LumberJocks

Tips on plunge router cutting on 3\16" masonite hardboard

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by eegor posted 05-27-2010 01:04 AM 4838 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View eegor's profile

eegor

8 posts in 2389 days


05-27-2010 01:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: router

Hi, I’m really a noob when it comes to knowing all there is to about routing. I just know how to do my specific task but don’t know why I started getting this particular problem. I frequently cut out shapes on 3/16” masonite board (squares, circles, hearts) I’ve only been doing it for a couple months and I use a makita 3612 plunge router with a Freud1/4-Inch Diameter 2-Flute Down Spiral bit.

Now I ussually route over a spoil board and clamp the masonite down. I ussually will cut out everything in one pass. Lately I’ve been noticing that the cuts aren’t coming out as clean in the sense there is this papery residue left around the edges which I have to scrub off with a towel. (I can’t sand it because I need the surface of the masonite to stay smooth)

My question is, is it time to replace my bit already? I’ve only had it for 2 and half months and I paid 20 bucks for that thing. Or maybe its the masonite I’m buying, or is it just my technique of cutting? Any pointers? I just noticed it happening recently.


12 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#1 posted 05-27-2010 01:21 AM

Hi eegor Welcome to ljs
I think the problem your having is because you router bit is starting to dull because Masonite tends to dull blades fairly quick. I would suggest you get a diamond hone and when you start see the paper tear out hit the router bit with the hone.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View CyBorge's profile

CyBorge

79 posts in 2641 days


#2 posted 05-27-2010 01:51 AM

Is there any chance the bit is simply dirty? There was a similar thread about table saw blades just the other day.

-- "How can I be lost if I've got nowhere to go?"

View eegor's profile

eegor

8 posts in 2389 days


#3 posted 05-27-2010 02:30 AM

Thanks for the tip guys. I would have never guessed it. I will try these first before going out and spending another 20 bucks.

View eegor's profile

eegor

8 posts in 2389 days


#4 posted 05-27-2010 02:45 AM

Just wanted to let you guys know what I did. I tried cleaning the bit with some WD40 and no luck. I then decided to try cutting higher up on the bit by plunging down a lot further than where I would normally go and sure enough like a hot knife through butter. So it was a dull bit. I can’t believe it got dull that quick. I’ll probably buy a new one and get a diamond hone at the same time so I can try my luck at sharpening my own bits. Thanks again.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#5 posted 05-27-2010 02:51 AM

Your may not need a new bit if you use the hone, A better cleaner for router bits is goof off and a tooth brush.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View eegor's profile

eegor

8 posts in 2389 days


#6 posted 05-27-2010 04:59 AM

a1Jim, the bit i have is a 1/4” spiral bit. Will I be able to hone that?

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#7 posted 05-27-2010 05:03 AM

you could try it’s all carbide

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3115 days


#8 posted 05-27-2010 05:19 AM

+1 for honing. you may also want to use a brush, or scraper to scrape he gunk off the carbide tip as WD40 won’t really do much on it’s own.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#9 posted 05-27-2010 05:23 AM

Like I said Goof off and a tooth brush works great

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2597 days


#10 posted 05-27-2010 06:02 PM

There are places that will sharpen spiral bits, but they can cost $15 to get sharpened. With 1/4” bit’s it usually a better idea to just replace them.

And 2-1/2 months isn’t bad. On our CNC at work, we can go through them in a few hours. :-)

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View eegor's profile

eegor

8 posts in 2389 days


#11 posted 05-28-2010 04:07 AM

@Ger21, Wow every few hours! I guess I shouldn’t complain then lol. That’s good to know since I’ve been planning to do a DIY CNC router hopefully by the end of the year.

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2597 days


#12 posted 05-29-2010 04:45 AM

We route a lot of laminates and melamine, which is very abrasive. We also route at very high speeds. I can route about 60-80 4×8 sheets of parts a day. We change the bit every day, and they’re $80-$100 each. If we’re cutting laminated sheets, the bit will have a deep groove worn into the carbide after 3 or 4 hours.

Keep in mind, though, that in one day we route more than my homebuilt router will do in 6 months.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com