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Forum topic by bigblockyeti posted 07-26-2016 12:22 AM 496 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


07-26-2016 12:22 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Found this for sale for $40 and the seller thinks it’s either oak or wormy chesnut and has no other pictures for now. It’s 74” x 21” x 1 1/4” and that puts it around $3/bdft but I don’t need any oak, however, I’d love a chunk of chesnut that size. What do you think?


11 replies so far

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recycle1943

1158 posts in 1088 days


#1 posted 07-26-2016 12:31 AM

If it were wormy chestnut you could see tracks/trails of the worms. You evidently can’t do a touchy feely on it ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#2 posted 07-26-2016 12:56 AM

I can, but it’s 45 – 50 minutes away so I’m doing what research I can before making a drive down.

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recycle1943

1158 posts in 1088 days


#3 posted 07-26-2016 01:46 AM

I’ve got some wormy chestnut but it’s been planed ( it’s also quarter sawn) so it would be hard to compare. If you go look at it, take an orbital sander and sand off a little area, wet it and it should be a deep golden color. As well, the worm tracks should be prominent.
I can get a couple pics if you want

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

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BobAnderton

219 posts in 2256 days


#4 posted 07-26-2016 02:08 AM

If the seller doesn’t know whether it’s oak or wormy chestnut I wouldn’t put much confidence in his guesses.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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recycle1943

1158 posts in 1088 days


#5 posted 07-26-2016 10:28 AM

Here’s a couple pics of some quarter sawn wormy chestnut that I’m shaping. no finish on it yet but you can see the grain pattern , might help and ditto what Bob said.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1942 days


#6 posted 07-26-2016 11:36 AM

Sorry recycle, but that is not wormy chestnut. Chestnut is in the oak and beech family. In oak, the medullary rays are very large and visible to the naked eye. You can see them easily on the faces of your boards. The ones in your pics are very large, and the boards appear to be white oak. One oak in the white oak group is chestnut oak. It has leaves a bit similar to chestnut, but the wood has very large distinct medullary rays like all the other oaks in the white oak group. Maybe what you have is chestnut oak.

In chestnut, the medullary rays are tiny and are not visible to the naked eye. You need a hand lens to see them. The ability to easily see the medullary rays on the face of a board or on the end grain is one of the first tests to distinguish oak from chestnut.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#7 posted 07-26-2016 12:21 PM

The seller got back to me and the “wood expert” they got the board from told them it’s tulip poplar so my interest is gone, especially for that price. Thanks for all the replies.

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recycle1943

1158 posts in 1088 days


#8 posted 07-26-2016 03:01 PM

@WDHLT15 – I don’t for a second doubt your expertise about wood but this is not white oak. It could possibly be chestnut oak as you say but the density and weight make me believe it’s not an oak and quite frankly, I don’t care because it’s so beautiful and nice to work.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

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recycle1943

1158 posts in 1088 days


#9 posted 07-26-2016 03:03 PM



The seller got back to me and the “wood expert” they got the board from told them it s tulip poplar so my interest is gone, especially for that price. Thanks for all the replies.

- bigblockyeti

Tulip Poplar ? pretty difficult to mistake that for oak or chestnut, glad you didn’t make a trip just for disappointment

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#10 posted 07-26-2016 04:01 PM

Yeah me too!

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Tony_S

607 posts in 2549 days


#11 posted 07-26-2016 11:42 PM



@WDHLT15 – I don t for a second doubt your expertise about wood but this is not white oak. It could possibly be chestnut oak as you say but the density and weight make me believe it s not an oak and quite frankly, I don t care because it s so beautiful and nice to work.

- recycle1943

Dick

I realize you said you don’t care and that’s all good, but others may get confused. Wood I.D. is pretty confusing for a lot of the rookies on this site.

For the sake of clarity for others.

Danny is 100% correct…what you have in the pic is quarter sawn white oak(Quercus alba). It may or may not be quartered chestnut oak (Quercus prinus)...doesn’t really matter, because chestnut oak is in the white oak ‘family’(Leucobalanus). It looks like it may have a slight pink/reddish hue as well, which isn’t uncommon in white oak(but leads some to believe it might be red oak).
He was also correct when he said American chestnut has no medulary rays visible to the naked eye.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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