LumberJocks

Filling voids (knot, cracks) a different way.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by TinWhiskers posted 07-16-2016 04:10 PM 383 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


07-16-2016 04:10 PM

Put ample amount of epoxy in void. Smear a bit along the perimeter. Instead of tape, use a piece of paper, I used typing paper, and cover the void with the paper. It will stick to the epoxy. Now turn the piece over. The epoxy will flow to the surface. The paper is much better than any tape.

1. You won’t waste epoxy filling the whole void.

2. No epoxy flowing thru the piece of wood onto bench.

Been playing with that idea for a couple days. Working out great. Cracks on the edge? Epoxy paper to the edge to stop flow. Paper sands away easily with a good sander.


16 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

8255 posts in 2893 days


#1 posted 07-16-2016 04:16 PM

Great idea. Thanks.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 689 days


#2 posted 07-16-2016 05:03 PM

Out of curiosity, why is paper better than tape and how do you not waste epoxy filling the whole void?
You’re still filling the void aren’t you? Just blocking the epoxy from flowing out with paper instead of tape.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#3 posted 07-16-2016 05:26 PM

I don’t EVEN understand what you’re doing. Fill the hole, turn the paper over, hmmmmmm?
Show me via pics if you can ‘cause this is of interest to me.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#4 posted 07-16-2016 05:29 PM

I have trouble having tape stick to the wood. Especially in contact with epoxy.

Give the epoxy time for it to get the right stickiness and thickness. Put epoxy into the void. Slap on the paper. I have been getting good enough seals to be able to flip the wood over. The epoxy will flow down to the surface of the wood and not into the void. Some cracks will use a huge amt to fill if not flipped. Plus many are thru the wood and will drip out the other side. Flipping it will stop the seeping through. I would not depend on tape.

The normal way, you fill a crack. Bottom side is taped if needed. Epoxy soaks into crack. Next day add more. Next day add more…

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#5 posted 07-16-2016 05:39 PM

So what your saying is that there is still a void underneath your fill after it’s cured?

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1192 posts in 1359 days


#6 posted 07-16-2016 05:44 PM

OK, so you’re turning the wood upside down and instead of using gobs of epoxy filling from the bottom to the top, you’re using just enough to cover the crack at the top and below that the rest of the void?

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#7 posted 07-16-2016 05:46 PM

yes.

I would still use a good enough amt of epoxy to seal the crack or hold the knot in place.

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#8 posted 07-16-2016 05:49 PM



OK, so you re turning the wood upside down and instead of using gobs of epoxy filling from the bottom to the top, you re using just enough to cover the crack at the top and below that the rest of the void?

- ColonelTravis

Not just enough. I put in what is necessary.

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#9 posted 07-16-2016 05:55 PM



I don t EVEN understand what you re doing. Fill the hole, turn the paper over, hmmmmmm?
Show me via pics if you can cause this is of interest to me.
Bill

- Bill White

turn the piece of wood over. Pics coming.

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#10 posted 07-16-2016 06:02 PM

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#11 posted 07-16-2016 06:08 PM

Not the same piece of wood. But same results.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 689 days


#12 posted 07-16-2016 06:08 PM

If you’re not filling the crack and only the just the surface, is that enough to keep the crack from opening more?
A void filled with the epoxy is much stronger than the wood and will keep it from opening more.

How thick is the epoxy cap, the way you’re doing it?

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#13 posted 07-16-2016 06:25 PM

The pic is a 2.5’’ thick piece. A small crack like that I will put in as much epoxy as I can. Paper it and flip it.

With a large crack I will put sawdust into the crack. As much as I can without it being visible after setting. Fill with epoxy, paper it and flip. After more thought, I am probably saving more time than epoxy. Also enables me to work on the other side now.

View jbay's profile

jbay

816 posts in 364 days


#14 posted 07-16-2016 06:31 PM

Nice trick, but I don’t see it as an advantage for me. I would rather have the void completely full.
I build a small dam around the void with double stick tape (because it’s thick) then just overfill the hole.

It’s always nice to see what other people come up with,
Thanks for sharing!

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 417 days


#15 posted 07-16-2016 06:32 PM

Better example. I did fill this void with epoxy. In a short time it will need more epoxy as it seeps in. Then more epoxy. But, I covered in paper and flipped right after I filled. Still used plenty of epoxy to create a good fill.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com