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anybody know this wood?

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Forum topic by banjobarry posted 07-18-2016 01:34 AM 721 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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banjobarry

7 posts in 2129 days


07-18-2016 01:34 AM

Hi all,

Can’t figure out what wood this is. I got the log in the spring before the leaves were out. I’m in Brooklyn, NY. The fresh-cut heartwood was pretty green.

Many thanks,
Barry


18 replies so far

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oldwood

56 posts in 706 days


#1 posted 07-18-2016 03:56 AM

If you were inthe South I would be pretty sure it was sweet gum but I don’t know if it grows in Brooklyn. Nice turning.

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Thuzmund

140 posts in 1091 days


#2 posted 07-18-2016 04:39 AM

The trouble (and fun) with city wood is that trees may have no logical relationship to the region itself. (Well, beyond the logical requirement of being able to survive a northeast winter, in this case.)

My guess is poplar, though I wouldn’t bet my life on that. But when creams and greens are involved in LOCAL species, it often will be poplar. I am suspicious though because poplar can have pretty thick growth rings (it grows fast) and yours seems pretty tight. Is the wood a bit light for its size? If so, that might also suggest poplar, which is lighter, and less hard than many other “hardwoods.”

-- Here to learn

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Thuzmund

140 posts in 1091 days


#3 posted 07-18-2016 04:41 AM

Oh and BTW: cool bowl! Looks great on its own, and I also love the stuff that comes out of logs people think are “trash.” If you are using city-felled lumber, all the better for your karma!

-- Here to learn

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#4 posted 07-18-2016 11:28 AM

It is a hickory.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#5 posted 07-18-2016 11:47 AM

+1 ^^

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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bosum3919

338 posts in 1081 days


#6 posted 07-18-2016 12:41 PM

Hickory

-- Bob

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bearkatwood

1198 posts in 474 days


#7 posted 07-18-2016 01:03 PM

Yup, hickory.

-- Brian Noel

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3204 days


#8 posted 07-18-2016 03:04 PM

I would say Poplar. (gum) – - – but I sure cant say hickory is incorrect.

It is the only domestic I have seen that gets that deep purple mineral streaks coloration in the heart of the OP’s picture.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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banjobarry

7 posts in 2129 days


#9 posted 07-18-2016 09:41 PM

Thanks everybody!

I’m going to say it’s poplar. I found youtube video that looks exactly like the log when I cut it up. The top picture is a little deceptive, since the green was a bit more vibrant three months ago.

And yeah, this came from a tree the city cut down. Always exciting to get lucky and find something that I can manage to lift.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#10 posted 07-19-2016 12:41 AM

Yellow poplar is diffuse porous. Your wood is ring porous, not diffuse porous from what I can see in the pic. A close up pic of the end grain will confirm this if you want to be sure what you have.

Bark color may be deceptive in the pic, but yellow poplar bark is silver grey in color. Hickory is a dark black gray, like what I see in the pic.

Yellow poplar wood is very light. Hickory is hard and dense. Was the wood hard and dense?

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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banjobarry

7 posts in 2129 days


#11 posted 07-19-2016 01:13 AM

I wouldn’t have thought poplar at first, just based on my experience with big-box store poplar. That has always seemed softer to me than this wood. I also wouldn’t call it light necessarily, but this is interesting: the walls are not too thin, maybe 1/4 of an inch, but light shines through it pretty easily, which makes me think it’s not so dense. Maybe that’s not correct?

I think the wood is diffuse porous. Am I right that woods like oak and ash are diffuse porous? This wood is different from that. Here’s a closer pic of the rings:

Here’s the bark in different light. It’s hard to an objective shot.

And one more of the wood, more freshly cut.

Also, online, I found a long list of trees in the park this tree was cut from. One of them is Tulip Tree, which this could be.

What do you think? Does this info change your mind? (And thanks again for your thoughts.)

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waho6o9

7172 posts in 2039 days


#12 posted 07-19-2016 01:21 AM

Sure would make a nice table top!

View Thuzmund's profile

Thuzmund

140 posts in 1091 days


#13 posted 07-19-2016 02:13 AM

That bark sure does look like pignut hickory though! :) Fresh Hickory kinda smells like a horse barn to me. Also it will be heavier, harder, and move more than poplar when it dries.

Hickory will show porous rings—little holes that run down the length like straws. Just like oak and ash. I can’t wait to hear the verdict!

-- Here to learn

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#14 posted 07-19-2016 11:34 AM

The extra pics really help. Oak and ash are ring porous not diffuse porous.

The bark does look more like yellow poplar in the second bark pic. Thanks for the extra info. I would go with yellow poplar now.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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banjobarry

7 posts in 2129 days


#15 posted 07-19-2016 12:50 PM

I think we’re at poplar! Not only did I figure out the wood, I learned a few other things too. Thanks again everyone!

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