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Remove Scratch from Table

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Forum topic by pnewelljr posted 07-25-2016 12:56 AM 430 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


07-25-2016 12:56 AM

I just purchased a solid walnut table, and day 1 my spouse gets a nice scratch on the top. I was wondering what the best way to handle this would be.

The table is from a Japanese brand, and the most I could find out is that the finish is “urethane resin paint”, which I am guessing is just polyurethane?

Here is a picture of the scratch:

It isn’t that bad, but you can definitely feel it if you run your finger over it. What would be the best way to address and/or remove it?


19 replies so far

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Aj2

692 posts in 1262 days


#1 posted 07-25-2016 02:02 AM

I’ve found the best way to handle it is to say nicely in a loud voice don’t scratch the table. :)
To hide the scratch I would start with a little paste wax.
0000 steel wool might help blend it in on a matte finish but you might end up doing the whole table.
It’s really hard to give good advise without being there in person.

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#2 posted 07-25-2016 02:03 AM

What brand and type of paste wax? I’ve been having trouble finding one.

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Kirk650

294 posts in 213 days


#3 posted 07-25-2016 02:08 AM

You can get paste wax in various shades of brown and specifically in walnut shades. What I’m saying is that you can hide the scratch somewhat. Eliminating it is going to be much tougher

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#4 posted 07-25-2016 02:10 AM

Yah, I am considering trying to eliminate it, but if that isn’t possible just protecting the wood until the eventual (a few years down the road) refinishing would be the goal.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 167 days


#5 posted 07-25-2016 02:15 AM

Yep paste wax is a good place to start. Urethane could be darn near anything, id use a soft cloth before I went with the 0000 wool just in case, if it doesn’t work no harm no foul. Thing is if you can feel it that means there is a vertical plane to the finish were the scratch is, which is rough and faceted like a diamond sorta, if you fold up some 0000 wool and use your thumb nail to run it through the scratch to smooth out the insides then wax it, that helps hide it a lot better don’t know if that makes sense but think about, it works or helps anyway. Learned that from an 82 year old pro. Of course you could always break out the hand plane flatten it and refinish it, that’s my favorite op.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#6 posted 07-25-2016 02:16 AM

Yah, that makes sense. So I would want to use a colored wax then? Even if I am pretty sure the finish was clear?

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#7 posted 07-25-2016 03:37 AM

Would it work to sand it with steel wool and then try to fill with a wipe on poly?

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DirtyMike

461 posts in 366 days


#8 posted 07-25-2016 04:10 AM

you may end up with a worse result trying to cover it with another poly, That has been my experience anyway. try the wax and 0000 wool method, you may be surprised.

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#9 posted 07-25-2016 04:15 AM

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DirtyMike

461 posts in 366 days


#10 posted 07-25-2016 04:24 AM

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#11 posted 07-25-2016 02:10 PM

Great thanks, I’ll check it out.

Two followup questions:

1. When I see that I should sand with the grain, that means back and forth longways right?
2. Will these waxes make the wood shiny? The table currently has a satin finish. Also, will I need to apply it to the whole table? Or just around the scratch? Will it blend in with the rest of the table finish?

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JBrow

818 posts in 385 days


#12 posted 07-25-2016 06:42 PM

pnewelljr,

On my best day I know little about finishing and less than that when it comes to finish repairs. For what it is worth, I do nevertheless have some thoughts.

Unless you know otherwise, it is a good bet that the top is a walnut veneer over a substrate. If the scratch is through the finish and into the wood, great care sanding (including with steel wool) the area could prevent a much bigger headache than the scratch now presents.

It is probably a good bet that after working the scratched area, it will have a different appearance from that of the surrounding area. Therefore, treating the entire top in the same manner as the scratched area may be required to end with an invisible repair.

Whatever plan you develop to repair the scratch, it may be a good idea to practice the procedure on a concealed area of the table. One such area could be the inside of a leg near the top. If lucky, perhaps the underside of the top was also finished like the upper side of the top. If this is the case, practicing on the underside of the top would be even better. If you do not like the appearance after going through the practice procedure, at least the highly visible top has not been made worse.

Another option to consider is make no attempt to remove the scratch. Depending on where the scratch happens to be, a narrow table runner down the center of the table could cover the scratch. Whether or not a repair is attempted, a coat or two of furniture past wax could offer a little additional protection from future scratches. Not only would the wax add a thin additional layer of protection, but it would allow objects placed on the table to slide rather than dig in, reducing the chances of a future scratch.

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 557 days


#13 posted 07-25-2016 06:53 PM

Thanks for the additional advice.

I am certain that this is solid walnut and not a veneer, so that shouldn’t be a problem. The bottom of the table is finished the same, so I am going to take your advice and try the wax and steel wool there first to see how it blends.

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Aj2

692 posts in 1262 days


#14 posted 07-25-2016 06:56 PM



Great thanks, I ll check it out.

Two followup questions:

1. When I see that I should sand with the grain, that means back and forth longways right?
2. Will these waxes make the wood shiny? The table currently has a satin finish. Also, will I need to apply it to the whole table? Or just around the scratch? Will it blend in with the rest of the table finish?

I really think you should avoid the idea of refining the whole table for that little scratch.
Get your wax in hand first.I don’t even really think you need colored wax it might help a little.
When you get your wax use some blue masking tape and tape around the offening mark.Who ever has the best eyes in the house should do it.Get very close to the edges.And work some wax in the defect.
Wait a bit have a cup of coffee,Say a prayer,Cross fingers.Maybe do something nice for a complete stranger.
Then pull the tape.

Aj

- pnewelljr


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Aj2

692 posts in 1262 days


#15 posted 07-25-2016 06:59 PM

One more thing I thought about.After you pull the tape if the wax sits a little proud of the surface that’s good.
Just carefully buff it down with a old cotton shirt.

Aj

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