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Forum topic by pnewelljr posted 07-21-2016 07:47 PM 396 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pnewelljr

22 posts in 553 days


07-21-2016 07:47 PM

I am modifying a piece of furniture, and need help with a simple temporary joint (non load barring).

Im short, I have a sofa that has four legs that screw in. I want to replace these round screw in legs with rectangular ones. That is easy.

After that though, I want to add a longer piece in between each leg. This piece could easily be pressed on between the two legs. The legs are what will carry the load, these press on pieces are just for asthetics. I create a mockup of what the finished piece will look like.

How it looks now:

How I want it to look:

I am thinking the four corners could screw on as usual, then I could add two nails to each leg, put a nail shaped cut into the long planks, and then just push them on or pull them off at will. The only thing I am not sure of is how stable this will be, I obviously don’t want them just falling off. The pieces would look like this:

Let me know what you think or if there is a better option. I am looking for easy of install and teardown and creation. Don’t have tons of wood working experience.


12 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#1 posted 07-21-2016 10:55 PM

1. How are going to screw the legs with a board attached to them?
2. If you screw the legs on first, how are you going to fit a doweled board between them?

-- Bondo Gaposis

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

817 posts in 381 days


#2 posted 07-22-2016 12:40 AM

pnewelljr,

I would be a little uncomfortable with your press fit solution for the reasons you state. As the sofa is scooted across the floor, the rail kicked, or whenever the sofa is moved, like when the carpets are cleaned, the slots in the long rails could widen if the legs flex, even a little bit. Feet flexing one time probably would not be much of a problem if the slot in the long rail is just right, but several flexes may become problematic.

I am not big on pocket screws, being a bit of a purist. However, this may be a perfect application for pocket screws.

Another approach to puzzle through would be a lap joint. Rabbets in the leg and the rail could allow the rail to set flush with the outside surface of the leg. The rail could be screwed to the leg once the legs are installed. But then plenty of leg must surround the lag screw or threaded insert that attaches the leg to the sofa for strength. Therefore for this approach to work, the rabbet in the leg would need to shallow and perhaps the lag screw or threaded insert offset in the leg. The rabbet in the rail would have to be fairly deep to get the leg and rail flush. If there are rails on the sides as well as in the front and the rabbets in the legs is cut to the interior of the legs, the rails at the sides and the front would also need to be lapped; or the rabbet in the legs cut to the outside of the legs. Ideally the rabbets in the legs and rails would be fastened from the interior of the legs, but trim screws painted to match the finish on the legs and rails would make trim screws difficult to see especially in the limited light under the sofa if installed from outside toward the inside of the legs.

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

780 posts in 1963 days


#3 posted 07-22-2016 01:32 AM

I agree that it is a good application for pocket holes.

Otherwise make corner braces.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

780 posts in 1963 days


#4 posted 07-22-2016 01:37 AM

Or, as an alternative to the corner brace, you could use simple cleats

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View jbay's profile

jbay

812 posts in 360 days


#5 posted 07-22-2016 02:12 AM

They make all kinds of rafix/minifix connectors. basically a cam lock that a pin goes into.
Would work great for the application your asking about.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Cam%20Lock%20furniture%20Connectors&qs=n&form=QBIR&pq=cam%20lock%20furniture%20connectors&sc=2-29&sp=-1&sk=

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View pnewelljr's profile

pnewelljr

22 posts in 553 days


#6 posted 07-22-2016 02:26 PM

I think the cam lock was what I was looking for. The only reason I dont want to use a normal screw joint (pocket hole, corner, etc) is that I move quite often and am worried it wont be able to take being uninstalled and reinstalled enough.

They only thing I am nervous about is making the bigger hole for that joint? I am guessing that cant be done with a drill bit?

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

780 posts in 1963 days


#7 posted 07-22-2016 02:45 PM

Cam locks are a great solution, just take your time to get everything accurate.

From memory, the larger hole is about 3/4” diameter (it’s been a while since I have had anything to do with one, but I’m sure others will put me right). It is done with a forstner bit, which is often most easily used in a drill press, but can be used in a hand drill – you might want to practice with some scrap wood first.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

817 posts in 381 days


#8 posted 07-22-2016 03:10 PM

pnewelljr,

jbay’s suggestion will produce a joint strong enough for your application. But it brings bondogaposis’s post to mind. The cam lock system seems to me to offer a significant and difficult to overcome challenge, if my assumption is correct. I assume that legs are installed by screwing them to the sofa. Once the legs are secured in place, the legs must be spread apart in order for the rail to clear the post protruding from the legs of the cam lock system, which I doubt could be done. To overcome this problem, a dado could be routed into the rails to accept the post mounted to the leg. This would probably compromise the strength of the cam lock system.

I seems to me that for this system to work, the legs and rails would be fastened together to form a base assembly. The assembly would then have to be attached to the sofa using some other fastening method than spinning the legs onto a lag-connecting-stud.

View pnewelljr's profile

pnewelljr

22 posts in 553 days


#9 posted 07-22-2016 03:58 PM

I agree that putting the frame together first, and then attaching to the sofa would be optimal, but that would require quite a bit more planning and work. I am still considering it as an option. I do move fairly often (every 1 to 2 years), so being able to easily take it apart and put it together is part of my consideration.

View jbay's profile

jbay

812 posts in 360 days


#10 posted 07-22-2016 04:12 PM

Sorry, my drawing was misleading.
They make a rafix connectors that slides over the post.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1179 days


#11 posted 07-30-2016 03:07 AM

Maybe try a search for “bed bolt connector”

These are perhaps a step beyond the basic cam lock type solution. These things are made to hold beds together. (And think about what some beds must support; keep it clean now.)

As well, they can simply be unscrewed for moving.

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

39 posts in 303 days


#12 posted 07-30-2016 11:56 AM

For simple, fast, and easy a Z shaped angle bracket would work. The bracket would be screwed to the back of the cross piece. You could attach a hanger bolt to the backside of the legs and secure the angle bracket to it with a wing nut or hex nut. Same principle as Tootles’ cleats but a little faster and simpler….also easier to install and take apart. You could get fancy with a threaded insert into the leg and a bolt to hold the Z bracket.

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