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Table top tolerance.

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Forum topic by Plain posted 07-22-2016 02:19 PM 571 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Plain

157 posts in 159 days


07-22-2016 02:19 PM

What tolerance would you expect from a good cabinet table saw when it comes to the table top flatness ? Mine is convex 0.025” out of the box, enough to for the wood to hit the extension/table step when sliding left-right and t spin due to having only one point of contact with the table. But I admit I could have been spoiled by my previous saws that had tables flat enough to not cause any worries. Please do not bring Ford better than GMC here.


13 replies so far

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2528 days


#1 posted 07-22-2016 02:35 PM

Most saws and it varries by brand but you will see 5 – 10 thou per foot. It also mattters where its at. If it’s away from where the blade hits the wood probably not a deal killer. Not quite getting from you description whet it might be a problem. Is it a wing thats got a high spot?

Have you called the manufacturere? I recently bought a jobsite saw that was out and sent it back.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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HokieKen

1740 posts in 599 days


#2 posted 07-22-2016 04:32 PM

If it’s crowned enough to allow wood to spin freely, IMHO, that’s an un-usable saw. I’d get in touch with the manufacturer or the retailer and get it replaced if it’s new. My TS is 25 years old and has less than .015 out-of-flatness. A new one should be no more than .005-.010 depending on the price point.

And Ford IS better than GM ;P

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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diverlloyd

1437 posts in 1318 days


#3 posted 07-22-2016 08:03 PM

Very nice comment Kenny, I knew someone would keep it going.

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Aj2

687 posts in 1259 days


#4 posted 07-22-2016 10:38 PM

I’m curious what others say about their saw tops.Mine has a .008 gap across the middle of the throat plate.Front to back is very flat .001 to .002.
My saw is over 50 years old.
I get very good rips cuts not glue ready but I make due.

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unbob

718 posts in 1364 days


#5 posted 07-23-2016 05:53 PM

I looked at a tag on a new Powermatic 66 some years ago, it read, the top not to exceed .010” for flatness. That is the only reference I have ever seen regarding any specification on a table saw. My own Delta 12-14” is better then .004” for its 38” X 48” surface with wings.

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Redoak49

1940 posts in 1450 days


#6 posted 07-23-2016 06:07 PM

You are just beating this to death….didn’t you get enough on your Sawstop threads

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knotscott

7209 posts in 2837 days


#7 posted 07-23-2016 06:55 PM

It really depends on where the deviations are on the table and whether are not they affect the cut. Cut quality is the real test IMO. Flat is fine, but if the saw cuts well, all is good.

Lots of people drive themselves crazy because their saw table isn’t perfectly flat, but don’t even bother to do some test cuts first. If it looks flat and cuts right, don’t even bother to try to measure for flatness.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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jbay

811 posts in 360 days


#8 posted 07-23-2016 07:11 PM

I never have checked my Unisaw. (20 or so years)
I’ve never had any problems, but then, maybe that’s why I can’t cut straight… :>/
However my wings ARE flush!

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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Aj2

687 posts in 1259 days


#9 posted 07-23-2016 07:37 PM


I looked at a tag on a new Powermatic 66 some years ago, it read, the top not to exceed .010” for flatness. That is the only reference I have ever seen regarding any specification on a table saw. My own Delta 12-14” is better then .004” for its 38” X 48” surface with wings.

- unbob


Hi Bob do you or are able to get glue ready cuts from your saw.
Some say they do but i have never owned or ran a saw that was acceptible to me.
I think I saw one once it belonged to Sam Maloof.
Maybe I’m too picky but I almost always clean tablesaw edges.Sometmes my foreplane sometimes my jointer.

I think maybe my saws top has sagged over time since the trunnions and motor all hang from the underside of the top.
I have a Davis and wells with 3/4 inch arbor 12 inch 2hp.Its a nice compact saw that runs very smooth.It also has a very unique rack and scroll gear to raise and lover the blade.

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 979 days


#10 posted 07-23-2016 08:53 PM

like others have said, I think where the dips and bumps are will effect how much of an issue it is. .025” is a large tolerance in my opinion though.

What measuring tools are you using to get these results?

View Plain's profile

Plain

157 posts in 159 days


#11 posted 07-23-2016 09:00 PM


like others have said, I think where the dips and bumps are will effect how much of an issue it is. .025” is a large tolerance in my opinion though.

What measuring tools are you using to get these results?

- joey502

Just got this replaced. Seems to be damage in shipment. The new one is about 0.006”.
I just looked at the specifications. The accepted tolerance is 0.10” measured diagonally for the table only. For table with wings 0.025” considered acceptable.

View Plain's profile

Plain

157 posts in 159 days


#12 posted 07-23-2016 09:09 PM


Hi Bob do you or are able to get glue ready cuts from your saw.
Some say they do but i have never owned or ran a saw that was acceptible to me.
I think I saw one once it belonged to Sam Maloof.
Maybe I m too picky but I almost always clean tablesaw edges.Sometmes my foreplane sometimes my jointer.

I think maybe my saws top has sagged over time since the trunnions and motor all hang from the underside of the top.
I have a Davis and wells with 3/4 inch arbor 12 inch 2hp.Its a nice compact saw that runs very smooth.It also has a very unique rack and scroll gear to raise and lover the blade.

- Aj2

I do not think a curved table is to blame. Most probably a dull or misaligned blade. I noticed when a 10” thin kerf blade is misaligned 0.010” or more the teeth start catching up the wood on the back side and create marks. Besides that bring some safety concerns.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1364 days


#13 posted 07-23-2016 11:22 PM


Hi Bob do you or are able to get glue ready cuts from your saw.
Some say they do but i have never owned or ran a saw that was acceptible to me.
I think I saw one once it belonged to Sam Maloof.
Maybe I m too picky but I almost always clean tablesaw edges.Sometmes my foreplane sometimes my jointer.

I think maybe my saws top has sagged over time since the trunnions and motor all hang from the underside of the top.
I have a Davis and wells with 3/4 inch arbor 12 inch 2hp.Its a nice compact saw that runs very smooth.It also has a very unique rack and scroll gear to raise and lover the blade.

- Aj2

I do not think a curved table is to blame. Most probably a dull or misaligned blade. I noticed when a 10” thin kerf blade is misaligned 0.010” or more the teeth start catching up the wood on the back side and create marks. Besides that bring some safety concerns.

- Plain

I have to say, I get the best edges with a hand plane, so I usually just use a general purpose blades on my saws and finish by hand for the most invisible glue lines that I can get.

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