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Difference between Festool Drills

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Forum topic by Warren posted 05-21-2010 09:17 AM 14030 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Warren

57 posts in 2745 days


05-21-2010 09:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: drill festool c15 t15 difference question comparison drill driver

Hi all,

I’m looking at buying a new Festool drill, (I know they are crazy expensive!), but I am undecided over whether to purchase the C15 or the T15 mainly because I really cant see much significant difference between the two other than the handle. Having said that I am quite positive that there is a simple and obvious difference that my small brain has yet to grasp and so I thought I would expose myself to a humbling in front of the Lumberjock community by asking you all:

What is the difference between the two drills?

Technical Data for the C15

Battery voltage 14,4 V
Idling speed, 1st gear/2nd gear 0-450/0-1500 min-1
Drilling diameter, wood/steel 35/16 mm
Torque adjustment 0,5-8/0,5-6 Nm
Max. torque, wood/steel 25/40 Nm
Chuck range 1,5-13 mm
Li-Ion battery capacity 2,6 Ah
Charging time Li Ion 45 min
Weight with Li Ion 1,6 kg

and for the T15

Battery voltage 14,4 V
Idling speed, 1st gear/2nd gear 0-450/0-1500 min-1
Drilling diameter, wood/steel 35/16 mm
Torque adjustment 0,5-8/0,5-6 Nm
Max. torque, wood/steel 27/40 Nm
Chuck range 1,5-13 mm
Li-Ion battery capacity 2,6 Ah
Charging time Li Ion 45 min
Weight with Li Ion 1,5 kg

Surely it can not only be the 2Nm difference in torque and 100 grams of weight!

The ridicule may now begin…................

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture


14 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

5032 posts in 3360 days


#1 posted 05-21-2010 01:19 PM

I have slowly been replacing my tools as they die with Festool and your right, they are crazy expensive but the only one or should I say that the last one I would get is the drill and for one reason….............look at the wieght of it. hugely heavy and when combined with the size of it (big) I just cant see developing tendonitus for the sake of that drill.

they arent like routers that have rachets, easy .o1mm adjustments without unlocking it, they arent like the track saw or the K2…...........they only drive and drill and the wieght is just too much.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2541 days


#2 posted 05-21-2010 03:07 PM

I recently found a used TDK 15.6 drill on e-bay and I was able to buy it a reasonable price. This is a predecessor to the current models they are selling. I think the biggest difference is this model uses Ni-Cad batteries instead of the more modern Li-Ion batteries.

I have not compared specifications but it feels like it has more power than my 18 volt drill and the various heads are very convenient. It is a very well made drill.

However, this drill is heavy. Of course, mine is even heavier because of the Ni-Cad.

FYI – I also have a 12 volt Hitachi with Li-Ion batteries. I bought just because it is so lightweight and seems to have very good balance. I opt for the 12 volt when that is all I need and use the festool for the heavy duty jobs and jobs that benefit from the extra heads.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3115 days


#3 posted 05-21-2010 03:21 PM

I’m assuming you refer to the T15+3. this drill has brushless motor which is less prone to long term maintenance and failures. the C15 I believe is the regular motor with brushes that require changing periodically.

all the major brands (including Festool – they were not the first) are starting to move to brushless motor design.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Warren 's profile

Warren

57 posts in 2745 days


#4 posted 05-21-2010 03:40 PM

OK, now I am even more confused…..

Moron, I checked, if you compare the drill size to pretty much any Dewalt drill (a roughly equivalent brand) they are about 50% lighter (5lbs to 3lbs) and definitely significantly smaller and PurpLey they are both brushless!

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture

View thatwoodworkingguy's profile

thatwoodworkingguy

375 posts in 2396 days


#5 posted 05-21-2010 06:18 PM

I have been wondering this also.

-- thatwoodworkingguy.com ~Eagle America~ ~Woodcraft~

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#6 posted 05-21-2010 06:27 PM

Sorry guys I just don’t see the point in spending 3 times what other good brands cost for a festool I have 6 Dewalt 18volt drills and even in screwing down tons of decks they last up to 10 years ,If you have a disability and you need and extra light drill it might make sense but really 1lb difference is not a big issue. So I would take the extra $250 and buy another tool you need.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3115 days


#7 posted 05-21-2010 06:31 PM

I’ll second Jim.

Festool vacuums – fantastic
Festool Tracksaws- fantastic – but already there are alternatives
Festool routers – great quality – but there are other alternatives
Festool Drill/drivers – I just don’t get the point of spending that much for a drill/driver when there are other options in the market just as good, for half/third the cost – unless you’re getting royalties from Festool ;)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1510 posts in 3591 days


#8 posted 05-21-2010 08:39 PM

Looks like the handle style is the primary difference. I have the C12, and like that extra ring around the handle, both because it’s a good place to stash driver bits, but also because it offers a little extra protection around my hand when I do something stupid (like try to use that drill on low speed mode to drive a 1½” auger bit because the 12v NiCad drill has got more torque than my plugged in DeWalt…).

Once again I’ll ask, to people worried about the price, where do you buy your lumber? I have a Festool shop, I’m just a hobbyist, I buy a lot of my wood at firesale prices off of Craigslist, and the cost of wood, an expense, dwarfs the capital costs of my tools.

On other reasons I like having the Festool drill: The right angle and offset chucks have made things easier a number of times, and when I get to building my workshop (which I’d hoped to be working on now, but an injury has delayed it) I’ll be getting the drywall screw chuck.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Greedo's profile

Greedo

470 posts in 2427 days


#9 posted 05-21-2010 08:46 PM

i had my mind set up about going festool for all my next tools after using some at school, but then through curcomstances i bought a new professional Bosch sander wich to my surprise was just better than the brand new festool i used in school, and for almost half the price. so i saved over $250 AND i have a tool that to me functions better.
even if their drill is better than the rest, does that justify paying so much more to make work occasionally more easy.

View Warren 's profile

Warren

57 posts in 2745 days


#10 posted 05-22-2010 02:18 AM

While I appreciate that Festool tools do generate a lot of debate what I am really trying to determine is the difference between their two types of drill.

My reasons for going with Festool are quite simply that a) I already own a significant number of Festool products and have never had even the slightest problem in terms of performance or reliability and b) I live in Spain and the other brands you talk of aren’t that different in price here.(sometimes $200 more than they cost in the US or the UK) although I have considered buying abroad and shipping it can be both expensive and in some case risky due to all this new funky battery technology and differing, unreliable currents in Spain.

I agree with everyone that I could get a cheaper drill, but I’m not going to because I really like the idea of a drill that will screw 1,000,000 screws and still run just fine!

So, even though I am sure that my response will now generate even more debate and all of you are right in one area or another, can anyone just tell me the difference between Festools two drills?

Sorry, to appear ungrateful of your input. I’m really not its just that this debate has and will continue forever. (or until we all buy Festools :))

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture

View Warren 's profile

Warren

57 posts in 2745 days


#11 posted 05-22-2010 01:37 PM

unfortunately that isn’t correct, they both have brushless motors now. Do resolve the riddle I have written to Festool to get an explanation from them. I will post whatever they come back with

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2541 days


#12 posted 05-22-2010 03:53 PM

In defense of festool. 11 years ago I bought a new BMW motorcycle. I could have purchased a comparable Japanese model for quite a bit less. The BMW was served me very well and I literally believe I will continue to ride it for the rest of my life (hopefully another 20 – 30 years). It still has a great resale value but I would never sell it. I highly doubt that I would feel the same way about my bike today if I had purchased a Japanese bike.

I’m also the second owner of a 33 year old BMW motorcycle. The original owner only sold it because of deteriorating health. It still runs great and I think I will keep it until I die. It’s value is actually going up.

Note that BMW motorcycles and festools are both headquartered in the same city in Germany.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Warren 's profile

Warren

57 posts in 2745 days


#13 posted 05-25-2010 07:48 AM

Well, the reply is back and im not sure what to make of it…...........

Hello Warren, Thank you for your E-mail, you have posed a very interesting question that is frequently asked, faced with predominantly screw driving the “C” series offers you the

ability to put pressure single handed on the centre line of the chuck whilst driving screws into timber, whereas with the “T” configuration sometimes requires 2 hands to exert the

same pressure and flexibility.

Therefore to summarise the nature of your work will tell you the tool most suited to your applications, is it predominantly hole drilling or driving screws?

Should you have more questions please do not hesitate to contact me.

Best regards
Graham Bickerdike

So, I guess that means they made the T series more difficult to use!

The C series it is

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture

View jensen's profile

jensen

8 posts in 2866 days


#14 posted 05-25-2010 09:54 AM

What they mean is that your palm can be placed on the very upper back part of the drill, which makes the pushing force in-line with the screw being driven. For example, I have 2 c12 drills, and when I use them my middle, or ring finger is pressing the trigger while my index finger is pointing to the screw being driven. It is just very comfortable for me, and more natural. The T series is not made to be more difficult, its just the traditional style drill that a lot of people like. The diffrence in the 2 drills is just the handle style, plus the c15 has the LED light and the T drills dont. As for me, the triangle design of the c12 and 15 is superrior to any T style drill. The driver becomes more a part of your hand, well balanced, easy to control, easy on the wrist. Go and try it out and see what you like, but this is my reasons for owning the c 12 (I also have the t15 but my c12 is the go to drill, until I get the c15) Good luck!

-- jensen smith, Derby ks. " if you think you can, you can; if you think you cant, your right!"

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