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Router collet nut stuck

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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 08-01-2016 07:16 PM 313 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

800 posts in 1570 days


08-01-2016 07:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question router tra001 triton collet

I’ve got a Triton TRA001 3.25 hp table-mounted router, and somehow the 1/2” collet nut became completely stuck on the shaft. The last two times I changed bits, the collet nut was harder than usual to release – I had to use the wrench for the entire process, instead of my fingers.

I thought the problem might have been dust or debris on the collet nut or the shaft threads, so I cleaned them off and tried another bit. I wasn’t able to tighten the collet enough to secure the bit, and when I tried to back the collet off it just flat out stuck. There’s no bit in it, the collet is just totally stuck on the shaft – to the point where the collet lock mechanism gives before the collet nut loosens. It is so stuck that the collet wrench bent when I tried to unscrew the collet nut; I tried a vice grips, and that’s when the collet lock pin gave out.

Now, I have no idea how to get this collet off the router. Any ideas as to (a) what I can do to get this thing off, and (b) what might have caused the problem in the first place? Presumably I’ll need to replace the collet, but I really don’t want to have to replace the entire router.

Thanks!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


5 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#1 posted 08-01-2016 08:20 PM

I have the smaller Triton MOF001, and if yours is made similar, I have a suggestion. The shaft lock is a round piece that sticks into a blind hole machined into the shaft on mine, there are 2 of these holes. I’m thinking if you can secure the shaft from rotating (not using the built in shaft lock) and use a mechanics wrench on the nut you might be able to get it loose. This type of wrench will hold the shaft (just tried it on mine, it takes 3 hands, but works) and then you could use the mechanics combo wrench on the nut. If that’s not the way yours is made, I’ve wasted your time (sorry). But you also said there wasn’t a bit in the tcollet…maybe that’s why it’s stuck so firmly(?). I’d like to hear the final outcome in any case. That spanner I linked may be available in a much cheaper version (Harbor Freight) and the pin need to be sized to fit into that blind hole.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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ADHDan

800 posts in 1570 days


#2 posted 08-01-2016 08:29 PM

Sounds like our locking mechanisms are similar – a metal pin that locks into the shaft. Any suggestions for locking the shaft without using the built-in pin lock? I don’t think there’s a flat part on the shaft that could be locked by a separate wrench (i.e., like on routers that require two wrenches to change bits). Do you have any ideas for what might make a better pin?

If I can figure out a way to lock the shaft without the built-in pin, I’ll give it another shot with the vice grips and/or pick up a spanner, and give it sharp raps with a hammer. That might work better than just steady increasing pressure.

I’m wide open to any other suggestions, too. I don’t mind replacing the collet, so if necessary maybe I could carefully cut into it (e.g. with an oscillating tool) and then crack it apart with a screwdriver, or some other sort of wedge?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#3 posted 08-02-2016 01:20 AM

ADHDan,

I have no experience this router collet problem nor do I have a Triton router so my comments may be of limited value. Since there is nowhere to grip the router shaft when changing router bits and the stop pin is bent or broken, it may be time for a new router. In the router repairs I have done, I find the parts to be quite expensive and my router was far from new. But if the collet nut can be dislodged, no damage is evident on the router shaft, and you elect to replace the stop pin, I would buy the Triton replacement parts rather than spend a lot of effort trying to retrofit components. But then I have very limited metal working capability.

Thinking about why the collet could be so firmly stuck, it seems there are three possible causes.

The first is the cone in the collet is driven into the inner wall of the collet nut and thus causing the collet nut to seize. Soaking the collet cone with penetrating oil might be enough to release the cone. However, it is hard to image that this would resist the kind of force you have applied.

If the router shaft has been damaged and is no longer round, I could see how the collet nut could seize. A close visual inspection or maybe several caliper measurements of the diameter of shaft around the shaft as close to the collet nut as possible could confirm the router shaft remains round.

The third and perhaps most likely cause could be cross threading of the collet nut or crushed threads somewhere on the shank or collet nut. Before cutting off the collet nut, soaking the collet threads with penetrating oil, allowing the oil to run down the router shaft into the threads could help a little. After a good soak, perhaps a few light raps to the end of the collet (where the router bit extends out from the router) with a hammer might help release the nut. If you try striking the collet, the hammer blows, of course, should not be so strong as to bend the router shaft.

If there is not enough space to grasp the router shaft with a wrench or Vice Grips, maybe taking the router apart could reveal some additional shaft and if lucky perhaps even a flat spot.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#4 posted 08-02-2016 11:29 AM

Like I said, that pin spanner wrench can hold the shaft. I think getting the shaft secured is the biggest problem, once it’s blocked from moving I’ll bet you can remove the nut. The only other thing I can suggest is to visit a machine shop and see if they can get it off. Failing either of those, as jbrow said you may have to consider replacing it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1570 days


#5 posted 08-02-2016 12:57 PM



Like I said, that pin spanner wrench can hold the shaft. I think getting the shaft secured is the biggest problem, once it s blocked from moving I ll bet you can remove the nut. The only other thing I can suggest is to visit a machine shop and see if they can get it off. Failing either of those, as jbrow said you may have to consider replacing it.

- Fred Hargis

My bad – I didn’t realize the purpose of that wrench initially!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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