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Grizzly G0457 and the 3/4" Lenox Trimaster carbide blade

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Forum topic by blaughn posted 07-24-2016 01:46 PM 2337 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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blaughn

16 posts in 132 days


07-24-2016 01:46 PM

I took delivery of a G0457 bandsaw in early June. I am trying to run a Lenox 3/4” Trimaster carbide blade but it is not producing the kind of cut I was expecting. Resawing 4” oak, the blade cuts smoothly for a short distance then squeals, cut speed increases and the blade cuts roughly then the saw returns to a smoother cut. (There is no tire slippage)

Using the “blade fluctuation” method for attaining tension, the tensioning spring is completely compressed when the blade is finally stabilized. The tension is so tight, I cannot de-tension the blade without bending the de-tensioning handle.

I am not expecting a “no sanding finish” from the saw but the cut is not much better than rough-cut lumber. This is my first quality bandsaw and I am struggling to understand what my expectations should be. I am wondering if the problem is with the Lenox blade…...

-- Don't ever run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas at the same time.


22 replies so far

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 978 days


#1 posted 07-24-2016 02:56 PM

I think your expectations are too high. A band saw is a roughing tool. The cut quality can vary depending on the saw, blade and saw set up but it’s not going to be a similar finish as a jointed or planed surface.

I also think you have the blade tensioned much higher than it should be. If the tension handle is bending then you are probably flexing the frame of the saw as well.

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joey502

487 posts in 978 days


#2 posted 07-24-2016 03:01 PM

Check out the videos and techniques of alex Snodgrass and Michael Fortune. They will have all the info needed.

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NoSpace

73 posts in 700 days


#3 posted 07-24-2016 03:11 PM

I have the 1/2” trimaster on my Laguna. I’ve been using bandsaws about a year and a half and still question whether I know how to set one up right based on comments I read here and there about cut quality.

When your cut speed suddenly increases, is that because of the grain of that particular chunk of wood? Or is it that exact pattern with every piece of wood?

What I’ve noticed compared to several half-inch blades I’ve tried: Just us rough with bandsaw marks, produces 10x the sawdust, louder, doesn’t cut any faster. However, it’s more stable—less cupping. After taking a slice of veneer, the surface is flat enough to go again instead of planing in between. Measuring with calipers and it seems to produce really even pieces. The real test is blade life. If this blade lasts 10x longer than my others, then I consider it a success.

I seem to have read comments about “polished” results but not sure I buy it. If it were true, then table saws and planers would start going to the trash. There are expert woodworkers who prefer not to use carbide blades and are happy resharpening all the time. You don’t find that with table saw blades—you don’t find pros that refuse to use carbide circular blades. If they were that good, then they’d take over the market and doesn’t seem to be happening.

also careful on tension. I under-tension my trimaster and slowly working up. that’s an expensive blade if it breaks…

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3283 days


#4 posted 07-24-2016 05:43 PM

I have the same BS and have used it for many years. Would recommend a 1/2 blade most perfer the Woodslicer by Highland tools….I did change out factor tire to the orange urethane tire and what a great running machine since. Best wishes on your new saw be safe and enjoy….Blackcherry

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amt

49 posts in 1178 days


#5 posted 07-24-2016 05:54 PM

That saw may not be strong enough to tension that blade properly. Based on your comments about the tension spring I am pretty confident that is the case. Not many saws can tension that blade and generally cost $2500 or more.

-- -Andrew

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Aj2

686 posts in 1258 days


#6 posted 07-24-2016 06:54 PM

I agree with the saw too small.I had a1/2 tri master on my 14 much powermatic Bs.It never felt like it was tight enough.The cut was rougher then when it was on the bigger saw.The band finally broke.
The problem switch the slow and fast feed could be the rear bearing are too far back.Try resetting them closer.
Also check to see if wood fiber are bundleing up on the back of the throat plate.Sometimes they can get stuck behind the blade.The wood kinda drags on them till they get sucked down or pushed away.
Hope you get it worked out .
Good luck

Aj

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blaughn

16 posts in 132 days


#7 posted 07-26-2016 01:14 PM

Thank you for your input. I am having better luck with the 1/2” Lenox Die Master.

I am unimpressed with the Grizzly quality control for this saw. They had to replace the table (trunion mounting holes mis-aligned) The tensioning screw (threads galled), bent tensioning handle, and now I sit here with a 3/4” Trimaster that flutters unless you fully compress the tension spring. After all of the replacement parts and having to realign nearly every aspect of the table and guide bearings – the saw seems to be running well. It only took 52 days to get here.
It is a bummer to spend hours researching bandsaws, buying one that is highly recommended as a “best value” choice and run into all these disappointments.

-- Don't ever run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas at the same time.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

686 posts in 847 days


#8 posted 07-26-2016 04:44 PM

Anyone having trouble setting up or getting a good cut on a bandsaw ( manufacturing quality issues not withstanding) should checkout Alex Snodgrass’ YouTube video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU
The most important thing that I learned from this video was the proper way to align the blade. Most instructions, including my Grizzly bandsaw, tell you to center the blade on the crown of the wheel. Definitely an aha moment for me after hearing his explanation.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3313 posts in 3283 days


#9 posted 07-26-2016 05:46 PM

Sorry to hear about all the mishaps you’ve encountered on your new BS. I remember when I received mine I wasn’t to happy with some issues as well, but over time I’ve solved them and now I couldn’t be more happier with my unit. Most new band saw owner give up and sell because how fickle the unit can be. It takes practice setting up and adjusting. Once you’ve master the set up and tensioning it a go to tool that is incredible , so yes a learning curve is in the works. Stay patient and thing will fall into place, don’t give up the ship. WC
,

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joey502

487 posts in 978 days


#10 posted 07-26-2016 06:11 PM

Did you measure the 3/4 blade length? The blade could be a dash too long and cause the tensioning issue.

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blaughn

16 posts in 132 days


#11 posted 07-26-2016 09:11 PM



Did you measure the 3/4 blade length? The blade could be a dash too long and cause the tensioning issue.

- joey502

I don’t think that is the issue. I have further travel available on the tensioning screw. The problem is to get rid of the flutter with the Lenox 3/4” carbide Trimaster blade, I have to completely compress the tension spring – not a good solution and a quick end to the blade. I am of the opinion that the saw would probably handle non-carbide 3/4 inch blade but the tensioning spring is simply not strong enough for the 20,000++ psi needed for this blade.

-- Don't ever run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas at the same time.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

686 posts in 847 days


#12 posted 07-26-2016 11:35 PM

The springs are fairly easy to replace with stronger springs. I remember a Woodsmith or Shop Notes article a few years back suggesting that this was a great way to improve a bandsaw’s performance.

Also, have you tried contacting Lenox support? Out of curiosity, I went and looked at their support page and found this contact info in their “Guide to Bandsawing” PDF. Even if you aren’t having problems with your saw, it’s got some good information in it.

You can get technical assistance for solving your band sawing problems by phone.
Our Technical Support staff is here to serve you and can be reached during normal
working hours by calling our toll-free number:
413-526-6504
800-642-0010
Fax: 413-525-9611
800-265-9221

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View blaughn's profile

blaughn

16 posts in 132 days


#13 posted 07-27-2016 12:21 AM



The springs are fairly easy to replace with stronger springs. I remember a Woodsmith or Shop Notes article a few years back suggesting that this was a great way to improve a bandsaw s performance.

Also, have you tried contacting Lenox support? Out of curiosity, I went and looked at their support page and found this contact info in their “Guide to Bandsawing” PDF. Even if you aren t having problems with your saw, it s got some good information in it.

You can get technical assistance for solving your band sawing problems by phone.
Our Technical Support staff is here to serve you and can be reached during normal
working hours by calling our toll-free number:
413-526-6504
800-642-0010
Fax: 413-525-9611
800-265-9221

- Lazyman

Thanks LM. I hope to talk with Grizzly tech support tomorrow. I will see if they sell a stiffer tensioning spring. Great input, Thanks!

-- Don't ever run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas at the same time.

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Lazyman

686 posts in 847 days


#14 posted 07-27-2016 03:09 AM

I suspect that Grizzly will just have the stock springs, though it is possible that they have some upgrades. They may also have some advice for getting the best cut from this blade. You might check some of the woodworking supply stores for upgraded springs. For example, with a quick search I found that Woodcraft and Amazon carry Cobra Coil Bandsaw Tension Spring

(I don’t have any experience with this particular spring. It is just an example and you would need to make sure that it fits your saw and that it is actually an upgrade since your saw is fairly new.)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

25 posts in 293 days


#15 posted 07-27-2016 04:11 AM

I have had this saw for a long time. Starting out I had problems with the cut quality, noise etc… I followed the Snodgrass video and have never looked back. For re saw I use a 3/4 Woodslicer.

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