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Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 08-07-2016 07:14 PM 460 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1131 days


08-07-2016 07:14 PM

I’m working on a room in our house that is going to be a wildly multi-purpose room. Makerspace / kids play room / school supplies, etc. It’s coming together, but I sure could use a whole bunch of shallow wooden trays.

I’m thinking 1/4” BB with as little wasted space as possible. Consider the dimensions like 12” x 7”, and 3/4” to 2” tall. Because of the shallow height, I’d hate to do a dadoed bottom.

My shop drawers are 1/2” BB with butt joints glued and stapled, with 1/2” BB bottom that is glued and stapled as well. The simplicity/speed of assembling these has been nice and while nothing to be proud of design-wise, they are sturdy and practical. I’m hoping to do something similar here, but 1/2” may be a waste on these small trays.

How would you design/build such boxes, in a situation where practicality is greater than feng shui?

Among other uses, they will be replacing these dark half-pencil-boxes, and allow me to create dividers easily. (also, these half pencil boxes are still far too tall considering their contents.)

.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com


14 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3180 days


#1 posted 08-10-2016 05:24 AM

I think 1/2 inch is too heavy, I’d go 1/4 inch. You could probably just glue and brad nail ‘em all together so they’d go together fast.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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Jon Hobbs

52 posts in 172 days


#2 posted 08-10-2016 07:47 PM

First, put a red door on it. Oh, wait. You said no feng shui…

I agree that 1/4” material for space-saving purposes would be ideal. However, you used the words “wildly” and “kids”. That says to me: “durability”.

I’d be tempted to use 1/2” material for the sides/front/back and 1/4” for the bottoms. Maybe rabbet the bottom-inside edge of the sides/front/back to hide the edges of the bottom. You’d use a little height, but not as much as doing a dadoed bottom.

If you want to stick with 1/4” all around, I’d probably use a tongue and groove type joint at the corners of the box. Cut an 1/8” saw kerf vertically, 1/8” in from the ends of each side. Put a 1/8” x 1/8” rabbet vertically on the end of each front & back. Now you have a little tongue on the fronts and backs that’ll fit into the groove on the sides. You could use a similar approach for attaching the bottom without loosing too much height, but gaining a bit more strength over glue and brads alone.

Top view:

-- Jon -- Just a Minnesota kid hanging out in Kansas

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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1131 days


#3 posted 08-10-2016 09:26 PM

Ah yes, I used the same concept for some quick drawers for my basement island, but with 1/2” BB. Lock-rabbets I think?

1/8” is a convenient width to work with on the table saw, so I like your idea of using this here. Plus, it would help with speedy alignment/assembly.

I’ll go with this. Thanks!

I’ll also give brad-nailing a try. I already have enough trouble with brad nailing 1/2”, so 1/4” will be good target practice and/or help support the local hospital.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

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bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#4 posted 08-10-2016 09:54 PM

I’d go w/ 1/4” ply bottoms just glue and nail them to the bottom with out putting them in a dado and they will be fine. I’ve done it many times on shop drawers never had a failure.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Jon Hobbs

52 posts in 172 days


#5 posted 08-11-2016 04:25 PM



Ah yes, I used the same concept for some quick drawers for my basement island, but with 1/2” BB. Lock-rabbets I think?

Yes! Lock-rabbets, that’s the word I was looking for :)


1/8” is a convenient width to work with on the table saw, so I like your idea of using this here. Plus, it would help with speedy alignment/assembly.

Exactly!


I ll go with this. Thanks!

You’re welcome! I hope it turns out well


I ll also give brad-nailing a try. I already have enough trouble with brad nailing 1/2”, so 1/4” will be good target practice and/or help support the local hospital.

You could do both. Lock-rabbets reinforced with brads. Aim true, shoot straight ;)

-- Jon -- Just a Minnesota kid hanging out in Kansas

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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1131 days


#6 posted 08-11-2016 08:05 PM



You could do both. Lock-rabbets reinforced with brads. Aim true, shoot straight ;)

...and have an angle grinder w/ cutoff disc handy.

So far this has been working well. I haven’t glued or nailed yet, but I was able to turn out a LOT of parts at once. Rip a couple strips of BB, dado sides of one entire strip w/ full kerf blade, rabbet the sides of another entire strip, then use a stop block on my crosscut sled set to the height of the trays.

I’m going un-’merican and using mm for the tray heights in order to have equal clearance from the above shelf & pegs regardless of height. The magic number is a multiple of 32mm, followed by +8mm. So heights are 40mm, 72mm, 104mm, etc.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Jon Hobbs's profile

Jon Hobbs

52 posts in 172 days


#7 posted 08-18-2016 03:28 PM


So far this has been working well. I haven t glued or nailed yet, but I was able to turn out a LOT of parts at once. Rip a couple strips of BB, dado sides of one entire strip w/ full kerf blade, rabbet the sides of another entire strip, then use a stop block on my crosscut sled set to the height of the trays.

It’s amazing what happens when you chose the “right” dimensions. Production becomes muy efficient! It’s something I try to consider at the design phase. Sometimes aesthetics still trumps production efficiency, but it can be handy to dimension things with an eye toward the build process.


I m going un- merican and using mm for the tray heights in order to have equal clearance from the above shelf & pegs regardless of height. The magic number is a multiple of 32mm, followed by +8mm. So heights are 40mm, 72mm, 104mm, etc.

Brilliant! Have you heard of the 32mm system? Very popular in Europe.

-- Jon -- Just a Minnesota kid hanging out in Kansas

View Richard's profile

Richard

1907 posts in 2158 days


#8 posted 08-18-2016 03:47 PM


Ah yes, I used the same concept for some quick drawers for my basement island, but with 1/2” BB. Lock-rabbets I think?

1/8” is a convenient width to work with on the table saw, so I like your idea of using this here. Plus, it would help with speedy alignment/assembly.

I ll go with this. Thanks!

I ll also give brad-nailing a try. I already have enough trouble with brad nailing 1/2”, so 1/4” will be good target practice and/or help support the local hospital.

- Keith Kelly


STAPLES hold better in 1/4” plus adding glue will help even more.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#9 posted 08-18-2016 04:18 PM

I used bread loaf tins (available at Walmart for 88¢ each. I built large rectangles about 1/4” wider than the tins. I made slots in the verticals on the table saw and the tins slide in and out like a drawer.

I cut the slots first on a wide board, then cut it to size afterwards. In that way I was assured that the lefts and rights line up.

I made several holders in a morning and had them filled in the afternoon.

Here is the loaf tin: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-Bread-and-Loaf-Pan-with-Handles/20692196

Strong and light, but not perfectly corrosion resistant. The zinc plating is a bit thin, But I only see small spots of rust. But this is much more rugged than the plastic trays out there.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1131 days


#10 posted 08-18-2016 04:20 PM


Brilliant! Have you heard of the 32mm system? Very popular in Europe.


yep, I like the concept and have a fastcap 32mm tape to work with this system when needs arise.


STAPLES hold better in 1/4” plus adding glue will help even more.

Oh no. Remorse. I used pin nails. For the larger boxes, I’ll use staples.

Here are the trays so far. I decided to go the unfinished route so that it’s much faster and I can modify them in the future easily (glue in dividers).

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1131 days


#11 posted 08-18-2016 04:29 PM


I used bread loaf tins (available at Walmart for 88¢ each. I built large rectangles about 1/4” wider than the tins. I made slots in the verticals on the table saw and the tins slide in and out like a drawer.

I cut the slots first on a wide board, then cut it to size afterwards. In that way I was assured that the lefts and rights line up.

I made several holders in a morning and had them filled in the afternoon.

Here is the loaf tin: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-Bread-and-Loaf-Pan-with-Handles/20692196

Strong and light, but not perfectly corrosion resistant. The zinc plating is a bit thin, But I only see small spots of rust. But this is much more rugged than the plastic trays out there.

- Cooler

Ooh very nice! I used the same workflow for creating a similar shelf for organizer compartments, cut-in-half school pencil boxes, and drawer dividers. But I have not considered the bread tins – yes, rugged and cheap, drawer style, and single-compartment. Those would slide very nicely. I will surely be using those in the future instead of some of the deeper boxes I was planning on building. Thanks for the tip and link. When you said bread tins for $0.88, I was thinking foil, but those are solid rugged tins.

I’m assuming spray paint would help prevent rust.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Jon Hobbs's profile

Jon Hobbs

52 posts in 172 days


#12 posted 08-24-2016 02:49 PM

Looking good!

I see headers and hook-up wire! What kind of fun and games are those destined for? I’ve just started messing with Raspberry Pi’s and Arduinos with my 2 boys. Lots of headers and hook-up wire in our future!

-- Jon -- Just a Minnesota kid hanging out in Kansas

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#13 posted 08-24-2016 06:18 PM

I used bread loaf tins (available at Walmart for 88¢ each. I built large rectangles about 1/4” wider than the tins. I made slots in the verticals on the table saw and the tins slide in and out like a drawer.

I cut the slots first on a wide board, then cut it to size afterwards. In that way I was assured that the lefts and rights line up.

I made several holders in a morning and had them filled in the afternoon.

Here is the loaf tin: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-Bread-and-Loaf-Pan-with-Handles/20692196

Strong and light, but not perfectly corrosion resistant. The zinc plating is a bit thin, But I only see small spots of rust. But this is much more rugged than the plastic trays out there.

- Cooler

Ooh very nice! I used the same workflow for creating a similar shelf for organizer compartments, cut-in-half school pencil boxes, and drawer dividers. But I have not considered the bread tins – yes, rugged and cheap, drawer style, and single-compartment. Those would slide very nicely. I will surely be using those in the future instead of some of the deeper boxes I was planning on building. Thanks for the tip and link. When you said bread tins for $0.88, I was thinking foil, but those are solid rugged tins.

I m assuming spray paint would help prevent rust.

- Keith Kelly

1. They are probably strong enough to stand on if you turn them upside down. Certainly strong enough for parts.
2. The amount of rust is minimal and I would not paint them. I think paint would make the sliding less slick.
3. There is nothing for the price that approaches this value.
4. I also got a couple of “large muffin” tins that are pretty ideal for small parts. Sturdy and cheap.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1131 days


#14 posted 09-16-2016 03:05 PM



Looking good!

I see headers and hook-up wire! What kind of fun and games are those destined for? I ve just started messing with Raspberry Pi s and Arduinos with my 2 boys. Lots of headers and hook-up wire in our future!

- Jon Hobbs

Many things practical, and some things not. Here’s one that’s very practical. 2 Arduino Nanos + GPS + OLED + NeoPixels + Piezo + Rotary Encoder. It’s a speed alert device. Here, it’s set to 40mph. If I go 41-45, the neopixels will flash orange and the piezo will buzz. If I go 46 or over, the neopixels will light up the car with a frightful custom animation set that looks like those new LED lights on top of police cars. The rotary encoder allows configuration. This helps me avoid getting carried away in the flow of the other speeding cars.

The Legos were intended to be a temporary solution until parts arrive for a more permanent mount. But I have developed an appreciation for them and won cool-uncle points from my nephews. So this might be closer to the final product than I had anticipated.

You’ll enjoy your Pi and Arduino future. Be sure to print some pinouts and power supply specs for the different types of Arduinos you own. That’ll save you from a good deal of grief.

.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

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