LumberJocks

Dust collection accessories?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Zac80 posted 07-29-2016 07:58 AM 362 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Zac80's profile

Zac80

17 posts in 201 days


07-29-2016 07:58 AM

Hello everyone,
I recently purchased a used Jet DC1100,I am curious if anyone can tell the most efficient way to go about using it with the current tools i have. An old Craftsman 10” RAS and a Craftsman 10” belt driven table saw. Neither have dedicated dust ports just an open base. Any ideas would be appreciated, pics would be good if you have them. I also have a dust vac, is that sufficient to use for my smaller hand power tools (sanders, router etc.) or do i need to buy the necessary fittings to go with the 4” line on the DC. Thank you


4 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile (online now)

Redoak49

1946 posts in 1451 days


#1 posted 07-29-2016 11:00 AM

The RAS is tough and take a look at what people have done on miter saws. Many RAS have a port on the blade guard. Also put up a barrier behind the saw.

For the table saw, block off as much of the area around the belt. You could make a wood piece for the bottom with a dust port. Or they make a bag to go under the saw.

There are many thread about that type table saw.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#2 posted 07-29-2016 03:11 PM

Zac80,

It seems to me that adding reducers to the 4” dust collector pipe so that dust from small hand held tools can be collected would restrict air flow to the dust collector too much to be effective and could increase stress on the dust collector motor. I use a shop vac to draw dust from hand held tools. A few years ago I upgraded the shop vac by adding Oneida’s Dust Deputy cyclone. I did so because I tried of cleaning the shop vac filter so often. The upgrade does an amazing job of keeping the filter cleaner longer.

Since my table saw is a cabinet saw, I have not struggled with below the table dust collection. However there are a number of YouTube videos that may help you decide how to approach this problem. Even though I have below the table dust collection, I continue to get dust thrown out on the table, especially when making skim cuts. One approach to above the table dust collection is an overhead arm with a dust shroud around the blade. There are several above the table dust collecting products commercially available. I seem to recall a YouTube video where a creative wood worker built his own overhead table saw dust collection shroud.

I have a Craftsman Radial Arm saw and built a dust collecting contraption. There are number of YouTube video showing various designs for the radial arm saw but I went with my own. The designs in most YouTube videos place the dust collecting shroud right up to the back side of the fence and seem to be impressively effective. Since I frequent use a clamp-on stop for repetitive cuts, I wanted space behind the fence, so I designed and built my own. Although mine is a straight forward design and build, my inability to adequate describe the construction may leave you scratching your head. I did the best I could.

I built a hollow L shaped assembly that sets on the blade side of the radial arm saw behind the fence. I then lined the interior of the assembly with 4” HVAC snap lock pipe but did not snap the pipe into is normal round form. Rather I screwed one edge on the inside of the assembly and allowed the opposite edge to protrude from the assembly and act as a ramp to direct dust into the slot along the lower part of the L assembly. Since I collect dust from above, the tower portion of the L assembly was also lined with HVAC pipe. HVAC pipe was installed to improve air flow and reduce turbulence by eliminating 90 degree corners. A dust collector take-off was added at the top of the L assembly. The dust intake slot in the L assembly was sized for optimum performance by ensuring its cross sectional area equaled the cross sectional area of the dust collector piping.

I added some baffles on top of the assembly to better direct air flow. I also added hinged side walls made from tempered hardboard, one attached to the L assembly and the other on the side opposite the blade attached to a piece of plywood attached on the back side of the saw. The hinges side walls typically remain against the back side of the fence, but can be swung out of the way for my clamp-on stop. I plugged the dust port on the blade guard since little dust is ejected here.

Blade Side L Assembly…

Swinging Baffle Non-Blade Side…

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1410 days


#3 posted 07-29-2016 09:43 PM

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

645 posts in 2275 days


#4 posted 07-29-2016 10:50 PM

I have a 10” craftsman RAS. I have “Big Gulp” dust hood mounted right behind the blade, wedged between the pillar and the table top. Works great.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com