LumberJocks

Antique Mahogany Finish

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Chase posted 05-20-2010 12:48 AM 3297 views 2 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Chase's profile

Chase

448 posts in 1780 days


05-20-2010 12:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question mahogany finishing

I have always had a thing for antiques that involved mahogany and brass. Now that I am into woodworking I can make my own! I have a bit of nice clean mahogany, and have a few small projects I want to get started with. My question is this, how do i get an older style antique mahogany look like this:

or this

That kind of deep dark red/brown look. Any advice would be appreciated.

-Chase

-- Every neighborhood has an eccentric neighbor. I wondered for years "who was ours?" Then I realized it was me.


12 replies so far

View thatwoodworkingguy's profile

thatwoodworkingguy

375 posts in 1683 days


#1 posted 05-20-2010 01:48 AM

I believe mark spagnuolo aka the woodwhisperer has a tutorial on this for free on his website. Might want to check that.
However I believe that color tone is achieved using a series of dyes

-- thatwoodworkingguy.com ~Eagle America~ ~Woodcraft~

View Chase's profile

Chase

448 posts in 1780 days


#2 posted 05-20-2010 01:55 AM

Sure enough: http://thewoodwhisperer.com/antique-mahogany-finish/

I searched google and LJ, but wasn’t quite coming up with what I wanted, thanks for the suggestion.

-- Every neighborhood has an eccentric neighbor. I wondered for years "who was ours?" Then I realized it was me.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2109 posts in 2286 days


#3 posted 05-20-2010 02:34 AM

Try this finish for a small project, I would not try this on a large one. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/28367

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View Karson's profile

Karson

34916 posts in 3154 days


#4 posted 05-20-2010 02:36 AM

Good luck on your searching.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112939 posts in 2331 days


#5 posted 05-20-2010 03:06 AM

shoot Charles Neil a PM he will help you.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2049 days


#6 posted 05-20-2010 03:19 AM

I’ve read that potassium dichromate can be used to darken mahogany.
I have never tried it, yet, but I am expecting some to arrive soon.
I ordered it a few weeks ago from here
And here is an article on how to use it, or order from them.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View miserybob's profile

miserybob

88 posts in 1798 days


#7 posted 05-20-2010 04:19 AM

A note of, um, caution regarding Potassium Dichromate… from the msds… just sayin’:

3. Hazards Identification
Emergency Overview
—————————————
POISON! DANGER! MAY BE FATAL IF SWALLOWED, INHALED OR ABSORBED THROUGH SKIN. STRONG OXIDIZER. CONTACT WITH OTHER MATERIAL MAY CAUSE A FIRE. CORROSIVE. CAUSES SEVERE BURNS TO EVERY AREA OF CONTACT. AFFECTS THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM, LIVER, KIDNEYS, EYES, SKIN AND BLOOD. MAY CAUSE ALLERGIC REACTION. CANCER HAZARD. CAN CAUSE CANCER. Risk of cancer depends on duration and level of exposure.

SAF-T-DATA Ratings (Provided here for your convenience)
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————-
Health Rating: 4 – Extreme (Cancer Causing)
Flammability Rating: 0 – None
Reactivity Rating: 3 – Severe (Oxidizer)
Contact Rating: 4 – Extreme (Life)
Lab Protective Equip: GOGGLES & SHIELD; LAB COAT & APRON; VENT HOOD; PROPER GLOVES
Storage Color Code: Yellow (Reactive)
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Potential Health Effects
—————————————————

Inhalation:
Corrosive. Extremely destructive to tissues of the mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract. May cause ulceration and perforation of the nasal septum. Symptoms may include sore throat, coughing, shortness of breath, and labored breathing. May produce pulmonary sensitization or allergic asthma. Higher exposures may cause pulmonary edema.
Ingestion:
Corrosive. Swallowing can cause severe burns of the mouth, throat, and stomach, leading to death. Can cause sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea. May cause violent gastroenteritis, peripheral vascular collapse, dizziness, intense thirst, muscle cramps, shock, coma, abnormal bleeding, fever, liver damage and acute renal failure.
Skin Contact:
Corrosive. Symptoms of redness, pain, and severe burn can occur. Dusts and strong solutions may cause severe irritation. Contact with broken skin may cause ulcers (chrome sores) and absorption, which may cause systemic poisoning, affecting kidney and liver functions. May cause skin sensitization. Highly Toxic! May be absorbed through the skin; symptoms may parallel ingestion.
Eye Contact:
Corrosive. Contact can cause blurred vision, redness, pain and severe tissue burns. May cause corneal injury or blindness.
Chronic Exposure:
Repeated or prolonged exposure can cause ulceration and perforation of the nasal septum, respiratory irritation, liver and kidney damage and ulceration of the skin. Ulcerations at first may be painless, but may penetrate to the bone producing “chrome holes.” Known to be a human carcinogen.
Aggravation of Pre-existing Conditions:
Persons with pre-existing skin disorders, asthma, allergies or known sensitization to chromic acid or chromates may be more susceptible to the effects of this material.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1172 posts in 2624 days


#8 posted 05-21-2010 12:35 AM

I totally agree , leave the chemical stuff alone, dyes and stains are safer and the result is far more assured,

can you give me a close up of the color you want.. we can do this alot safer and better… no Pm needed , glad to share

Just did an Article for Woodcraft magazine , on a mahogany table that is over 200 years old,examined it at a museum , matched it , not an issue, will be glad to help.. are you using Honduran or, African , or Santa Domingo mahogany

View Chase's profile

Chase

448 posts in 1780 days


#9 posted 05-21-2010 01:49 AM

Not sure on the source of mahogany, but I am getting the idea that there is just some dye work involved. That is mostly what I was looking for, a direction to go in for that older style antique look. I havent broken into dyes yet, but now is as good a time as any. Luckily I made sure to have lots of extra wood, so I will do some discovery and playing around with dyes and maybe a bit of pore filling. Thanks for the help charles and everyone.

-- Every neighborhood has an eccentric neighbor. I wondered for years "who was ours?" Then I realized it was me.

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1195 posts in 2312 days


#10 posted 05-21-2010 02:14 AM

I am currently working on a mahogany picture frame, and using Darrell Peart’s suggestion in his book to use aniline dye to antique it, then put the clear coat on. I did four test pieces, using TransTint’s Golden Brown, Dark Mission Brown, Reddish Brown, and Red Mahogany. I liked the Reddish Brown the most because it made it look older, but not muddy. He suggests Arm-R-Seal as a top coat, which is my new favorite anyway. Unfortunately, none of the finishes in my samples come anywhere near your almost black photos. I would think that would take a walnut style finish to achieve, which would also require pore fillers. Basically, I just went on www.NewYankee.com and did a search on “mahogany”. Tons of projects show up, and you can pick the finish you like from there.

I think Norm did a variety of deep, rich mahogany finishes on projects like:

http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct.php?0504

http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct.php?0711

http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct.php?0702

http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct.php?0209

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View jevarn71's profile

jevarn71

80 posts in 1914 days


#11 posted 05-24-2010 11:53 AM

You can always try putting it out in the sun before applying the finish. That will darken mahogany quite a bit. Mahogany will darken on its own over time, even after the finish is applied.

-- Jason - Aim High!!

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2881 days


#12 posted 05-24-2010 03:31 PM

I’m a big fan of reaction dyes like Potassium Bichromate, lye, iron acetate and ammonia fuming.
However, if I need to match or restore colors, then I’ll use dyes, stains and toners.

I’ve used TransTint liquid concentrates and dry aniline dye powders from Lee Valley. Both get me there.

-- 温故知新

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase