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Sanding on the band saw?

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Forum topic by michaelinthebasement posted 07-20-2016 05:00 PM 739 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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michaelinthebasement

21 posts in 588 days


07-20-2016 05:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw sander sanding

The tool in my shop that I call “band saw” calls itself “band saw/belt sander.” Does anyone have any thoughts or feelings on sanding using a band saw? I have to lightly taper some small parts (1/4”x3/8”x6”) and a belt on the band saw sounds like it might be a safer option than any other that I have available. Opinions or other suggestions are appreciated.


19 replies so far

View jmos's profile

jmos

735 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 07-20-2016 05:07 PM

I’ve never seen a sanding belt made for a bandsaw (not that that means they don’t exist.) It also wouldn’t give you much sanding surface.

They do make disks that go on a table saw that would work.

If you have a belt sander you can use that too; I made a simple jig that holds my belt sander on its side and has a little table in front of the belt, so I can sand smaller parts.

A small block plane can be very useful for something like this too.

-- John

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 162 days


#2 posted 07-20-2016 05:14 PM

use a sanding block, requires some skill but sounds like a good time to learn, and I don’t mean to sound like a smartass. good luck, also the block plane as jmos mentioned but that requires even more practice

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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michaelinthebasement

21 posts in 588 days


#3 posted 07-20-2016 05:46 PM

Sanding belt are available at 2sand.com. Sounds like they make them individually for each order. I have the table saw disk but that scares me for such small parts.

I tried sanding blocks first but found it difficult to get the nice square corners that I need. But after some deep thought over my lunch break, I think I can clamp the part in a vice, held in by sacrificial wooden jaw pads, align everything with the pads flush and the part slightly proud, then sand down to the pads. I think I’ll leave the building of the belt sander jig to sometime when I’m not in the midst of a project that has taken way too long already.

I think I will get those sanding belts anyway. I like the thought of using them to sand free-form contours on things like spoon handles.

Thanks for weighing in.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#4 posted 07-20-2016 05:54 PM

A sanding belt of the right length could be used on a bandsaw, but it would be a hassle to set up. The guides would have to be removed and tracking altered. Not worth the trouble. A 1×30 belt/disc sander can be bought for less than $100 that would be a welcome addition in any shop.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2098 days


#5 posted 07-20-2016 09:01 PM

There was a thread about this some time in the past year. The sanding belts at that time were very reasonably priced. There were some folks here who have used them and can advise on the challenges involved. Search for it!

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2098 days


#6 posted 07-20-2016 09:04 PM

Here it is!

View MikeUT's profile

MikeUT

123 posts in 819 days


#7 posted 07-20-2016 11:14 PM



There was a thread about this some time in the past year. The sanding belts at that time were very reasonably priced. There were some folks here who have used them and can advise on the challenges involved. Search for it!

- Ocelot

Thanks for reminding me! I saw the other post when it was first posted. I was going to get some but got distracted and forgot about it. I went ahead and ordered a few from customsandingbelts.com for my Delta 14” bandsaw. The belts were only $4 each, not bad! I need to make some replacement handles for some planes and I’m hoping this will be a good way to do it. I hate sanding in small spaces. Worst case scenario it doesn’t work and I can’t take my wife to a McDonalds date…

View Rockytime's profile

Rockytime

16 posts in 141 days


#8 posted 07-21-2016 01:03 AM

I have an older Craftsman 12” band saw which is called band saw/sander. The motor at the bottom has an extended shaft on the armature which supposedly can be used with a sanding disc. That is not what you are talking about. Not very practical and kind of weird tho.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#9 posted 07-21-2016 03:03 AM

The 12” craftsman band saw /belt sander came with a 1/2” wide sanding belt that could be put on in place of the blade. You had to take the guides off and put on a backing plate. It works pretty well as a small belt sander. takes a few minutes to change back and forth.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Puzzleman's profile

Puzzleman

411 posts in 2404 days


#10 posted 07-21-2016 10:04 AM

I have been using an band saw as a 1” belt sander for years. The band saw is dedicated to sanding only. I have another band saw that I use for sawing.

I have my custom belts made at Klingspor.

Yes I took the guides off and made a support to go behind the belt where the sanding takes place. Then I changed the dust collection to having a gulper on the top as I found that the one underneath didn’t get the dust well.

If need more info let me know.

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1449 days


#11 posted 07-21-2016 12:00 PM

MikeUT, for plane totes, do you have a router table? A Template and a trimmer bit, then a roundover bit can get the shape quickly, with a little rasp and sanding work to finish.

View michaelinthebasement's profile

michaelinthebasement

21 posts in 588 days


#12 posted 07-21-2016 01:59 PM

Thanks, Ocelot.
Thanks, Johnstoneb.
Sounds like it is worth a few bucks to give it a try.

View MikeUT's profile

MikeUT

123 posts in 819 days


#13 posted 07-21-2016 03:13 PM



MikeUT, for plane totes, do you have a router table? A Template and a trimmer bit, then a roundover bit can get the shape quickly, with a little rasp and sanding work to finish.

- OSU55

Yes sir, I have a router. I make them now by cutting them out on a bandsaw, shaping with a roundover, and then sanding to finish like you said. I really dislike sanding by hand so I am hoping that a thin belt without a backer will help me get in to the nooks and crannies without having to finish by hand. Sanding by hand is probably the only thing I dislike doing in the shop besides cleaning up. If I can spare myself a few minutes of it I’ll give it a try.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3122 days


#14 posted 07-21-2016 03:50 PM

Sanding by hand is probably the only thing I dislike doing in the shop besides cleaning up.

I have yet to meet a woodworker that enjoys sanding! I’d even prefer cleaning the shop.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View michaelinthebasement's profile

michaelinthebasement

21 posts in 588 days


#15 posted 07-21-2016 06:22 PM

Even sanding can be fun. Smoothing a curve on the oscillating spindle sander or doing some fine shaping with a sanding drum chucked in a drill press can deliver some of the same satisfaction that turning at the lathe can. Unfortunately, the task at hand is tweaking a flat, straight edge. Not fun.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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