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Can a blade be the cause of out of square?

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Forum topic by skatefriday posted 08-07-2016 06:41 PM 983 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skatefriday

380 posts in 948 days


08-07-2016 06:41 PM

I spent a good portion of yesterday trying to figure out why my
table saw decided to stop cutting square. Checked miter slot to blade
and it’s about .004” out with a dial gauge. Couldn’t get it any closer,
checked the incra miter to it’s slot still got cuts that were not square.

Today I swapped out the blade and I got a square cut. Both blades
are quality, but the first was sharpened recently by a local sharpening shop.


9 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7176 posts in 2043 days


#1 posted 08-07-2016 07:12 PM

I had a similar problem and put the blade in question on a marble slab and used

feeler gauges to find out I bent the blade. Oops

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skatefriday

380 posts in 948 days


#2 posted 08-07-2016 07:19 PM

Interesting.

I wonder if the sharpening shop could have knocked it out of square? It’s a Freud Industrial 80 tooth. The other blade (that’s cutting square) is a CMT 80 tooth that’s never seen a sharpening shop.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#3 posted 08-07-2016 07:49 PM

What do you mean by “square”? blade 90° to the miter gauge or 90° to the table top?

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skatefriday

380 posts in 948 days


#4 posted 08-07-2016 07:50 PM

Professional. I saw his shop.

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pete724

36 posts in 275 days


#5 posted 08-10-2016 08:54 AM



What do you mean by “square”? blade 90° to the miter gauge or 90° to the table top?

- MrRon

Explain!

Rip cut not straight?
crosscut not 90 degree to edge?
Saw marks on the cut edge?

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#6 posted 08-10-2016 07:52 PM

If switching blades fixes the problem, then the blade is obviously the problem.

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 365 days


#7 posted 08-10-2016 09:05 PM

A bent blade is only going to cut a wider kerf. It may try to push the board aside but I don’t think so, could depend on how bent the blade is. (Think wobble dado blade)
If your using a miter gauge then I would attribute it more to your not holding the wood tight against the miter gauge and it’s moving as your making the cut.
Possible that the new blade is cutting cleaner so it’s easier to hold true?
Hard to say without being there and seeing what you are doing.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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skatefriday

380 posts in 948 days


#8 posted 08-11-2016 12:24 AM

Crosscut not 90 degree using an incra miter gauge. The bad blade should be sharper than the CMT that’s cutting straight. Yeah, I can’t really explain it either.

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pete724

36 posts in 275 days


#9 posted 08-12-2016 09:04 AM



Crosscut not 90 degree using an incra miter gauge. The bad blade should be sharper than the CMT that s cutting straight. Yeah, I can t really explain it either.

- skatefriday

That helps actually.

Blade is either bent OR
not fitting on the arbor properly.

As Jbay said;

It SHOULD just make a wider kerf BUT the wobble will push the workpiece “sliding along the miter fence” then spring back.

Under those conditions (wobbling) it would be near impossible to hold the workpiece fixed to the fence with just your hands. Especially so if the blade is thin and raised higher than it needs to be. (flexing blade combined with wobble).

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