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Forum topic by Warren posted 05-10-2010 12:18 PM 862 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Warren

57 posts in 2743 days


05-10-2010 12:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question ipe

Hi all,

I have been asked by a friend to make some exterior items, a table four chairs/stools and a couple of chests to be used for storage. He wants them in a Japanese theme so I’m really looking forward to the project.

I live in Spain where the heat can be brutal in the summer and the cold not to severe but definitely chilly in the winter and so I’m wondering about the design on the pieces. I intend to use Ipe for all of it to make sure it isn’t going to collapse after a couple of years but I’m wondering about wood movement.

Most other pieces Ive seen that are intended for outdoor use seem to be in the form of slats, attached to a substructure rather and panels glued up into one piece and I can see that this is to guard against wood movement.

Are there any circumstances when it is aceptable to glue up panel for exterior use?

Im thinking of things like this…....Exterior Table

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture


5 replies so far

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2537 days


#1 posted 05-20-2010 08:23 AM

Any panels wider than a few inches have to have room to move, especialy for outdoor furniture which is subject to much more temperature extremes. You can do large panels for outdoor funiture as long as the entire thing is allowed to float but slats are often used because it allows rain to go through rather than puddling up on the surface. I’d recommend sticking to slats for any table tops or surfaces like chair seats and backs where you don’t want puddles of water accumulating.

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

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CaptainSkully

1432 posts in 3022 days


#2 posted 05-21-2010 04:19 PM

Other than water pooling, there really should be no difference between building indoor vs. outdoor furniture. My indoor dining table moved 1/4” throughout the year, across the grain. Even if an outdoor piece moves more, you still have to allow room, it’s probably just a matter of degree. If it gets wet, it might swell even more. Ipe is an excellent choice BTW.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Warren 's profile

Warren

57 posts in 2743 days


#3 posted 05-21-2010 04:58 PM

I had an idea which was a little of the wal and that was to get the edges of the boards at 45 degrees and leave a small 6 millimetre space between them. Becaue of the angle, one board will pass behind the other making it appear that this is no obvious gap.

Its a little more interesting than tongue and groove but would it work…......l

-- Im more succesfull at making sawdust than I am at making furniture

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2537 days


#4 posted 05-21-2010 05:29 PM

No reason that shouldn’t work, you just need enough space to allow the boards to move. I wouldn’t do it myself though becuase of the extra work in cutting the angle on all the boards.

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3041 days


#5 posted 05-21-2010 05:36 PM

Don’t glue the center area just have it as you would a panel in a door and connect the bottom on battens the have longer than normal slotted holes for wood movement.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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