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What 1/4" shank router bits you use the most?

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Forum topic by distrbd posted 07-29-2016 04:02 PM 423 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


07-29-2016 04:02 PM

I just got myself a Dewalt P611PK, have a couple of routers with 1/4” collet (Ryobi, Trend-T4) but this is the lightest one of them all for hand held routing. I have a couple of bigger routers for more serious routing.

I do most of my routing with my router table , always avoid using hand held unless it’s the easier way like trimming, chamfering, but a light weight router may change things.

I was wondering what 1/4” shank bits do you use the most with your hand held router? at what point do you decide to go with a router table and 1/2” shank version of Ogee,V groove, chamfer, bullnose, etc.?

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada


14 replies so far

View DalyArcher's profile

DalyArcher

72 posts in 587 days


#1 posted 07-29-2016 04:14 PM

laminate trimming, small round over bits and small chamfers. I just got my first 1/2 inch router last year (Bosch Mrc23) before that all I really had was my Colt trim router. I did manage to cut a few mortises with that, but would not recommend it. My new philosophy is if I can get the bit in 1/2 inch, then I will. Save the 1/4 inch for light duty edge treatment and maybe mortising small door hinges for cabinets and such.

View JayT's profile

JayT

4788 posts in 1679 days


#2 posted 07-29-2016 04:18 PM

Edge trimming and basic profile bits, especially roundovers, and some straight bits.

I’m going to use the trim router when the piece is too big to easily take to the table so want to take the router to the workpiece. As you mention, that’s the big advantage of the trim router—light weight. On big pieces, I’m most likely to be doing the edges and the trim router does a great job.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#3 posted 07-29-2016 04:38 PM

I forgot the roundovers,use that often handheld , manufacturers make 1/4” skank bits for just about every profile but in my experience some of the longer/bigger bits should only be used with 1/2” shank.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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bosum3919

338 posts in 1087 days


#4 posted 07-29-2016 05:10 PM

Maybe I am not fully understanding the question. Do you mean what type or what brandu. If you mean brand, then I only use Whiteside when I have the choice. If you mean type, then my rule of thumb is always router table first, then the largest handheld the project will safely allow. 1/2 inch shank first and then 1/4 inch when required. For me, there is usually not a hard and unbreakable rule, but I have to feel comfortable and safe. Routers bite. Don’t ask how I know. The Dewalt P611PK is in my inventory. Great tool. Experience is the only thing that will truly answer your question about type. Everyone is at a different level of experience.

-- Bob

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4459 posts in 3428 days


#5 posted 07-29-2016 05:19 PM

I use those 1/4” puppies in my OLD Makita for light duty work. It was my first router, and still works well after over 20 yrs.
GO BLUE!
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#6 posted 07-29-2016 05:53 PM

To make the question more clear, I just wanted to know (for handheld use only)what bits would you use the most with a small 1 HP router,there are so many profiles,Ogee, Bullnose,V Groove,so on, although the small lightweight routers are capable of holding a 1/4” shank Ogee bit ,but I still would rather use a 1/2” shank and a bigger router.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#7 posted 07-29-2016 06:03 PM


my rule of thumb is always router table first, then the largest handheld the project will safely allow. 1/2 inch shank first and then 1/4 inch when required.

- bosum3919


That’s exactly how I do it, and it looks like so do many others .

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#8 posted 07-29-2016 07:46 PM

straight trim and 1/8” roundover

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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OSU55

1063 posts in 1457 days


#9 posted 07-29-2016 08:00 PM

For 1/4” shaft light handheld, not over ~ 1” dia bit. Depth of cut has as much to do with it as bit size. Make multiple cuts and add in cut depth/edge guide setting depending on bit shape, leaving yourself a light finish cut to address tear out and burning.

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clin

514 posts in 464 days


#10 posted 07-29-2016 08:13 PM



straight trim and 1/8” roundover

- Rick M.

I’d add a pattern bit to this list. I have the same DeWalt router (love it) and use the straight trim, straight pattern, and 1/8” roundover a lot. It is actually quite a useful router. It’s plunge base works well.

I’d actually recommend this router to anyone as a first, general purpose router. It’s really a bit bigger than a trim router, yet much smaller than a full size and therefore easier to handle.

-- Clin

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CampD

1475 posts in 2954 days


#11 posted 07-29-2016 08:18 PM

1/8 roundover

-- Doug...

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5734 posts in 2836 days


#12 posted 07-30-2016 12:32 AM

I don’t know how many 1/4” × 1/4” shank bits I have used in 40+ years of woodworking.

The first router, Craftsman, only accepted 1/4” shank bits.
When I got my first Porter Cable router I could have started using 1/2” shank bits but I only had 1/4” bits which has now grown to 1/2” shank bits too.

My Bosch Colt is also on 1/4” shank bits.
Router table first, handheld when the table won’t work.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#13 posted 07-30-2016 01:11 AM

Old novice, I think most of us will end up with two of the same profile, one 1/4” shank and one with 1/2” shank,of course not the big/heavy bits like raised panel or the like,but two trim bits, or spiral bits, ogee,v groove , etc,etc. we eventually might end up having a 1/4 ” and 1/2”(shank)of the exact same bits.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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oldnovice

5734 posts in 2836 days


#14 posted 07-30-2016 04:16 AM

I tend to use a router as a “finishing” tool after cutting an edge with a circular saw or saber saw that’s why I used so many.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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