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Forum topic by McFly posted 07-27-2016 04:25 PM 369 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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McFly

188 posts in 494 days


07-27-2016 04:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cherry maple mahogany finishing question

I’m making a sliding shelving cabinet for a bathroom and the client selected mahogany shelves and cherry with maple accents for the side.

I want to stain this so that the cherry & mahogany both even put to roughly the same color, but I’m learning there are often issues with blotchy finishes on cherry.

Seems there are 2 schools of thought on the topic, one being that the blotches are simply the character of the grain and are awesome and the other being that a sealer is needed to produce a homogenous finished product.

What say the LJ’s on all this?


9 replies so far

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#1 posted 07-27-2016 04:44 PM

Well if you want homogeneous, you will need a sealer. all that does is alow the areas that are going to soak up lots of stain to fill up so to speak. then a lite sanding to open it back up and the stain will go on a little more even. (sometimes). If you realy want it even I mix a little stain in my clear finish. That’s been around for ever. pollyshades is not a new idea or a good product stay away from that crap. In my experience with home owners blotchy is not good, that blotchy character is lovely to the diy guy that didn’t know a better way. But not so lovely to a paying customer. You can apply more coats to certain areas to darken them up then use straight clear for the finish coat. Just don’t mix it to heavy.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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Julian

1038 posts in 2157 days


#2 posted 07-27-2016 04:51 PM

I apply sealer to cherry before staining. I do not like blotchy finishes on any wood.

-- Julian

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#3 posted 07-27-2016 06:08 PM

Blotch = ugly. Use blotch control to avoid.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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McFly

188 posts in 494 days


#4 posted 07-27-2016 08:15 PM

Sounds pretty unanimous to me. Sealer it is!

I think I have some minwax sander/sealer from when we did our floors. I wonder how that would work out.

On to my next question:
I had planned on using an oil to finish, but I also have some paste wax leftover that I may want to try.

When it concerns the woods used here; cherry, maple & genuine mahogany, is one of those options “better”? If so, why?

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#5 posted 07-27-2016 08:49 PM

sand n seal works, hell its all cut down polly or varnish or such. I like paste wax but check with the home owner that can be a high maintenance finish according to some people. AS far as better id say it was personal preference. I’m not much help sitting on the fence about everthing, but its what the customer wants if their happy good deal. Edit bathroom I wouldn’t use the paste wax

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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Kirk650

294 posts in 215 days


#6 posted 07-27-2016 09:52 PM

I used to worry about blotching of Cherry. Then on one short vacation trip with the wife, we dropped in on a family friend. I knew he was a woodworker, but I didn’t really know what that meant. Turns out he’s a pro and sells little tables for $6,000 each. He had a 4 poster bed made from Koa that was breathtaking, and for sale at $30,000. Ok…so I’m a woodworker too, but on a different level. He had some of his small tables on hand, in several woods and combinations of different woods, and one was in Cherry. Lovely table. I asked him what he did about blotchy cherry and he looked at me like I was from outer space and said he did nothing different. He did sand to a much higher grit than I did. So, I went home to make my project in Cherry. Sanded to 600, stained with Transtint, and finished in Waterlox, and it came out looking great. Yes, you do get lighter and darker areas of wood, but the final result is more predictable and attractive than using a blotch controller. But, that’s just my opinion.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#7 posted 07-27-2016 10:22 PM

Transtint products are all dyes or something akin to it if I’m not mistaken. Totally different than stain, that’s like making poor mans cherry. Poplar dyed to look like cherry

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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Kirk650

294 posts in 215 days


#8 posted 07-28-2016 12:45 AM

Actually, it wasn’t Transtint I used but JE Moser’s Dark Wine Cherry Stain. Looks great, giving the look of old cherry without having to wait a couple of years or decades for it to darken. I got the idea from an article in Fine Woodworking that showed a great finish for cherry. I’ve used that approach for a few years now.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#9 posted 07-28-2016 01:13 AM

Don’t do much cherry but ill look that up for future reference.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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