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Forum topic by McFly posted 07-21-2016 11:00 AM 816 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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McFly

188 posts in 494 days


07-21-2016 11:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple walnut joining

Made a cuttingboard from some edge grain maple, added walnut stripes and glued up before realizing the table saw I was using trailed off at the end of each board, leaving some significant gaps in a few places as wide as 3/32”.

Any chance I could get away with using West Systems 205/207 epoxy to fill these bacteria grabbing eyesores?


17 replies so far

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2243 days


#1 posted 07-21-2016 12:17 PM

If already glued – don’t know how it will hold up. 3/32” is a pretty good gap.

I would make a new one and dry fit before assembly.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#2 posted 07-21-2016 12:20 PM

I would cut off the bad section and use the board for another purpose like a cheese board or serving tray.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1462 days


#3 posted 07-21-2016 12:55 PM

You could slot all the glue lines to 3/32 and insert some shims of a contrasting wood. Then it would look like you did it on purpose.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#4 posted 07-21-2016 12:57 PM

Cut the ends off and make a shorter board.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View JayT's profile

JayT

4786 posts in 1678 days


#5 posted 07-21-2016 12:59 PM

Another option would be to make breadboard ends to cover the gaps.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

907 posts in 1502 days


#6 posted 07-21-2016 01:46 PM

Were you using a glue line rip blade? If not, I’m wondering why didn’t you joint the edges?

-- "woodworker with an asterisk"

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#7 posted 07-21-2016 01:51 PM

Brian has my favorite idea, that’s a true wood worker, use youre screw ups to your advantage they will never know.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

819 posts in 387 days


#8 posted 07-21-2016 02:17 PM

McFly,

If a couple of ifs are true, then flipping the strips end for end should cancel out the 3/32”, assuming my geometry is correct. 1) If the trailed off by 3/32” means the strips are tapered from one end to the other. 2) If flipping the strips end for end does not spoil the look you are going for.

Flipping strips end for end would put a narrow end between two wider ends along one end of the cutting board and at the other end, the same strips would be a sandwich of a wide end between two narrow ends.

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 169 days


#9 posted 07-21-2016 02:35 PM

Next time I have a math question I’m asking Jbrow, That’s pretty slick thinking there

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1419 days


#10 posted 07-21-2016 06:39 PM



McFly,

If a couple of ifs are true, then flipping the strips end for end should cancel out the 3/32”, assuming my geometry is correct. 1) If the trailed off by 3/32” means the strips are tapered from one end to the other. 2) If flipping the strips end for end does not spoil the look you are going for.

Flipping strips end for end would put a narrow end between two wider ends along one end of the cutting board and at the other end, the same strips would be a sandwich of a wide end between two narrow ends.

- JBrow

That cannot be the case here. If the individual pieces were all tapered from end to end then gluing them side to side would not create any gaps, but would result in a piece that was not rectangular. The OP has to mean that the very end of some pieces have a taper to them. Hard to understand how it happened on the table saw unless he was doing something like using a push stick and failed to keep the work against the fence as it cleared the blade.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2534 days


#11 posted 07-21-2016 07:15 PM

you could rip a 1/4 groove and put some inlay in. I’ve found in the long run when I have an opps some times it’s best to just chuck it start over. Do you want to have that mistake with your name on it?

Experience is a great painful teacher. Do it over.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#12 posted 07-21-2016 09:56 PM

+1 to Bones, it’s fire pit time, charge it off to the cost of education and rest assured the next one is going to be nice! Think I might edit my sig line to “Know when to burn it” LOL

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 494 days


#13 posted 07-21-2016 11:02 PM

Oh, jeez. I fat-fingered my keypad this morning. It’s a 1/32” gap, but they’re EVERYWHERE!!

I’ll go snap a few pics of the atrocity.

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 494 days


#14 posted 07-21-2016 11:05 PM

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 494 days


#15 posted 07-21-2016 11:28 PM

Many thanks for the lively discussion. To address some of the high points;

Slotting to 3/32” and inlaying another species is genius. Well done!

The hasty decision that started all this was my not planing all components to the same dimensions after cutting them. Would have produced a perfect board!

Laying wide ends to skinny ends is more genius. However, in my application, it was ramdom end pieces cut from longer stock. It’s a known isssue with this particular belt-fed ripsaw. In any event,Well Done!

I decided to embrace my hasty glue up and went with the fix of pressing tbiii glue & walnut wood flour into the gaps and immediately sanding it off w/100g. Should dry up nice & dark.
I’ll wrap things up this weekend by sanding up to 220g, wetting it down and starting up again from 120-400g before I oil & wet sand to 1000.

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