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Corded drills; does which one matter?

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Forum topic by m88k posted 05-14-2010 07:25 AM 2599 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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m88k

83 posts in 2417 days


05-14-2010 07:25 AM

My 14.4v Skil cordless drill is great, but runs out of juice too fast, and occasionally runs out of torque. So, time to get a corded; last time I was at my parents we couldn’t find their spare, so it’s shopping time.

The question is; does it matter which drill you get? They all seem to be similar in power (I’m playing in the 6-8amp range) every model has good reviews, and pricing is so similar across the board there’s no reason to get anything but the one you want.

I’m thinking I’ll just grab the Milwaukee, which appears to be one of the better deals available, but is there any reason to go with one over another?

-- ~Mark


23 replies so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#1 posted 05-14-2010 08:29 AM

I don’t have a 3/8 drill from them, but all their tools have given me good service.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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docholladay

1287 posts in 2524 days


#2 posted 05-14-2010 10:44 AM

You won’t go wrong with Milwaukee. I owned one of their holeshot drills years ago that was great. They have a lot of torque so be careful if a bit should grab and stop spinning. It will hurt your wrist. Currently, I have a Makita that I like a lot. It is one that can be used as a conventional drill or, by flipping a swithc, it becomes a light duty hammer drill. That comes in handy if you ever drill holes in masonry. I would not recommend one with a keyless chuck. On a corded drill, they have so much torque that the chuck will spin in your hand when trying to hold the chuck to tighten the bit. It hurts a lot when that thing spins in your hand. I prefer a traditional keyed chuck on a corded drill.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#3 posted 05-14-2010 01:30 PM

I tend to agree that there is not much difference from one to the other with corded drills. I don’t use mine much but I have a corded Black and Decker hammer drill. It only costs about $60 and it does what I need it to do.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Marc's profile

Marc

101 posts in 2474 days


#4 posted 05-14-2010 02:10 PM

I just bought a corded drill a few weeks ago for basically the same reasons. I picked up the Ridgid R5013 for $50 when it was on sale at HD. I think if you stick with a brand you trust you probably won’t go wrong.

-- Marc, http://www.logicallymarc.com/

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knotscott

7215 posts in 2840 days


#5 posted 05-14-2010 02:17 PM

Milwaukee is a good choice, as are Makita, Ridgid, Hitachi, Ridgid, Bosch, Panasonic, or DW. If you liked your Skil, you’re gonna love any of these. Go with what fits your hands well. For driving and removing screws, I’d consider going with an impact drive as opposed to a regular drill….they’re pretty amazing if you’ve never used one.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2899 days


#6 posted 05-14-2010 03:05 PM

I have found Milwaukee tools to be well made, very durable and reasonably priced.
Also know that Milwaukee router bits are Feud bits and cost less – great value and performance.

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.

View Chase's profile

Chase

448 posts in 2491 days


#7 posted 05-14-2010 03:24 PM

I love my dewalt 18v. It is a bit expensive, but that drill packs a punch and lasts a while.

-- Every neighborhood has an eccentric neighbor. I wondered for years "who was ours?" Then I realized it was me.

View PCM's profile

PCM

135 posts in 2510 days


#8 posted 05-14-2010 03:37 PM

Check out CPO refurbished tools. You can choose from Bosch, Makita, PC, DeWalt and I think Milwaukee and often save a lot of $. I have found them to be a reliable company. Additionally, battery operated tools which are professional grade will hold a charge longer and do much more work between charges. I had skill and craftsman coordless drills and was quite frustrated with their performance. I finally upgraded to Makita 18 volt Lithium (bought it new on a great deal at the time from Amazon) and could not be happier. Its well worth the extra money.

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m88k

83 posts in 2417 days


#9 posted 05-14-2010 04:26 PM

I’ve noticed for the price the Makita units have much lower power ratings. Just something odd.

Lithium impact drivers are tempting, but I want to drill, not only drive, and I believe the corded drill easily suits my needs best.

-- ~Mark

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#10 posted 05-15-2010 02:32 AM

I wouldn’t even bother buying a battery drill for occasional homeowner use. Too spendy and the batteries need a good work out to get the best life out of them.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7215 posts in 2840 days


#11 posted 05-15-2010 10:56 AM

”I’ve noticed for the price the Makita units have much lower power ratings. Just something odd.”

Mark – Not all “volts” are created equal. Torque is an important aspect of usable power. The better brand names like Makita, Bosch, Milwaukee, etc. have plenty of usable power. If you were happy with the power of the 14.4v Skil, you will likely also be very happy with a 10.8v (or higher) driver from one of the better names. The drill/impact driver combo kits tend to offer more bang for the buck…check out sale prices or refurbished too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View syenefarmer's profile

syenefarmer

432 posts in 2545 days


#12 posted 05-15-2010 02:22 PM

I have two corded drills, a Milwaukee 0234-1 and a Makita Hammer Drill. For brute power, you can’t beat the Milwaukee plus they’re built like a tank. However for versatility the Makita does have some advantages over my Milwaukee. With the Makita I have the added advantage of the hammer mode which speaks for itself but it also has a higher RPM output which comes in handy when drilling pocket holes.

View Chris Cunanan's profile

Chris Cunanan

339 posts in 2945 days


#13 posted 05-15-2010 03:38 PM

i do medical construction and we use drivers/impacts all day….i frequently get to switch between a newer ridgid/dewalt/makita/ryobi and older milwaukee…to me, they all have sufficient power with a good battery charged just about all the time…the main difference i feel is how much Lighter and more comfortable the Makita is over the others, as well as how much longer the battery lasts and how much Quicker the recharges are….just thought i’d throw some first-hand user experience into the bunch…good luck with ur purchase

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hazbro

109 posts in 2455 days


#14 posted 05-15-2010 08:53 PM

I run the 8 amp milwaukee. I mix thinset and grout all the time and this drill can handle a whole bag, just like the bigger drills. It’s just harder on the wrists.

I’ve fried several other drills.

-- measure once, keep cuttin' til it fits

View m88k's profile

m88k

83 posts in 2417 days


#15 posted 05-16-2010 02:39 AM

Knotscott: I was actually talking about the Makita plug-in drills. For the same price range, they’re in the 4 amp range when the other good brands are in the 6-9 amp range. Seeing as the worst electric motors are still provide about 80% efficiency, I highly doubt a 4.5amp Makita is comparable in power to an 8 amp Milwaukee

My landlord has what appears to be an identical Skil; except that it’s not worth the plastic it was stamped from. The battery is in bad shape, but even using my battery it runs out of torque a lot faster. I assume there are some bad connections leading to much higher resistive losses inside. Mine was all of 20 bucks, and came with a remote controlled car; it served me well when there weren’t any sockets available to work from, but plugs are now available.

I think I’m going to grab the Hitachi D10VH; a little less power, but it’s cheaper, locally available, and has ports to add a side handle.

Are the cordless impact drivers better at driving screws than a corded drill? I’ve heard they’re less likely to strip out screws.

-- ~Mark

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