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Pneumatic nailer question

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Forum topic by jtriggs posted 08-08-2016 03:26 PM 402 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtriggs

142 posts in 3278 days


08-08-2016 03:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finish nailer porter cable

I’ve got a 16 ga. Porter Cable finish nailer that went belly up yesterday. The nail striker won’t retract. It has been a very reliable nailer for years so this bums me out in the middle of a commissioned project. I believe it was a model FN250A and I’ve got thousands of nails for it of different lengths. The current model is a 250C and I see some bad reviews on Amazon for this model but a lot of good ones too.

Does anyone have any experience with the newer model or is there a better model out there that will take the same nails so I can keep using up my stock?

Thanks a bunch for any help on this.
Jon

-- Jon --Always remember, never live your life by a motto.


14 replies so far

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GR8HUNTER

1134 posts in 173 days


#1 posted 08-08-2016 03:31 PM

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JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#2 posted 08-08-2016 03:38 PM

Most pneumatic nailers are very easy and relatively inexpensive to repair. Are you sure it’s toast or can it be fixed? Any DeWalt authorized service center can take a look and repair, if you are close to one and not comfortable tearing into it yourself. They could also replace seals and o-rings and have you as good as new. A refurbished pneumatic nailer will last as long as a new one

If you do need to replace, most of the 16ga straight finish nailers will use the same nails, so it shouldn’t be an issue. PC, DeWalt, Senco, Hitachi, Makita, Paslode, Grip-Rite and many more have models that will work.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View jbay's profile

jbay

809 posts in 360 days


#3 posted 08-08-2016 03:55 PM

Very easy to repair. Just pop the top off, find the offensive part/seal and look it up.

You can look at the symptoms on the right side of the page and it will give you some parts for you to check.

I’m waiting for an O ring to fix my pin nailer as we speak. It was the O ring on my driver pin.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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mike02130

95 posts in 133 days


#4 posted 08-08-2016 04:00 PM

Buy an older American made Senco. They can be had at a reasonable price. I see many lightly used. Better than anything new.

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#5 posted 08-08-2016 07:18 PM

You apparently experienced failure of the PC “bumper” (a cheap piece of plastic that seems to disintegrate with time). I did the coin-flip on mine last year and repaired it. Parts and shipping were outrageous (typical for PC parts I think) but it was a solid tool and I hated the idea of tossing it. I needed an impact driver to remove the screws to get at it (top only) but gave me a good idea of how they work. If you decide to repair…one word of advice is to get a spotless floor and work surface…that air deflection thing on the top contains a tiny spring and a tiny BB that will want to “wander” when removed. As for the nails you have, I don’t think there is any issue with crossing brands on 18/16/15 ga. nails. Pretty generic I think. Framing guns the same other than a few different methods come into play (paper/plastic/wire, etc.) that are specific to the tool.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4449 posts in 3421 days


#6 posted 08-08-2016 08:06 PM

Buy a rebuild kit and go back to work. Inexpensive and easy. Quit frettin’ about it.
You DO oil the nailer don’t ya??
Mine are 20 yrs. old, and still work like new ‘cause I maintain them.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#7 posted 08-08-2016 08:09 PM



Buy a rebuild kit and go back to work. Inexpensive and easy. Quit frettin about it.
Bill

- Bill White

Where you find an “inexpensive” re-build kit? As for “easy”, I would say “some tools required”.

View jtriggs's profile

jtriggs

142 posts in 3278 days


#8 posted 08-08-2016 08:41 PM

Thanks all! Looks like a repair is in my near future. I’ll tear it down tonight to confirm it is the bumper. I’ll get it cleaned out and wait for the replacement part. I see they’re not too much on ereplacementparts.com. They even had a video on the tear down and rebuild. Piece of cake.

Thanks again.

-- Jon --Always remember, never live your life by a motto.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#9 posted 08-08-2016 11:42 PM

Don’t know what you’re building, but I have all P.C. guns including framing, 16 gauge, 18 gauge, and 23 gauge. I haven’t touched the 16 gauge since I got an 18 gauge many years ago. They are lighter and much nicer to work with. Unless you are hanging a door, you won’t notice the difference in holding power.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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jtriggs

142 posts in 3278 days


#10 posted 08-09-2016 03:07 PM

Part is ordered and should have it fixed this week. I couldn’t believe the gun worked at all. The piece that was broken was in a thousand little plastic pieces. I think it was called the piston stop.

Other than that the gun was in very good shape. Very clean inside, nice film of oil on everything.

What type of grease should I use on the o-rings as I reassemble the gun?

Thanks again, all.

-- Jon --Always remember, never live your life by a motto.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

1134 posts in 173 days


#11 posted 08-09-2016 03:11 PM

porter cable makes very good guns …....... as good as senco ….......gratz Jon

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#12 posted 08-09-2016 05:39 PM

I think most kits come with the o-ring lubricant.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#13 posted 08-09-2016 07:36 PM



Part is ordered and should have it fixed this week. I couldn t believe the gun worked at all. The piece that was broken was in a thousand little plastic pieces. I think it was called the piston stop.

Other than that the gun was in very good shape. Very clean inside, nice film of oil on everything.

What type of grease should I use on the o-rings as I reassemble the gun?

Thanks again, all.

- jtriggs

They will continue to work without that piece, just a lot slower since you have to manually retract the driver! And yeah, when they go they leave no doubt about the fact that they are gone. I’ve seen a lot of posts on that part that will blame the lack of oil or the wrong oil or something else…I think it is strictly a function of the amount of beating that thing takes over time but what do I know. As long as you are waiting, clean out the barrel best you can (I use drug store alcohol a lot because it cleans, dries quick, leaves no residue and doesn’t harm your O-rings)...on re-assembly I’d just use a light film of the air-tool oil you have been using. Once put back together that’s all it’s going to get going forward.

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jtriggs

142 posts in 3278 days


#14 posted 08-10-2016 12:24 AM

Teejk, That was what I was thinking, too.
Thanks.

-- Jon --Always remember, never live your life by a motto.

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