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Forum topic by jwmalone posted 07-29-2016 07:51 PM 595 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


07-29-2016 07:51 PM

A guy just brought this unassembled chair to me. His father found it in 1952 in an old barn. He was going to finish the chair but never got to it. The owner was a furniture maker who had passed away in 1937. This chair was in the barn unfinished, you can still see most of the layout marks, knife not pencil. So if the chair was being made by an old furniture maker in the late 30s who was said to have been 70 something he must of learned his trade in the late 19th century. To me this is just the coolest thing ive seen in a long time. A window to the past kinda. He wants me to finish it. Termites got to it in a few spots the guy broke 1 slat and a dowel taking it apart, He put it in a plastic tote box with a bug bomb to kill the termite and such. It will be for decorative purpose. Its one of those wide low sitting chairs ive seen them before cant remember the style or name. The wood seems to be in good shape considering. Anyone know any thing off the wall about working old wood I should know about. The top slat which is broken was held in place with a small dowel ive always seen small nail in there never a dowel. Posted this cause I thought someone else might think its cool.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa


15 replies so far

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Bill White

4457 posts in 3427 days


#1 posted 07-29-2016 08:30 PM

Absolutely pure junk. I’ll take it off your hands for a small fee (SURE)!
Get after the resto. It will be a treasure in your home.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#2 posted 07-29-2016 08:55 PM

Very cool, please update once you’ve restored. NO real advice to offer, but if it was bombed I’d certainly suggest a respirator for sanding… Oh and nice work mate TOO!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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splatman

563 posts in 865 days


#3 posted 07-29-2016 09:01 PM

Perfect opportunity to make a reproduction, especially if the original is too bug-eaten to be fit for its purpose. It’s easier to copy something when it’s apart, because you can also exactly copy the mortises and such.

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ki7hy

503 posts in 206 days


#4 posted 07-29-2016 09:09 PM

Definitely a mask for sanding and Splatman has an awesome point, catalog that thing and make more exactly like the old man did it. Definitely something special there. Lucky you for that to land in your hands, good on you.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#5 posted 07-29-2016 09:23 PM

Yes, I most certainly will take all measurements and photograph everything, it may be awhile before I get to it few weeks or so, Once I get the lay out ill send it to any one who wants it, but that style was pretty common around here. You could get them anywhere most likely.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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Aj2

692 posts in 1264 days


#6 posted 07-29-2016 09:32 PM

That’s very cool thanks for sharing it with us.

Aj

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

700 posts in 854 days


#7 posted 07-29-2016 09:38 PM

Looks like a fun and probably challenging project.

BTW, the holes I can see in your pictures look like they were made by some sort of wood boring beetles not termites. They probably left long ago. They might even be why the guy never finish the chair.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#8 posted 07-29-2016 10:54 PM

I believe your right lazyman, it will get painted black so I can hide all that, personally id stain it some how but its not my call.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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JoeinGa

7484 posts in 1473 days


#9 posted 07-30-2016 12:43 AM



That s very cool thanks for sharing it with us.

Aj

- Aj2

What he said ! ^

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2710 days


#10 posted 08-07-2016 09:33 PM

Maybe you could contact Roy Underhill of the Woodwright’s Shop.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#11 posted 08-08-2016 02:05 AM

I’ve said it before Roy Underhill is my favorite super hero.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#12 posted 08-08-2016 10:34 AM

Can you tell if it was assembled without glue, using only differential shrinkage (dryer rungs than posts) to hold it together? I’d use hide glue to assemble it at this point.
What species is the wood?

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#13 posted 08-08-2016 02:06 PM

Jeremy beat me to it but I will add a +1 to what he said.
You’ve just got to assemble this with hot hide glue.

If you aren’t familiar with HHG here’s a primer….. everything you need to know about hide glue.
http://lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/series/5437

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#14 posted 08-08-2016 03:29 PM

The wood is oak, and yes to the differential shrinkage its obvious if you could see it in person (those guys were geniuses). This is my idea, the bottom will be cane of course, cane was also used sometimes on the joints (rung meets post) it was decorative as well as adding strength. You don’t see it much on this style but I have seen it before on one and it looked very nice and is super strong. That way I can stay with a technique and material that would fit the time frame. But the way there designed, once the seat is woven on it cant come apart, even if the joints are lose. The front and back legs are fitted with rungs first, then the holes for the side rungs are drilled out and it over laps the front and back rungs creating a small saddle joint were the dowels meet in the post. So when all four sides are together you can not pull the front or back legs apart their locked in. the bottom rung on the back along with the cane on the seatwill not allow the top of the back legs to open far enough for the top slat to come out. That is usualy were I find two small nails the only nails in the chair, this guy used a small dowel. No glue no nails just dry and green lumber fitted and held together by thin strips of sap wood striped off a hardwood in 20 foot lengths. Genius I tell you.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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mocchuan

2 posts in 123 days


#15 posted 08-08-2016 04:02 PM


That s very cool thanks for sharing it with us.

Aj

- Aj2

What he said ! ^

- JoeinGa


^ ^ haha

-- Mr Tuan, http://mocchuan.vn

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