” on your kerf. Be sure to check first.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Cooler

272 posts in 307 days


#12 posted 08-22-2016 03:06 PM



On some dado sets, the outer blades have a beveled top on one side only—which is why you will find left and right hand blades. They will leave a Batman “ear” on your kerf. Be sure to check first.

- runswithscissors

I have two Freud sets (made in Italy); both are flat bottom so I assumed that they all are. I bought the negative hook angle set for my radial arm saw and it does a better job on plywood and melamine covered particle board. The other set I had for my table saw works well too, but is not safe on the radial arm saw—which is why I have two sets.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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