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Any idea what species of wood this is?

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Forum topic by Keen1 posted 05-19-2010 06:55 AM 1101 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Keen1

103 posts in 3307 days


05-19-2010 06:55 AM

I’m sure the experts here will know quickly. These boards came from either a shop or schoolhouse around Selma, AL and reportedly 60+ years old. A buddy of mine had them laying around his hunting camp and wanted me to route out some trail signs for him to put around the camp. I was able to simply clean up the first board in the middle so the wood shows about how I found it. The other two I planed off. The one on the left I stained with a dark brown stain I think it looks terrible. I have no idea what the original finish was but it looks much better. The board on the right is freshly planed to give you an idea of the true color. I’ve also included a shot of that board a little closer to give better detail of the grain. ANY IDEA WHAT TYPE OF WOOD THIS IS? I’ve had people guess hickory, alder and walnut. I think maybe pecan but I honestly have no idea. I hope someone here does.
Thanks for any insight

-- Dad to 5, Son of The One


15 replies so far

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2533 days


#1 posted 05-19-2010 08:04 AM

Definately not Hickory or Alder and I’m pretty sire it’s not a Walnut with that orange color. I think Pecan is just a variety of Hickory so I’m pretty sure it’s not that either. The grain of the piece on the right looks a lot like Goncalo Alves (aka Tiger Wood). Can you describe it a little beyond the pictures? How hard and heavy is it? Does it have a bright orange color when freshly cut that browns a bit after being exposed to light and air for a while?

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3284 days


#2 posted 05-19-2010 01:50 PM

Looks a lot like Tulip to me…

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

555 posts in 2742 days


#3 posted 05-19-2010 02:06 PM

Red gum?

View addlepated's profile

addlepated

6 posts in 2404 days


#4 posted 05-19-2010 02:09 PM

juniper?

-- hg Original

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2535 days


#5 posted 05-19-2010 02:43 PM

I’m not certain. I don’t think anyone is. However, my first guess would be pecan.

Someone else mentioned Goncalo Alves. The key question there is how heavy is it. Goncalo Alves is very heavy.

Someone else mentioned Tulip. There is a South American tulip wood (a.k.a. Pau Rosa) and it is definitely not that. The North American tulip wood is actually a variation of poplar and it is quite light. It might be that, but I doubt it.

Weight (and aroma) are often good clues. You could compare it to woods you already know and say it’s about the same weight of pine or oak or whatever.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 3366 days


#6 posted 05-19-2010 02:51 PM

An endgrain shot would help some. My guess would be sweetgum heartwood, or red gum as it’s sometimes called like lwllms said.

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1310 posts in 2447 days


#7 posted 05-19-2010 03:24 PM

It kind of looks like some old pecan that I had for a while.

Whatever it is, it is exceptionally pretty.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2941 days


#8 posted 05-19-2010 03:29 PM

I agree with Lis, it looks like pecan to me too.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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Keen1

103 posts in 3307 days


#9 posted 05-19-2010 03:39 PM

As far as weight and texture, I would say this is more comparable to walnut than any other wood I am familiar with. Maybe a little bit lighter than walnut, but not much. I haven’t worked with Goncalo Alves to know how to compare it. If Goncalo Alves is as heavy/dense as ipe then it is definitely not Goncalo Alves.

Oh and orange in the wood was a surprise. As I mentioned, it was old and gray like old barn wood. Chips from the planer are orange too. It did look a little more brown this morning but it could just be lighting campared to when I took the pictures last night. How long do you consider a “while” for a fresh cut to change colors?

I’ll try to get an end grain shot tonight.

Thanks

-- Dad to 5, Son of The One

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Keen1

103 posts in 3307 days


#10 posted 05-19-2010 04:35 PM

.

-- Dad to 5, Son of The One

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2535 days


#11 posted 05-19-2010 04:52 PM

Goncala Alves is very close to being as heavy and dense as ipe. It is definitely heavier than any domestic wood I am familiar with.

I don’t think it would float, but I have not tested that.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#12 posted 05-19-2010 05:11 PM

The best match I can find is tulipwood. Here is a sample I found on the internet:

Looks pretty close to me.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#13 posted 05-19-2010 05:33 PM

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 3366 days


#14 posted 05-19-2010 06:09 PM

View Keen1's profile

Keen1

103 posts in 3307 days


#15 posted 05-19-2010 07:04 PM

I’m leaning toward redgum after seeing the pics from the links above. While I admit the pics of the tulipwood are very similar, I am pretty sure that it’s not tulipwood. It’s not nearly as red as (or white) as any tulipwood I’ve ever worked with. Order if my guesses is #1 redgum, #2 pecan, #3 tulipwood (only because the picture CharlieM posted).

Also got better information on it’s origin came from the kitchen of a wealthy family that also happened to own the local sawmill. So I guess it could have from anywhere for a person with the means. (I was thinking it was most likely regional for utility use in a school or store)

-- Dad to 5, Son of The One

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