LumberJocks

Tried a new (to me at least) idea for eliminating planer snipe

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by sras posted 1535 days ago 2672 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View sras's profile

sras

3782 posts in 1732 days


1535 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: tip trick planer sander

I am working on a project where I have no extra material. One thing I could not afford was any planer snipe. My pieces were only about 12” long and I was concerned about snipe ruining the piece. I usually can control snipe with longer pieces, but not always. I really did not want to have any risk with this part. Here is what I did:

I cut 2 pieces of scrap fir from a 2×4 to similar thickness (slightly thicker, not thinner)

I put one piece of fir as the lead-in piece, pushed my hardwood in right behind it and followed up with the second piece of fir pushing the hardwood.

The planer snipe showed up on the sacrificial pieces of fir and my hardwood was uniform thickness.

One thing I learned was to make wure the sacrifical pieces are long enough. I was tempted to use short pieces since they were scrap. Bad idea. Make sure the pieces are around 12” long.

This might work with thickness sanders as well.

Sorry for the lack of pictures, didn’t think of the camera until after I was done. If I do this again, I’ll update the post with pics.

Hope this is helpful – comments and criticisms are welcome.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive


24 replies so far

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

448 posts in 1608 days


#1 posted 1535 days ago

You could also make a sled with 2 pieces of scrap glued down on a piece of ply in front and in back of the piece. then run the whole thing through with the workpiece captured in between.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1777 days


#2 posted 1535 days ago

You’re exactly right.

Like sacrificial boards to reduce chipout, on a router table … sacrificial boards before and after can eliminate snipe on the work piece.

Nicely done ! Good thinking !

I pretty much used Michael Murphy’s idea … carpet-taping the three boards to an MDF sled … on my front hallway African Mahogany trim bits.

-- -- Neil

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2345 posts in 1564 days


#3 posted 1535 days ago

Let me make sure I understand this. Michael, a plywood base with two pieces glued to the sides to make a sled. The sides are shorter that the piece that is being planed, am I correct? Is the sled longer than the piece being planed? What about boards that are 2-3 ft. long? Same thing? I have a planer and a bunch of boards to plane for a table top. Wife asked me this weekend as to how old she will be when she gets the table in the kitchen. Thanks for the question and replies.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1777 days


#4 posted 1535 days ago

Knothead: The way I took it … and the way I DID it … was three boards, laid end to end, and touching.

This put the snipe FAR away from the beginning and end of the important board.

-- -- Neil

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5416 posts in 2031 days


#5 posted 1535 days ago

i sandwich the boards. Scrap on either side and a bit longer than the work piece.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

845 posts in 1897 days


#6 posted 1535 days ago

In the early days of my Rigid planer I tried to plane a large amount of 2×6 and 2×8 to make an outdoor circular patio table / bench. The result of not knowing anything or how to care for the tool resulted in a divot right in the middle of the metal plate below the knife set. Most likely from lifting the 8’ lengths of 2x at their end. Didn’t stop the outdoor project, but was guaranteed snipe for any boards after that since second roller couldn’t make contact before the knife was pushing down.

So, I cut a 4’ by 12” by 1/2” sheet of MDF as a permanent sled. Position of the MDF is from the exit apron of the planer. I start a piece through by pushing both it and the MDF. Usually the piece slides on the MDF after starting. Same MDF of a year now.

Never have any snipe now and it lets me plane to very thin thickness. I don’t plane anything longer than 30” so the sled is always under the piece of wood.

Steve.

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

344 posts in 1625 days


#7 posted 1535 days ago

you can also glue longer sacrificial runners on both sides of the expensive short piece. Plane them all together then rip the runners back off. Takes a lot of time but can be worth it on small pieces of exotic lumber.

-- Greg, Severn MD

View sras's profile

sras

3782 posts in 1732 days


#8 posted 1535 days ago

Thanks for the comments everyone. Gluing side pieces or mounting pieces to a common board are both significant improvements. Very helpful!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

448 posts in 1608 days


#9 posted 1535 days ago

Actually it could be scraps along side the work piece screwed to the sides of a ply piece to make a sled. That would work to avoid the snipe. Just make sure your sled is longer than the workpiece and you have a stop on the back of the sled to keep the work from sliding backwards.

Carpet tape is a bit flexible isn’t it? It compresses a bit when pushed sown on. That may result in some surface irregularities, but it may work, I have never used it.

Sorry, don’t have sketchup on this computer at home. Using primitive draw and scan method.
Sled drawings

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112001 posts in 2180 days


#10 posted 1535 days ago

Thats the way to go. less snipe the better/

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View sras's profile

sras

3782 posts in 1732 days


#11 posted 1535 days ago

Hey Michael – who needs Sketchup when you can draw that well? Very helpful!

The nice thing about the version in the first sketch is you can get by with shorter sacrifical pieces when they are glued to a sled.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

448 posts in 1608 days


#12 posted 1535 days ago

I am happy to be able to help.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2345 posts in 1564 days


#13 posted 1535 days ago

Thanks for the input, guys. I have some pecan that my wife wants made into a table. Good information here that makes me a bit more confident about doing a decent job.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4522 posts in 1677 days


#14 posted 1535 days ago

I’ve had pretty good luck by taping strips along the sides with double stick tape and not using a sled underneath.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View sras's profile

sras

3782 posts in 1732 days


#15 posted 1534 days ago

I think If I need to do this again I’ll try the side by side method. Not sure why – maybe it seems like it is as effective with less sacrifical material. Maybe I just like to experiment…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

showing 1 through 15 of 24 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase