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Sand down end grain without rolling over corner

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Forum topic by treesner posted 07-16-2016 09:29 PM 1034 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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treesner

167 posts in 428 days


07-16-2016 09:29 PM

How do you sand down end grain without rolling over the edge? I tried chiseling it down and block planing it on a few before sanding but the plywood end grain doesn’t plane that well


16 replies so far

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AandCstyle

2571 posts in 1721 days


#1 posted 07-16-2016 09:59 PM

Trees, clamp a piece of scrap to each side of the piece at the desired level. Make pencil lines on the scrap and stop sanding when you notice the pencil disappearing. This will be easier if you are able to remove the piece from your assembly. HTH

-- Art

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joey502

487 posts in 982 days


#2 posted 07-16-2016 10:27 PM

Stacking boards together and sanding as Art mentioned above works well if the parts are not assembled. You should be able to clamp more pieces to the part in your picture and get better results than your second pic.

Sanding the edges by hand works well too. I sometimes put the sand paper on my bench or table and run the board over it, work pretty well. Similar motion to edge jointing a board. Again this is before the parts are assembled.

I find my end result is much better when i sand and break the sharp corners before assembly.

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bbasiaga

757 posts in 1459 days


#3 posted 07-16-2016 10:36 PM

Card scraper?

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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jbay

814 posts in 363 days


#4 posted 07-16-2016 10:42 PM

Honestly, you should have noticed them being off before you built it.
Stack all your pcs next to each other and it would have shown, or dry fit them first and it would have shown.
Then you could have run them all back thru the saw taking off what ever was needed to make them all the same.
A good sanding block with 100 grit should knock it down. I use a 3/4” block with a 4×24 sanding belt wrapped around it tight.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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treesner

167 posts in 428 days


#5 posted 07-16-2016 10:45 PM



Honestly, you should have noticed them being off before you built it.
Stack all your pcs next to each other and it would have shown, or dry fit them first and it would have shown.
Then you could have run them all back thru the saw taking off what ever was needed to make them all the same.
A good sanding block with 100 grit should knock it down. I use a 3/4” block with a 4×24 sanding belt wrapped around it tight.

- jbay

It’s off because the glue up, shifted
I guess I could use even more clamps to pull that down?

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jbay

814 posts in 363 days


#6 posted 07-16-2016 10:54 PM

Well, It won’t take too many times to correct that.
Lesson learned,

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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bobasaurus

2670 posts in 2648 days


#7 posted 07-16-2016 11:25 PM

I would use a sharp low angle block plane held at a skew angle to level that off.

-- Allen, Colorado

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 945 days


#8 posted 07-16-2016 11:35 PM

^^^Yes!!!

You do it buy using the right tool!!

For something like what you’ve show, I would use a tablesaw to trim it down. Sneak up on it!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Tootles

780 posts in 1966 days


#9 posted 07-17-2016 03:46 AM

I’d use a block plane to remove most of what you need to take away and then I’d hand sand it at the end – using a simple sanding block and paper, not a sanding machine. You could probably use a cork block without problem, but if flatness / not rolling over is your main concern, just use a scrap of wood. Its flatness and hardness will help prevent rounding the corners, just as long as you keep it in even contact with the edge that you are sanding.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

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JBrow

818 posts in 384 days


#10 posted 07-19-2016 03:32 PM

treesner,

I hate the thought of sanding, planing, or scrapping. It is a slow go and joining a sanded or planed edge to a face frame could be difficult.

An alternative not yet unmentioned approach is to clamp a straight edge flush to the edges at each end and then use a router with a pattern bit to flush up the edges of the box. A wide straight edge would keep the clamps out of the way while holding the straight edge in place. The inexpensive pattern bits with cutting edges parallel to the shank of the bit would work but could produce some tear out. Much more expensive spiral compression pattern bits, according to manufacturers, greatly reduces tear out; however, since I have yet to add this bit to my collection I am unable to verify or refute manufacturers’ claims. A spiral up cut bit in the router outfitted with a guide bushing would also reduce tear out, but set up would be more difficult since the straight edge would have to be offset.

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bondogaposis

4030 posts in 1815 days


#11 posted 07-19-2016 03:44 PM

Don’t sand, use a block plane.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1758 posts in 602 days


#12 posted 07-19-2016 05:01 PM



I would use a sharp low angle block plane held at a skew angle to level that off.

- bobasaurus

Yep^. I’ve used it on plywood with no problems. Gotta be sharp though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#13 posted 07-19-2016 10:01 PM

That’s what router trim bits are for. If you want to sand end grain, use a stationary disc sander.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13732 posts in 2082 days


#14 posted 07-20-2016 01:37 AM

Answers ranging from router/jig/pattern bit, to dragging the cabinet across a table saw, to hand sanding, to block plane, to sanding with doubler blocks in place. Quite the range of answers.

I’d also vote sharp block plane. It’d make short work of the problem, and not prove difficult to joint face from to if done with any care at all.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Aidan1211

189 posts in 290 days


#15 posted 07-20-2016 11:26 AM

Planes when tuned and sharpened will slice that plywood no problem and a lot cleaner than sanding. another option if you want is to match a piece of ply level with where you want it to end up and run a up spiral flush trim bit. Gotta be razor sharp and i’d probably climb cut to prevent any little buggers chipping.

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

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