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Refurbed 80 year old vise

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Forum topic by hackery posted 07-22-2016 09:47 PM 709 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hackery

49 posts in 179 days


07-22-2016 09:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: refurbished vise refurb antique repair old fixed paint job

First of all sorry if a vise is not classed as a fixture…. so feel free to move this post if it’s in the wrong place.

Some stage last year I purchased a very sorry looking rusted shut wood working vise from a local man’s garage (Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK). I paid the equivalent of $20 US on it. I had to literally drop it in a tub of rust removal gel to get the mechanism to free up and I used it for a few months before deciding to refurb it.

I took the wood jaws from it and sandblasted the whole piece with silica sand…. first time sandblasting not recommended doing it in shorts. A few coats of primer and then several coats of gold automotive canned spray paint. I then attempted to hand paint the raised letters which sort of turned out ok but not as well as I would have liked but the cast letters were not great to begin with when factory fresh. Then I applied several coats of gloss lacquer / clear coat to give it a very tough and slightly glossy finish and then new 18mm ply jaws. Perhaps not up to the showroom quality of some of the vise’s / benches you see online but I am pleased with the result and enjoyed bringing what is essentially an antique back to fully working order with a new dare I say “glamours” gold semi gloss finish.

Very little information online but I believe the vise dates from the 1930s the lettering says Parkinsons Perfect Vise 15 & Made in England. It’s a rock solid vise and weighs a ton.

A few before, progress and after shots…

Before

Blasted

Primed

Finished

-- Notice woodworker and now metal worker - Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK


17 replies so far

View JoeinGa's profile (online now)

JoeinGa

7491 posts in 1475 days


#1 posted 07-22-2016 10:27 PM

Great looking vice. NICE refurb !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Trapper brandenburger's profile

Trapper brandenburger

18 posts in 170 days


#2 posted 07-22-2016 10:57 PM

That is a great find man! You did a great job refurbishing that too, what a classic look. Thanks for sharing.

-- -Trapper

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3024 posts in 1719 days


#3 posted 07-22-2016 11:01 PM

Beautiful restoration of a vintage vise! Bravo!

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#4 posted 07-22-2016 11:30 PM

That’s a solid vise, how wide do the jaws open? you could install longer jaw liners so it could grab wider stock but they have to be thicker than the plywood you have there, very nice vise,I’m happy for you.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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hackery

49 posts in 179 days


#5 posted 07-23-2016 08:01 AM

Thanks very much gentlemen much appreciated.

Distrbd… the metal jaws without liners open out to a full 15 inches (381mm since you are Canadian and use metric like me) which is pretty much all I would ever need. What sort of size of liners are you thinking of? I have used this vise in it’s un-refurbed state for 4 or 5 months with the same size of liners that I have on it now and never encountered any issues but most of my projects are small(ish). Also where I live there is a very limited number of lumber yards and for the most part wood comes in 8 inch wide boards with a few wider exceptions in PAR pine but I rarely work with pine unless I am making something for the workshop.

I have been considering using hardwood for the liners just for fanciness sake as I don’t think there would be any actual practical benefit over plywood. I have maple, walnut, cherry, sapelle and oak… any advice on using hardwood liners over plywood and if so what species would be better from what I listed?

Thanks

-- Notice woodworker and now metal worker - Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

347 posts in 1884 days


#6 posted 07-23-2016 11:37 AM

some info

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/J._Parkinson_and_Son

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

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hackery

49 posts in 179 days


#7 posted 07-23-2016 11:46 AM



some info

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/J._Parkinson_and_Son

- BigYin

Cheers BigYin so looking at that site the vise could date anywhere from 1920s up to the 1950s. Even if it’s a later model still going strong at 60 years plus. I already found the post war 1945 ad poster which features my model in the middle of the poster I am a web and graphic designer by trade so going to clean it up, increase the resolution and get it professionally printed to frame and hang in my workshop a nice touch I think to go along with the vise.

-- Notice woodworker and now metal worker - Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

View TheTurtleCarpenter's profile

TheTurtleCarpenter

828 posts in 534 days


#8 posted 07-23-2016 11:57 AM

I think you picked up and restored a real gem of a vise.. Plywood liners are just fine.

-- "Tying shoelaces was way harder than learning to Whistle",,,,,member MWTCA area K. Kentucky

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

262 posts in 1286 days


#9 posted 07-23-2016 01:46 PM

Hackery, there appears to be some sort of a thumb latch, low on the right side. Is that a quick release feature?

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#10 posted 07-23-2016 02:14 PM

never encountered any issues but most of my projects are small(ish). Also where I live there is a very limited number of lumber yards and for the most part wood comes in 8 inch wide boards with a few wider exceptions in PAR pine but I rarely work with pine unless I am making something for the workshop.

... any advice on using hardwood liners over plywood and if so what species would be better from what I listed?

Thanks

- hackery


Hackery, the plywood liner seems to work well for you and that’s all that matters,plus it makes the vise look great, the only reason I mentioned slightly longer liners (sticking out 2” on either side) is they’ll give you a bit more capacity, but since you work with smaller projects , then there’s no need for that, it was just a suggestion,I’m no expert by any means, it was suggested to me when I found an old Record vise, the wood I used as liners was 1”Maple. here’s what I’m talking about(pics are from Google/ not my vise):
Bytheway,I’d like to see the final printed picture of it in your workshop.don’t forget to post a few pics.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#11 posted 07-23-2016 04:41 PM

Great job on the vise.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View hackery's profile

hackery

49 posts in 179 days


#12 posted 07-23-2016 05:27 PM

Turtle Carpenter… thanks appreciate that.

Gentile.. yeah the thumb catch is quick release according to the internet Parkinsons were the people that invented the quick release mech long before Record (I also have a vintage Record also a good vise just smaller) the spring on my vise is still tip top apprently that’s one of the only things to watch out for and cracking but don’t think you could crack it with a cruise liner.

Rick.. thanks appreciate the feedback

distrdb… yeah my old Record (also vintage bought from the same fella as my Parkinsons) has wider liners as per your pics so did the Parkinsons before it’s refurb but tried and ultimately failed to go for a cleaner look when reinstalling after its refurb on my new bench with the back liner in line with the front apron of the bench . Problem with the Parkinsons vise apart from a football being squarer than it at the back it wasnt flush it has curved supports two of them which also taper from wide at the bottom to narrow at the top so install wasn’t as smooth as I would have liked but eventually got it so it is at least level and square to the bench with a bit of fettling and a shim or two. Pretty much built the bench around the vise as first bench which I built as literally my very first ever woodworking project was just a table rather than a traditional style bench with the overhang for the vise.

-- Notice woodworker and now metal worker - Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

View JohnDon's profile

JohnDon

61 posts in 637 days


#13 posted 07-25-2016 01:50 AM

Beautiful restoration, and it was certainly a terrific deal, in terms of dollars/pound, (should it be pounds/kilo, or, dare I say, pounds/pound?).

Call me parochial, but I didn’t notice anything odd about the lettering, until I saw in the Graces Guide reference: “1913 Advert for Vises (Parkinson’s spelling)”. We are perhaps still “two nations divided by a common language.”

View hackery's profile

hackery

49 posts in 179 days


#14 posted 07-25-2016 06:14 AM

Thanks John.

Yes I have noticed this and they dropped the apostrophe at some stage during their history. My vise was without the apostrophe. Not sure what year it was dropped.

-- Notice woodworker and now metal worker - Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

View JohnDon's profile

JohnDon

61 posts in 637 days


#15 posted 07-26-2016 05:53 AM

Actually, I was referring to the “vise” spelling, not the Parkinson possessive. My recollection is that “vice” is the more common British spelling- is that correct?

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