LumberJocks

Sanded some cherry color change

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by McFly posted 07-19-2016 12:27 AM 401 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 492 days


07-19-2016 12:27 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cherry

Had to down a cherry & maple panel a little further than I had intended and managed to scrub all the nice deep color right out of the cherry.

Short of staining it, what are my options to get that color back before I seal it with oil?
Do I just put it in the sun and hope for the best?


11 replies so far

View WDHLT15's profile (online now)

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#1 posted 07-19-2016 12:35 AM

If the cherry was natural, it will turn darker again when exposed to sunlight.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 492 days


#2 posted 07-19-2016 01:48 AM

How long should it take to darken? Don’t want to hit it with a UV protectant until it gets back to the right color.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1460 days


#3 posted 07-19-2016 02:51 AM

I made some cherry tables. They were white after milling and sanding. I put two coats of natural danish oil on them, then 3 coats of wipe on poly. You can see what they looked like after finishing in my projects. About a month later, they are 5 or 6 shades redder.

I believe it is oxygen that turns them red, not UV light. I only say that because I have piles of wood in my basement that get very little light and all are much darker than they were when I got them.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1460 days


#4 posted 07-19-2016 02:53 AM

In fact, if you look at the pictures of my end tables, they are now almost the same color as the TV stand. That TV stand is faux wood cherry. The tables are that dark, but more of a brown tint. Its been a year, but all the color change happened in the first few months, and under the finish.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 167 days


#5 posted 07-19-2016 03:20 AM

Yep that color will come back, matter of fact don’t know of a way to stop it.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 492 days


#6 posted 07-19-2016 10:42 AM

So it’s more oxidization than a UV light reaction? This will work for me, as the project is a bathroom pullout cabinet and won’t see much, if any sunlight at all.

Guess I’ll just plow forward and hope for the best!

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2282 days


#7 posted 07-19-2016 11:50 AM

According to this article (http://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/adding_age_to_cherry) in FWW, it’s primarily a reaction to light, but it needs oxygen to happen:

“Why? The color change that takes place in cherry exposed to the sun is a continuous thing that’s going on, explains USDA Forest Products Laboratory expert Mark Knaebe.

“It’s a logarithmic rate of change, kind of like a nuclear half-life. It starts out fast and then slows down,” which gives the “untanned” area time to catch up, he said.

While all wood is in some measure chromophoric (meaning it changes when exposed to light), cherry has a more immediate and noticeable reaction to ultraviolet (UV) light than do most other domestic hardwoods. But, says Knaebe, moisture and oxygen are also necessary for the reaction to occur. If you were to build in a vacuum, the color of your wood wouldn’t change.”

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1460 days


#8 posted 07-19-2016 12:29 PM

Interesting article. Thanks. I guess the UV glass in my windows doesnt work! The tables are in the living room, across from a big window. They turned in a few months. The stuff in the basement gets no direct sun, and turned as well. So I think your bathroom cabinet will turn dark again even if it doesn’t get much light. Perhaps my wood pile and tables would have turned that much faster out doors.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#9 posted 07-19-2016 02:36 PM

More light = faster reaction. But it all changes with time.
I bought 500 BF of green cherry about 3 years ago.
Some of it sat outside for 3 or 4 days before I got it all stickered and stacked.
That outdoor exposure for just a few days made a huge difference.
After a few months they all evened up.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 492 days


#10 posted 07-19-2016 04:30 PM

Think I’ll mill it to size and wing it. If the client gripes, I’ll just quote the article to her.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#11 posted 07-19-2016 05:00 PM

One of the many, many challenges working with cherry.

Ever try to dry a stack of it and keep it flat? Burns, warps, changes colors, and blotches.
Cripes, how did this ever become furniture wood.
It does look beautiful when finished.

I am too impatient to let cherry age naturally, so I use a pre-stain conditioner made from 3 parts denatured alcohol to 2 parts bullseye sealcoat. Then it can be stained with oil based stain without fear of blotching.

It continues to get darker with time. Each new clearcoated cherry project looks very different than the next one, so the stain really helps to even things out.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com