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Is restoration possible? Is it worth it?

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Forum topic by mike02130 posted 08-01-2016 01:45 PM 825 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mike02130

95 posts in 132 days


08-01-2016 01:45 PM

I just picked up an old leather belt driven lathe. It is missing the motor and pulley. It is made to be used with flat belts. The countershaft(?) is missing. I found a very brief description and pictures on Vintage machinery’s web site. Can this be done or reworked to run? What parts would I need? http://www.vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=14291

The pictures are not of my lathe, it is the same as mine but mine is disassembled.

Thanks,
Mike

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.


10 replies so far

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 162 days


#1 posted 08-01-2016 01:53 PM

Not an expert on lathes, but that stuff had very simple designs, an electric motor from anything can be made to fit, belts no problem. There will be guys on here shortly tell you all about it. Looks like a really nice find ive been looking for something like that myself.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

347 posts in 1876 days


#2 posted 08-01-2016 02:14 PM

if it has been made it can be made – so the answers yes, it can be restored.
babbit bearings can be recast and scraped to fit
worn shafts can be built up and ground down to dimension
bushes can be turned
ball/roler bearings can have cups turned to fit a loose housing and bushes to fit a loose shaft

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#3 posted 08-01-2016 10:30 PM

An old lathe like yours is an antique and worthy of restoration. From the picture, it appears that most of what you need is there and looks to be in pretty good shape. It looks heavy which is a good thing in a lathe. You can contact John Knox at 847-384-1146. He custom makes belts for any machine. He is a great person to talk to and his prices are very reasonable. Looks like you will need to mount the jack shaft above the lathe to suit whatever length belt you wish to use. A vee belt pulley at one end of the jack shaft can be fitted to be driven by an electric motor; 3/4 horse would be a good choice.

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#4 posted 08-01-2016 10:36 PM

What parts would I need?

A motor, pulley, v-belt (motor to countershaft pulley) and serpentine belt (coutershaft pulley to lathe). If you don’t have the countershaft, one can be made from wood if needed. The serpentine belt is used ‘inside out’ in place of a leather belt – something frequently done on old metal lathes like my South Bend.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#5 posted 08-03-2016 07:20 AM

Before restoring it, ask yourself if you really want to. Restoring old lathes is more a labor of love because very often they are not friendly to the modern turner. They can have oddball threads, oddball tapers, or no threads or no tapers. Yours apparently dates to the 1880’s which means plain bearings that will limit you to low speed turning. I wouldn’t be surprised if the tapers are something other than Morse. Restore it because you love old machines and consider yourself a caretaker that will eventually pass it on. It’s a museum piece not a daily driver. If you are looking for a cheap way to get into woodturning, post it for sale on OWWM and buy something made after about 1950.

http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/p/how-to-buy-vintage-lathe.html

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

643 posts in 2273 days


#6 posted 08-03-2016 10:17 AM

I say restore it. I agree, it may not be as effective as the modern machinery, but it will look sharp in the shop.
After all, isn’t part of the wood working hobby simply an excuse to collect tools? And this could be a show piece.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View mike02130's profile

mike02130

95 posts in 132 days


#7 posted 08-08-2016 12:37 AM

Thanks guys for all your recommendations and advice. Now that I lugged it out of my driveway and put it together, I realize it’s not the same lathe as in the above pictures.

It seems all there except the motor and belts. I’ll figure something out as far as a counter shaft goes. What about a pulley from the countershaft to the lathe? I guess I just need to keep my out. The tailstock center is tapered. It is smaller than a #2 Morse taper. I’m missing the center for the headstock. The spindle measures 1 1/16 with 10 TPI.

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#8 posted 08-09-2016 05:36 AM



The tailstock center is tapered. It is smaller than a #2 Morse taper. I m missing the center for the headstock.

The spindle measures 1 1/16 with 10 TPI.

- mike02130

Oh that sucks. Not to doubt you but you sure it isn’t a 1×10?

I read a good tip once, to determine an unknown female machine taper, make a casting of the inside and then measure it. The tailstock taper must be tiny, could be 0MT, if it is Morse.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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mike02130

95 posts in 132 days


#9 posted 08-11-2016 12:47 PM

Yes, you’re right, It is a 1” spindle with 10 TPI. Here is a picture of the taper next to a Morse #2. Does any one have a line on where to get a motor pulley for this thing?

Thanks,

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2343 posts in 2457 days


#10 posted 08-11-2016 02:58 PM

Old tools are always worth restoring. Keep them from going to scrap.
Try looking for that motor pulley from the “AMISH”. They have resources for this !
If not they will make one for you.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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