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Help with myrtlewood that isn't flat....

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 08-01-2016 05:15 PM 256 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

485 posts in 310 days


08-01-2016 05:15 PM

Bought a couple of 4 foot long pieces of myrtlewood while on vacation

The color and grain drew me in even though I knew I would have to deal with the bend in the boards (one is pretty straight but the other is not).

I thought I had read to place the board in the sun with cup side down? Is this correct? Is moisture part of the process? Any suggestions are appreciated!


4 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3174 days


#1 posted 08-02-2016 06:45 PM

What will you be using the boards for? You may not need to do anything to get the lengths you need. Straightening the whole board just for the sake of straightening it may not be the most effective way to work with this board. If you spend the time to straighten it just for it to sit in your inventory it may warp again before you use it.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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ScottM

346 posts in 1608 days


#2 posted 08-02-2016 07:10 PM


What will you be using the boards for? You may not need to do anything to get the lengths you need. Straightening the whole board just for the sake of straightening it may not be the most effective way to work with this board. If you spend the time to straighten it just for it to sit in your inventory it may warp again before you use it.

- Mark Shymanski

Ditto. Depends what you’re going to do with it. Flattening shorter pieces, if they need to be once cut, will be much easier than trying to flatten the whole board only to cut a short from it.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2279 days


#3 posted 08-02-2016 07:31 PM

Putting a board in the sun can (but won’t always) work for cupping along the width, but I don’t think it will work for this kind of warping along its length (because wood doesn’t expand and contract measurably along its length). Jointing and planing it straight (but as Mark and Scott says, after cutting it close to the finished length you need in order to avoid losing more thickness than you have to) is the best way to go about it. 2 other possibilities are to resaw the board and glue it back together link a bent lamination, but you’ll likely lose more thickness than just jointing it. Or steam-straighten it.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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BB1

485 posts in 310 days


#4 posted 08-02-2016 10:21 PM

Sounds like I need to make smart cuts to deal with the warping along the length. There is also a bit of cupping. I had placed it out in the sun but didn’t see any changes. Would this be better to try again once I have the length cut down?

Of course, this all goes back to the original question Mark asked – what will I use this for. My plans for the boards are not yet “confirmed.” Yes – I bought them because I liked them and knew I would find a “perfect use.” I expect to use the wood for smaller projects (e.g., boxes, picture frame, clock) so I may be able to cut smart and achieve better flat sections. I do have a planer but no jointer (but should be able to handle using a taper jig for my table saw). Based on what I have read, I should plane pieces no shorter than 12 inches in length for safety reasons?

Thank you for the responses – appreciate each very much.

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