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To Glue up or Not to Glue up

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Forum topic by bruc101 posted 08-10-2016 11:33 AM 668 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bruc101

1077 posts in 3004 days


08-10-2016 11:33 AM

I recently overheard a conversation about to glue up, or not to glue up panels on hot, rainy high humidity days. Since I was about three seats away from the conversation on a plane I didn’t join in the conversation.

What are your thoughts, pros and cons? In a commercial environment we have no choice and have never had any problems either way, but we do take more precautions.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org


14 replies so far

View gargey's profile

gargey

457 posts in 237 days


#1 posted 08-10-2016 12:00 PM

I wait until I am in the 100% argon hyperbaric chamber to do my glue-ups, and then leave the project in there for eternity. Take care that temperature doesn’t vary more than 1* or the wood will explode. 1 lb maple = 20,000 tons TNT, FYI.

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bruc101

1077 posts in 3004 days


#2 posted 08-10-2016 02:03 PM


I wait until I am in the 100% argon hyperbaric chamber to do my glue-ups, and then leave the project in there for eternity. Take care that temperature doesn t vary more than 1* or the wood will explode. 1 lb maple = 20,000 tons TNT, FYI.

- gargey

WOW, I’m glad you told me that. We’re planing 1500 brd feet of Maple today and have 2500 more brd feet in the warehouse. I better get busy and make sure all of our employees are wearing body armor.

I’ve got four daughters with degrees in architectural engineering. I’ll ask them if they were taught that in engineering school. I sure wasn’t taught that when I got my engineering degree in 1969..

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

754 posts in 1457 days


#3 posted 08-10-2016 02:46 PM



I wait until I am in the 100% argon hyperbaric chamber to do my glue-ups, and then leave the project in there for eternity. Take care that temperature doesn t vary more than 1* or the wood will explode. 1 lb maple = 20,000 tons TNT, FYI.

- gargey

I hope you also remembered to make the necessary sacrifice to the applicable dieties, and leave your wood to equilibrate at least three weeks between each pass through the planer. :)

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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GR8HUNTER

1134 posts in 174 days


#4 posted 08-10-2016 02:48 PM

todays glues are far better then they use to be

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1634 days


#5 posted 08-10-2016 03:15 PM

Overhearing something on a plane is almost as reliable as seeing it on the internet. I’m sure it is true.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2693 days


#6 posted 08-10-2016 03:40 PM

Well, there ya go, Bruce. The experts have spoken. :-) As for me, I never give it a second thought.

Like mentioned, the glue is awesome stuff. I have mentioned it before but I will repeat. I built a workbench in 1988 from 2×4’s and plywood for the top. Three drawers were built using Elmers glue, finishing nails and simple butt joints. The drawers held everything from clamps to hammers to boxes of nails for my framing nailer and so on. Heavy stuff.

I dismantled the bench a couple of years ago. I wanted to save the wood the drawers were made out of so…I had to beat them apart with a shop hammer! Some of the joints separated, not at the glue joint, but pulled the wood apart at the joint. The glue held fast!

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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bruc101

1077 posts in 3004 days


#7 posted 08-10-2016 04:01 PM

Thanks guys, I was just curious as how woodworkers from different locations and weather conditions did their glue ups after listening to the conversation on the plane. One of the guys was from Florida and the other one was from Germany. They both seemed to be very knowledgeable and experienced woodworkers.

It was an interesting conversation as to how they did their glue ups in two different types of weather areas using the different glues.

Elmer’s glue, I can’t imagine how many gallons of ole Elmer’s we used over the years and I never once remember hearing of a failure in one of our glue joints. I wouldn’t hesitate to use it again.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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gargey

457 posts in 237 days


#8 posted 08-10-2016 08:46 PM


I ve got four daughters with degrees in architectural engineering. I ll ask them if they were taught that in engineering school. I sure wasn t taught that when I got my engineering degree in 1969..
- bruc101

I got mine in 2005. A lot of stuff has been figured out since 1969. Microwaves, cell phones, pop tarts…

View MinnesotaSteve's profile

MinnesotaSteve

19 posts in 353 days


#9 posted 08-13-2016 05:39 AM



I got mine in 2005. A lot of stuff has been figured out since 1969. Microwaves, cell phones, pop tarts…

I’ll have you know, young man, that pop tarts were introduced in 1967!

Sheesh, you probably never heard of Hydrox cookies either… think Oreo’s are an original invention!

View SCDevil00's profile

SCDevil00

5 posts in 86 days


#10 posted 09-09-2016 07:58 PM

Where I live, if that was the determining factor for glue-ups, I would never be able to put a project together! Seems it is always humid and 10 months out of the year it is hot! Expansion joints, they are a projects best friend.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#11 posted 09-09-2016 09:26 PM

bruc101,

I am not sure that the ambient environment dictates whether to glue or not to glue, but can impact how to glue.

For example, assuming Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA) glue, glued and clamped in a small business or hobby workshop, it seems more glue can be spread and hence more joints glued when the shop is relatively cool and/or damp than when the shop is hot and/or dry. Since water is the carrier used in typical PVA glues, its rate of evaporation from the glue prior to assembly can affect the consistency of the glue and hence it’s bonding strength.

There is an interesting rather comprehensive discussion regarding adhesives and their effective application and properties for bonding wood found in Chapter 10 of the USDA’s Wood Handbook, Wood as an Engineering Material.

http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/publications/several_pubs.php?grouping_id=100&header_id=p

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#12 posted 09-09-2016 10:14 PM

Well, I guess I’ll be one of the people who agree with what you heard.

Where I live, it’s normally hot and dry so if it’s going to be unusually humid and out of the norm, I avoid working in the shop. Those are usually days following a good rain.

I just try to work the wood when it’s the most normal, weatherwise. Maybe I’m playing it too safe but in my opinion, weather extremes do affect the wood and working it during those times will lead to extra movement that might be troublesome.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#13 posted 09-09-2016 10:53 PM

I don’t have a insulated shop.I don’t do fine woodwork during the hottest part of the summer.And I am very particular during the winter.
My best times of the year are spring and fall.
I use a good variety of glues some have a short open time and some longer I will add water if need more time.

I have no degrees in anything just common sense.

Aj

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 124 days


#14 posted 09-09-2016 11:23 PM

What did they do b4 AC?? Shut down production at furniture factories if it was too humid?? I think not!!!

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